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It’s Cold Outside. What Are My Options to Keep My Freight From Freezing?

Winter is rough on freight for many reasons. Snowstorms and ice can create dangerous travel conditions that delay trucks in the best case scenarios and can bring the supply chain to a screeching halt in the worst.

However, while most people are worried about the tractor-trailer jackknifing in the middle of the highway, most people aren’t considering the condition of the freight itself. Winter weather conditions can damage even the hardiest of freight. However, as most shippers are moving raw materials around, it raises the question: What are my options to keep my freight from freezing? 

Know Your Product

Did you know that freeze-dried goods like coffee and flour are vulnerable to spoilage due to low temperatures? Before you do anything else, it is vitally important to understand what temperature ranges are okay for your freight. Different goods require different temperatures, so what is perfect for one item might be too cold for another.

After all, it doesn’t make sense to spend the extra on specialized equipment for your freight if only certain items will survive the trip.

If you haven’t done so before, now is the time to take stock of your products and get a better understanding of what temperature is safe for your items to travel at. Not every product is rated for the same temperature, and some goods might need to be kept warmer than others. It’s important to make sure that you’re not mixing these types of items on your pallets. After all, it doesn’t make sense to spend the extra on specialized equipment for your freight if only certain items will survive the trip.

Plan Your Route And Keep An Eye On The Weather 

As the cold season runs from December to March, it’s important to plan accordingly. Understanding where your freight is going and what route it will take to get there is important. While California might be fairly warm when the rest of the country is freezing, the Midwest and Upper Northwest states can see temperatures fall to double digits, below zero.

Keep an eye out for any impending weather events that not only can that affect the temperature, but it can also delay your shipment.

Keep an eye out for any impending weather events that not only can that affect the temperature, but it can also delay your shipment. Both of which we are looking to avoid. 

Finding the Right Equipment

The best method to protect your freight from freezing is to utilize the right equipment for the job. Load it onto a temperature-controlled unit, such as a reefer truck or in a heated dry van trailer. A reefer unit is a trailer equipped with a refrigeration unit that controls the trailers’ internal temperature. While these units are typically used to keep goods cold during the summer months, they can also work in reverse, keeping freight at the right temperature even when it’s freezing outside.

Some drivers have the option of parking their trailers in a heated warehouse. This is a great option to take advantage of, especially if the shipment will arrive over the weekend when the loading dock might not be manned until the following business day.

Another option is for the driver to idle their truck. The engine’s small vibrations can actually prevent freight from freezing and can be useful in shorter hauls. This option can also be augmented by using thermal blankets and pallet covers, which can help keep most of the chill off freight during transit. The level of protection necessary will depend on what type of freight is being transported.  

Detail the Bill of Lading 

If you’re shipping temperature-sensitive goods, it’s important to document that on your bill of lading. Many carriers offer a protect from freeze (PFF) option, which can be agreed upon once a carrier accepts a load. If the shipper decides how they want their goods to be protected from the cold, this should be detailed in the BOL. A good rule to follow is the more detail provided, the fewer chances there are of damage to the product.

Additionally, issuing a PFF means that a claim can be filed when the freight arrives at its destination frozen. Otherwise, the shipper is liable to pay the damages to the freight.

Don’t let your freight give you the cold shoulder this winter. Take time to consider how you’re shipping it, where it’s going, and what kind of protection you’ll need to keep it in proper condition.

Festive Cheer and Cargo Theft Go Hand in Hand During the Holidays

The holidays bring three main things for the shippers – festive cheer, increased business, and high risk of cargo theft. While increased business orders and sales are the reason to rejoice for shippers, the equally high probability of having their cargo stolen during transit tends to dampen the festive spirit. But given the season and business needs, cargo theft during the holidays is unavoidable.

Tis the Season

According to LPM Insider, businesses in the U.S. lose around $15 to $30 billion dollars each year. This figure too is on the conservative side as quite a few incidents of cargo theft go unreported, it further reports.

Do we just let the robbers rob us of all the hard work that we and our teams put in to getting holiday shipments out, or is there something we can do to safeguard our business interest and our shipments?

Among the various commodities being shipped during the holiday season, products that cannot be tracked and food and beverages shipments tend to be targeted most by cargo thieves. This doesn’t mean that shippers of other commodities or bulky products can rest easy. Cargo theft is a reality for most during the holiday seasons, so much so that there are reports of gift packages being stolen from front porches. Do we just let the robbers rob us of all the hard work that we and our teams put in to getting holiday shipments out, or is there something we can do to safeguard our business interest and our shipments?

Preventive Measures

If we treat cargo theft like any other business or operational risks, we might be in a better position to deal with such incidents and mitigate their impact on our business during the holidays.

Here are some measures that the shippers, truckers, and warehouse operators can take to minimize theft during the festive season.

  1. Pre-plan shipment deliveries: While it might not be possible to completely avoid making a shipment delivery during the holiday season, it would be helpful if shippers and their transportation providers could work out a plan to deliver high-value shipments before the festive mood kicks in. This can, to an extent, minimize the risks of cargo theft.
  2. GPS enabled vehicles: Transportation providers should install GPS trackers in their vehicles to be able to effectively track the shipments until it reaches the final place of delivery. If the vehicle is tracked, any irregular stoppages or route that has been taken can be noted and inquiries can be made with the driver as soon as there is any deviation. Knowing that the vehicle is being tracked and that they can be held responsible, the drivers will also be more cautious while making unscheduled stoppages or leaving the vehicle unguarded for a long time.

    Third-party service providers, such as BlueGrace, are professional and value their market reputation. They have checks and balances in place to avoid cargo theft or any other risk to the shipments while it’s in their custody.

  3. Vetted service providers: When appointing services providers, shippers should properly vet them and do a thorough reference check. Third-party service providers, such as BlueGrace, are professional and value their market reputation. They have checks and balances in place to avoid cargo theft or any other risk to the shipments while it’s in their custody.
  4. Hire additional manpower: This point is especially for warehouse operators. During the holiday season, staff strength tends to be low. Try to get additional workers and guards for the warehouses to cover the operations and security posts during the holidays before the season sets in.
  5. CCTV cameras: Equip your warehouses with CCTV cameras to monitor the warehouse at all times. Be sure to place cameras in a position that all the entry and exit points are covered.
  6. Alarms: Installing burglar alarms in vehicles and warehouses, will work as an additional security measure and assist in warding off thieves.
  7. Locks: Even though this is one of the most basic security measures, it is necessary to reiterate it here. Check to be sure all locks on truck shutters and warehouse entry and exit points are sturdy and in working condition. Train your staff to double check the locks after the truck or the warehouse has been locked.
  8. Train your staff: Train your truck drivers and warehouse staff to be able to detect suspicious activity and people lurking around the shipment. If the staff is trained to notice any such activity around the shipment, they can be on their guard or take measures to protect the shipment. Drivers should also be trained to avoid parking the trucks in unsupervised areas or in places where the risk of theft is high. If there’s a helper traveling with the driver, both of them can take turns to watch over the vehicle when making a stop for refreshments or rest.

Year-round Security

While incidents of cargo theft increase during the holidays, making the safety of employees, customers, business partners and security of the shipments in your custody a company culture and a year-round process is crucial. When this becomes a business practice, preparing for the holiday shipment delivery won’t seem like such a huge task and will also ensure that your employees are well prepared to deal with any such situation.