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warehousing

Making your Warehouse, Worthy

For a logistics player to be successful, it is imperative to regularly check if every aspect of the supply chain process is working at optimum capability. The surest way to ensure this is to keep a checklist. Tom Peters, the author of In Search of Excellence, says, “Almost all quality improvement comes via simplification of design, manufacturing, layout, processes, and procedures.”

In this article, we delve into the details of making a warehouse future-ready and examine the steps required to achieve warehouse excellence.

The Bigger Picture – Before getting into the nitty-gritty and finer details, it is first important to have a macroscopic view and understanding of the warehouse as a whole. This entails mapping the warehouse, studying the building & area and checking the surfaces for damages and weak areas. All these actions ensure that before the warehouse is stocked, and equipment such as forklifts are brought in, it is capable of handling the capacity and regular operations.

Goods that are easily visible, make them easy to locate when timelines are short and add to the smooth functioning of the supply chain process.

Light, Ventilation & Drainage — A well-lit warehouse makes it easier to navigate and work in. Goods that are easily visible, make them easy to locate when timelines are short and add to the smooth functioning of the supply chain process.

Ventilation goes a long way in combating dust and fumes that may arise when moving equipment within the warehouse. A well-designed ventilation system will make a huge difference in maintaining the longevity of the warehouse. 

In a similar way, a disaster-proof drainage system can make all the difference in the preservation of products during a natural disaster such as a storm or a fire or even areas that are exposed to the elements. Paying due attention to designing these crucial details improves efficiency and adds immensely to not just improving daily operations, but also, preserving the warehouse in the long term.

Cleanliness is the Key — Keeping the warehouse clean entails a number of practices that contribute to the overall hygiene of the warehouse while making it easy to maneuver on a daily basis. Ensuring that trash cans are placed at convenient locations, emptying trash cans periodically, keeping the area clean, all play a part in the overall maintenance and upkeep of the warehouse. Additionally, keeping the floors clean afford clear visibility of the exit signs and protect against accidents that could occur due to spillage and obstructions that may happen during daily operations.

Safety is the most important factor in any industry and must be prioritized above all else.

Safety is Paramount — Safety is the most important factor in any industry and must be prioritized above all else. This includes various aspects from regular fire drills and ensuring the equipment is serviced and up-to-date for any contingency to giving employees access to adequate training and gear for safe operations. Staff handling forklifts and heavy machinery must be provided with certified hard hats, gloves, and other protective gear to protect against any mishap that might happen. Labels and handling instructions on products must be visible all the time. Continuous training of staff about the correct and expected ways of protecting themselves, others, and assets is essential. In the event of an emergency, staff must have easy access to all the tools necessary to not just protect themselves but any other persons that may be in the warehouse. These competencies can be the difference between life and death in times of crisis.

Regular checks and inspections are essential for maintaining the standard of a warehouse.

Miscellaneous — Apart from taking care to examine that the above aspects are in order, regular checks and inspections are essential for maintaining the standard of a warehouse. From checking the storage racks and vehicle inspection processes at the loading dock, to inspecting elements such as the quality of the railings, uniformity of the stairs, access areas, aisles etc. on a regular basis must be taken into due consideration and set within processes that should be part of a cycle within organizations.

Apart from the above, Everything Warehouse lists a warehouse audit checklist that demonstrates what an audit should include:

  • Facility current and optimum capacity and throughput
  • Logistical layout and material flow
  • Safety, security, and housekeeping
  • Systems functional capabilities and performance
  • Customer service performance metrics
  • Productivity analyses
  • Storage and handling equipment
  • Inventory accuracy
  • Identification of opportunities for improvement
  • Comprehensive warehouse audit report with recommendations

In conclusion, there are many aspects that go into making a warehouse and in turn, the whole supply chain process efficient and future-ready. If done periodically, this ensures smooth operations, regular maintenance & review and better planning.

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Connected Logistics is the Future of Global Trade

According to reports, the connected logistics market is set to grow at a CAGR of 30-35 percent by the year 2021. In the next 2 to 3 years, analysts predict the connected logistics industry to be worth USD 40 – 50 Billion. It is expected to change the entire landscape of the global supply chain.

Integrated, Digital, IoT, Smart Logistics, Automation, and Big Data are some of the words and phrases that we’ve come to associate with logistics. All these together give us what we call connected logistics. With even one of these aspects missing from the mix, it would be highly difficult to build a logistics network that links all the players in international trade.

Who Are Parts of The Connected Logistics Network?

But today, logistics has ceased to be just a process of storing and transporting goods.

More often than not, when we speak of logistics we tend to associate the word with storage of goods and their movement from location A to location B. But today, logistics has ceased to be just a process of storing and transporting goods. It’s no longer limited to transport and storage facilities.  Apart from the road, rail, air, and sea transport and warehouse operators, the term connected logistics also includes customer service teams, manufacturing, production planners, inventory planners, and the sales team. All these teams have responsibility for processes that are necessary to deliver the final product to the end consumer. IT companies, software and hardware providers enable these teams to stay connected and support them to deliver a superior customer experience through cutting edge technology. This is how evolved logistics has become.

It is now not only a crucial part of the supply chain, but also an essential element of an organization’s product and customer service strategy.

In fact, it will not be remiss to say that logistics is often a key differentiator – a USP for certain consumer products. In addition to the businesses and technology providers, connected logistics also includes lawmakers, cybersecurity monitoring agencies, and government authorities – especially transport, IT, and infrastructure departments across the globe. This group is responsible for creating a framework that can take into account the variations in rules and regulations across the globe and ensure that trade across borders is carried out efficiently.

What are the features of a Connected Logistics Network?

Real-time data: With the use of new and advanced technology and advanced analytics, the connected logistics network provides its users real-time data and market insights. This is making it simpler for organizations to make informed business decisions.

Now shippers can track their shipments from the time it leaves their warehouse or factory till the time it reaches the final place of delivery right on the platform where they booked the transport. 

Increased shipment visibility: Gone are the days when one had to follow up with customer service executives at transport companies to know the location of their shipments. Digitalization, RFID tags, and GPS trackers have immensely improved shipment visibility. Now shippers can track their shipments from the time it leaves their warehouse or factory till the time it reaches the final place of delivery right on the platform where they booked the transport. This is also facilitating better transport planning especially in the case of intermodal transportation.

Inventory management: Imagine a large warehouse with stacks of boxes of different SKUs. Earlier, warehouses would have to maintain physical records of the goods and manually manage FIFO and order picking. Even after the initial ERP systems were introduced, there were still some challenges in the order picking process. Now, with the new technology like the RFID tags and ERP systems warehousing operations have become much easier, less time consuming and more efficient.

JIT inventory: Both manufacturing and retail organizations are working on leveraging the Just in time inventory management concept to help reduce inventory holding and storing cost. This process can be better managed with the connected logistics network as an advanced system can be equipped to provide triggers for when is the optimum time to place an order for inventory – FG or raw material – so that it reaches the factory or store at just the right time.

Global compliance management: Global trade comes with different rules, regulations, and legal requirements. It is difficult to keep track of changes in the rules and adhere to all the requirements of each country one does business with. New systems that are equipped to store legal checkpoints and raise a red flag when these requirements are not being met are making it comparatively painless for companies to meet country-wise compliance requirements.

This not only reduces the organizations’ cost on systems and software, but it also ensures seamless flow of information from one process to another in a standard format which will, in turn, limit the loss of data.

Integrated systems: System integration is one of the major facets of connected logistics. Now, organizations do not need to maintain separate systems for their different departments. Transport management system, warehouse management system, sales and billing, production planning, and finance-management can all be integrated into one platform with different modules and controlled access. This not only reduces the organizations’ cost on systems and software, but it also ensures seamless flow of information from one process to another in a standard format which will, in turn, limit the loss of data.

Document management: System integration has also helped improve documentation management and storage. Now, documents pertaining to a shipment or sale can be stored in digital format on the system. There is limited need to store and maintain physical copies. Authorized personnel can easily access these documents whenever they need to. Potential benefits are:
● Easy access to delivery signatures, original BOLs, and W&I docs
● Fast PODs to verify deliveries and invoices
● Clear view of delivery receipts and customer notes
● Clean/organized shipping documentation

While the initial investment in such technology and equipment might seem huge, the returns are equally attractive.

While the initial investment in such technology and equipment might seem huge, the returns are equally attractive. Since these systems and technology have become the demand of the day, it has become imperative for organizations willing to get a share in global trade to upgrade their systems and stay connected to the global business via their logistics network. This is especially critical for 3PL and 4PL logistics service providers.

Get Connected

At BlueGrace, we offer a proprietary TMS that is designed to put the power of easy supply chain management and optimization back in your hands. BlueShip® 4.0 offers cutting-edge tools for strong reliability and quick performance. Many of our customers prefer to integrate their systems or ERPs such as SAP or NetSuite directly with our BlueShip platform. Our IT integrations team will work closely with your staff to complete the connection between systems, keeping you connected every step of the way. To request a BlueShip demo, call us at 800.MYSHIPPING or fill out the form below to speak to one of our experts.