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The Impact Of The Coronavirus On Surface Freight

Recall that at the beginning of the year, industry experts expected the surface freight spot market would gradually increase to make up for its decline over the past year. Every publication on the planet was encouraging shippers and logistics service professionals to start thinking about renewing their interest in contracted freight rates that would help keep freight spend under control. In addition, the uncertainty over a global trade war between the US and China was on the brink of collapse, and all signs indicated growth in the market. Then, the coronavirus became the latest hot topic in supply chain management. Shippers that wish to stay competitive need to understand a few things about the true impact of the coronavirus on surface freight and what they need to do to prepare for it now. 

What’s Happening With The Coronavirus? 

The coronavirus is a major threat to the global supply chain. While its spread has been largely limited to areas of the AIPAC region and a few thousand cases outside of that region, it appears to be catching fire more quickly. The mass quarantines in Wuhan applied the metaphorical breaks to production and left the Shanghai Containerized Freight Index closed for more than three weeks. Substantial drops in ocean container rate indices occurred, losing up to $100 per $800 in the time frame. While this might not seem like an issue for surface freight, it alludes to a lowering of spot rate volatility. Meanwhile, Greg Knowler of JOC.com notes that the coronavirus has not yet led to a “rapid resumption of manufacturing almost 4 weeks after the Chinese new year, factories are struggling to restart production. An advisory from UK foreign affairs stated February 17 words that China continues to restrict the movement of people in response to the coronavirus outbreak.” As the restrictions continue and grow more common, especially in areas like the US that are trying to keep the virus from spreading at all costs, the risk to spot rate markets will increase. Restricted movements effectively open more capacity and lead to the bottom falling out from the spot rate market.  

Potential Ways Coronavirus May Disrupt The Surface Freight Supply Chain 

The impact of the coronavirus on surface freight in the US is not yet a primary concern, reports DAT. It’s relative containment overseas and strict containment in the US means that its disruption will be menial for the upcoming weeks. However, even that is a relative example. US supply chains depend on Chinese imports, and as the factories shudder in empty silence, technology products, auto parts, and medicines and medical equipment import levels will decline. Thus, volume in the US will drop. As the drops occur, more carriers will face the problems of too much available capacity. It’s the grand irony of 2020. There were years upon years of discussions of preventing the capacity crunch, and now, there is just too much capacity to make a difference. 

The potential for disruption is severe, and companies need an alternate way to ensure a disruption-free supply chain.  

Of course, additional disruption risks remain. Widespread contamination of freight or spread of the virus in people could lead to mass callouts among drivers, a flat-out refusal to accept mildly ill truckers at warehouse gates, and more. The potential for disruption is severe, and companies need an alternate way to ensure a disruption-free supply chain.  

How to Lessen the Impact of the Coronavirus 

Let’s be clear on one area of concern. There is not a way or step that individual shippers can take to 100% stop the coronavirus from spreading around the globe. It is a virus, and it’s up to health professionals and experts to stop it. Now, that does not mean shippers are left with empty shelves and angry customers. Instead, it just implies a need for more diversity in the supply chain. Shippers need to increase the number of working carrier relationships.

Shippers should take added steps to ensure carriers comply with all applicable health and government regulations.

Shippers should take added steps to ensure carriers comply with all applicable health and government regulations. More visibility into truck location and ETA can also provide peace of mind to ensure shippers are not on the verge of interacting with truckers or others that were recently exposed to locations with a high volume of viral activity and potential effects of coronavirus on surface freight movements.  

Ensure you can always find available capacity and routes by leveraging an advanced transportation management system (TMS).  

Compared to the flu, the coronavirus is more life-threatening when people fail to take basic precautions, such as hand-washing, not touching the face, and staying home when ill. With that in mind, shippers should take those basic steps and radically evolve their logistics management operations to secure more drivers, more carriers, more trade lanes, more stops (or vice versa), and more suppliers. In other words, it is time to scale the supply chain network upward to find more suppliers and available business-to-business service partners to avoid disruptions. Also, do not cut your shipping volume due to the coronavirus. Instead, ensure you can always find available capacity and routes by leveraging an advanced transportation management system (TMS).  

Vaccinate Your Organization Against The Coronavirus With A BlueGrace Partnership 

Using a TMS is one critical way to vaccinate your organization against the coronavirus. If it is going to spread, you cannot necessarily stop it. However, taking the step of investing in a quality relationship with a TMS vendor and third-party logistics servicer, such as BlueGrace, will have a protective effect and help keep your business in business even as the virus spreads. Find out more about how to get started by completing the form below or call us at 800.MY.SHIPPING today. 

Understanding the Capacity Effects of the ELD Mandate

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Carriers in the trucking industry are still adjusting to the growing pains of the federally mandated electronic logging devices (ELDs) following implementation deadlines earlier this year. For many carriers, even with deadlines in the rearview mirror, there is still confusion around the details of the mandate. Even those who are fully intent on cooperating may not be confident that they are in full compliance, or which specific aspects of their operations even need to be in compliance. 

The fines, which went into effect in April, state that under Title 49, section 521, any driver or carrier who does not keep a Record of Duty Status (RODS) is subject to being pulled off the road and face a civil penalty of $1,000 to $10,000 for each offense. Even still, one-third of U.S. truck drivers still use paper logs to track hours of service, despite the federal mandate, says a new survey with 2,400 respondents from software-as-a-service (SaaS) company Teletrac Navman that provides GPS fleet tracking. 

But contrary to popular belief, fines are regularly being issued to carriers.

While there has been an industry narrative developing since news of the mandate emerged that the potential to face fines is more of a “boogeyman” scare-tactic than a real concern, the evidence tells a different story. But contrary to popular belief, fines are regularly being issued to carriers. Almost $32 million worth of fines had been racked up as of Feb. 28 and another $142 million as of Aug. 22, totaling at $174 million. 

Source: https://www.supplychaindive.com/news/fleets-not-using-ELD-data-survey/531410/

BlueGrace’s Brian Blalock, Senior Manager of Sourcing Strategy, and Raddy Velkov, Director of Trucking Operations, explain these fines’ effect on the nation’s trucking capacity, the lanes that are the most affected, and how to use mode optimization to respond to the situation in their webinar,“Response to the ELD Mandate”.

Blalock says that with trucks being taken off the road, shippers are experiencing a constriction of capacity, “which means things are becoming more and more difficult for us as shippers to be able to create good business plans, make good decisions and make sure our freight arrives on time and in full.” 

First, Blalock lays down how the ELD mandate affects different routes, i.e. local, short haul, tweener, and long haul.  

What Does the ELD Mandate Mean: Transit times, Capacity, and Rates 

Local (less than 100 miles): Runs that are under 100 air miles are considered not subject to the ELD mandate, so the segment of small carriers that operate entirely on a regional basis have been unaffected.  

Short Haul (100-450 miles) “As the mileage grows… there is more of an adjustment period due to the longer length of haul.” But if you drive beyond the 100-mile radius or take more than 12 hours to return to your home base, you are required to maintain a RODS.  

Tweener (450 – 800 miles) This category is the most affected by the ELD mandate, Blalock and Velkov explain. Smaller carriers that were running one- and two-day points illegally were able to charge shippers less because they were recording use of the equipment for one day, whereas the larger size carriers who were in compliance had to pay the true, higher amount. 

Once you’re inspected and ticketed by the DOT you are more likely to get ticketed or inspected again.

“Larger carriers… were compliant to run these two-day points,” Velkov explained. “Some of these larger carriers were already compliant for a lot of years, just due to the sheer size of their fleet.” Velkov added, “Once you’re inspected and ticketed by the DOT you are more likely to get ticketed or inspected again, so the carriers with larger fleets were getting inspected more than the owner-ops. with one or two trucks, so they wanted to adjust the playing field in this market space and be price competitive.”  

Long Haul (over 800 miles) The long haul runs are also affected by the ELD mandate, of course, but many carriers operating these runs were already in compliance. 

With the ELD-mandate changing business dynamics many carriers have made it their goal to minimize cost in order to reduce rates to stay competitive, but that’s only one piece of the puzzle.  

Analysis with BlueGrace 

If all of the conversations you’re having internally are about rates, you’re having the wrong conversation.

“If all of the conversations you’re having internally are about rates, you’re having the wrong conversation,” Blalock said, “because more of the cost can be driven out by better decisions than by any decisions that can be made to rates.”  Velkov and Blalock explain how businesses can use data to optimize their business models, using the metrics and analysis available with Bluegrace’s services. The process starts by looking at a full picture of the supply chain to understand the network and cost distribution. 

Shippers should internally ask questions like, which vendors are costing more money than they’re worth? Can I negotiate better dollar per pound rate with them? Are we losing money with this a specific vendor? Once you have a strong understanding of your current network and the costs associated with your vendors, you can begin to dig deeper by looking at various analysis offered by BlueGrace, such as the ship weight analysis, explained below.  

Ship Weight Analysis Report: This measure allows shippers to look at month-to-month based on average weights cost per pound per month to determine if there are any outliers. For instance, were there any particular times your company did better than others? 

There is a tendency to steer away from FTL because of cost, to shift to multiple LTLs, but this may not always be the best option.

“You’re not always looking for mistakes, but instances in which things were done considerably better,” Blalock commented. You want to understand the exact cost per unit, or as Blalock says, the cost to put each widget on the shelf. This will help you make smarter business decisions, for instance, whether or not to book full truckload (FTL) or less than truckload (LTL.) “There is a tendency to steer away from FTL because of cost, to shift to multiple LTLs, but this may not always be the best option,” Blalock said. You may be making the mistake of booking LTL thinking it is saving you excess cost, but if sixteen LTL booking costs you $200 each, versus paying for one $1000 FTL, you’ve just paid in excess of $2,200. 

How BlueGrace Can Help

With the ELD-mandate in effect and a capacity crunch in full swing, there is an industry-wide pressure to curb costs, but there is no reason to fold under the pressure. There are plenty of opportunities to save on costs waiting to be revealed. All it takes is a hard look at your business model.  To speak to one of our freight experts, call us at 800.MYSHIPPING or fill out the form below.