Stepping Towards a Digital Supply Chain

Technology is changing the way we look at logistics and, ultimately, the supply chain as a whole. With today’s global marketplace being what it is, companies need to be both agile and smart about the moves they make. “Making do” simply isn’t good enough. Supply chains, by necessity, need to be leaner, meaner, transparent, and most importantly, smarter.

The digital supply chain offers companies a degree of visibility and insight into their supply chain that was never before possible.

For that reason, many companies are beginning the process of digitizing their supply chain. Moving away from the analog game of tag that was the way of doing things in the past, the digital supply chain offers companies a degree of visibility and insight into their supply chain that was never before possible. In order to do it correctly, companies need to have a plan. “The impact of digital trends on the supply chain has caused plenty of excitement, but also confusion. In a 2017 Gartner survey of 318 supply chain organizations worldwide, 75% reported concerns about the governance of digital projects. Yet corporate digital business initiatives continue to evolve rapidly, and 36% of supply chain organizations say their own digital projects don’t align to them,” says Gartner contributor Rob van der Muelen.

Supply chain leaders should already have a plan for supply chain digital initiatives and how to align them to what’s going on in the wider organization and its ecosystem.

“Supply chain leaders should already have a plan for supply chain digital initiatives and how to align them to what’s going on in the wider organization and its ecosystem,” says Michael Burkett, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner. “Yet the reality is that organizations pursue digital projects in silos far too often.” Burkett encourages companies to be proactive and to “define the emerging technologies that will best optimize and transform your supply chain.” “Feed this expertise from the front line into the organization’s wider digital business strategy, and then do your part to make it a reality,” Burkett says.

Understanding the Digital Vision 

Wanting to digitize the supply chain is all well and good, but knowing what you want to accomplish with it is the important part.

Burkett says that the starting point for creating a solid plan for going digital begins with breaking out of the data silos and agreeing to a digital business vision across the entire organization. This agreement is what sets the gears in motion, where the needs of both the company and its customers are defined, and what changes will need to be made to the supply chain to make it happen. Wanting to digitize the supply chain is all well and good, but knowing what you want to accomplish with it is the important part. “Look for supply chain technologies that have the potential to open new revenue streams rather than simply efficiencies, and get buy-in and participation across the business,” says Burkett. 

Align the Supply Chain to Match the Vision 

According to Gartner, only 25 percent of supply chain organizations have their digital projects aligned under a single governance process. “A lack of alignment clearly makes it less likely a supply chain will successfully support key organizational priorities,” Burkett explains.This ultimately shapes what you can deliver to your customers and what changes will need to be made to the supply chain to make that happen. “For example, a product manufacturer’s business priority might be to ensure that a customer’s equipment never stops working. Digital advances now give it the ability to digitally monitor assets and offer solutions in near real time. This capability effectively creates or improves a service-based revenue stream for the manufacturer.” In order to make that a reality, the company must be able to predict a malfunction or failure and have a process in place to preemptive send both parts and a service technician to maintain the equipment to reduce downtime. In the past, this would have been all but impossible. However, digitization has created a useful toolkit that can make that a reality.

  • Internet of Things (IoT) to measure performance in real time 
  • Data Analytics to predict failure and automate delivery and service processes 
  • Mobile Data Access Capabilities 
  • Application program interfaces (APIs) to share data with the partner ecosystem 

Prioritizing Technology Investments  

Digital supply chains, when done correctly, do more than simply streamline operations, they become a differentiator from the competition, setting your company apart from all the others.

Investment in new technology can be hard to swallow, especially considering the uncertainty of the global market. As a result, many supply chain organizations tend to focus their investments on upkeep rather than upgrades. While that strategy might have a short-term effect of bolstering profits, it will ultimately prove to be short-sighted as customer’s expectations shift to a digitally based supply chain. Digital supply chains, when done correctly, do more than simply streamline operations, they become a differentiator from the competition, setting your company apart from all the others.“This is a supply chain that delivers a customer experience and not just a product,” says Burkett. “It’s an intelligent supply chain that makes decisions as it interacts across an ecosystem of digitally connected partners.” 

Simplify Your Supply Chain

BlueGrace Logistics offers complete, customized transportation management solutions that provide clients with the bandwidth to create transparency, operate efficiently, and drive direct cost reductions. For more information on how we can help simplify your supply chain, contact us at 800.MYSHIPPING or fill out the form below to speak to one of our freight experts today!  

Print Friendly, PDF & Email