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managed transportation

Diversification Is The Lifeblood Of Your Supply Chain

In the current economic scenario where businesses are shutting shops with alarming regularity, it has become necessary for organizations to diversify their supply chain. Given the importance of the subject, we hosted a webinar on the topic – From Chips to Dips in Service? Supply Chain Impact of Diversifying Chris Kupillas, VP Sales, at BlueGrace Logistics discussed the topic. They talked about why it was crucial for businesses to bring in variety in their supply chain, what factors were needed to be considered and the challenges that businesses might face in the process. 

Below, taking reference from the article, we discuss why this is good for the business and how it can benefit them and other stakeholders in the ecosystem. 

How does a diversified supply chain help the business? 


Source: BlueGrace Logistics Webinar: From Chips to Dips in Service? Supply Chain Impact of Diversifying.

As the quote from Greg Foran suggests, diversifying the supply chain helps businesses stay relevant. There are multiple ways in which businesses can do this. They can offer variants in their current product offering, introduce new products, introduce the business to different regions within their country or go global.    

Variants and new products will allow businesses to retain customers by enabling them to cater to their ever-changing needs and demands. And entering new regions or countries will widen their customer base. A business with more products and/or serving multiple regions or countries tends to have a better chance at survival in times of economic recessions or downturns or political strife. 

Is diversification only for the demand side of the supply chain? 

No. For a business to be prepared for different cycles of the market, it is also important to introduce options on the supply side of the business. This means identifying new sources for raw materials, spare parts, and alternative manufacturers where they can outsource the manufacturing of their products if required. They also need to identify service providers like transporters, warehouse operators and 3PL service providers who can work with them when needed. Having these alternatives on standby or in a working relationship will ensure that in the event the regular service provider cannot fulfill the business requirement, the business will not suffer. 

Diversification is great for other stakeholders in the ecosystem 

A manufacturer is just one of the beneficiaries of a diversified supply chain. Other stakeholders in the business ecosystem also benefit from it. For example wholesalers, retailers, e-commerce websites, also benefit in the form of more saleable goods to offer their customers. For them, the wider the range of products, the higher the probability of making a sale. This means more business for them which ultimately generates more business for the manufacturer. 

Similarly, it provides transporters and other logistical service providers with more business and regular work opportunities. Take, for example, a small transporter who is working with a company that produces only seasonal goods – let’s say woolen garments. The transporter will only get work from this organization until the woolen garments season lasts. After that, it may have to search for another client until the season rolls back again. Now, if the same company started to also produce summer wear, the transporter will not have to engage another client if it doesn’t need to. It will have year-round work from one source. 

That’s not all. Diversification also empowers customers. It gives them multiple options to choose from. Since diversification also creates competition, it provides customers not only with quality options but also competitively priced products, making sure businesses work on creating better products within a set budget. 

What are the benefits of diversification for the supply chain? 

Now that we know why diversification is crucial for businesses, let’s look at why it is the lifeblood of it benefits the supply chain of your business. 

  1. Risk mitigation: As mentioned earlier, a diverse supply chain helps businesses sustain in less-than-ideal circumstances. It provides alternatives to continue the business even if the demand for a product goes down, or a supplier discontinues service or there is a disruption – political, nature-based, social, economic or cultural. For example, take the case of the coronavirus outbreak in China. If companies selling their products in China do not have a presence in other markets, it will adversely impact their business. Or if a company is only sourcing from China then it’s supply of material or products will be affected which would again create an untenable situation for their business. 
  2. More flexibility: A diverse supply chain provides opportunities to optimize available supply options with the demand side of the business. It gives the opportunity for businesses to divert their manpower, funds, and efforts to products or regions that are doing well.  If the business operates in a single product or serves a single market, this flexibility is not available.
  3. Negotiation power: Cost is an important factor in supply chain. A supply chain that can control its costs has a higher opportunity to improve its bottom line and earn profits. A supply chain that works with multiple suppliers and service providers has more room to negotiate better rates and service contracts as compared to the one that works with a single source or service provider. 
  4. Promotes out of the box thinking: To diversify one has to continuously be on the lookout for new opportunities to differentiate. It can be for a new product mix, design, packaging, supply, or go-to-market strategies. This helps employees develop curiosity, find creative solutions to operational problems and creates a culture of innovation in the organization.

This is just the tip of the iceberg of supply chain diversification. To know more about the topic listen to our webinar: From Chips to Dips in Service? Supply Chain Impact of Diversifying, hosted by Chris Kupillas, VP Sales where they talk about the importance and the challenges of diversifying the supply chain. 

To know how you can improve your supply chain and transportation to keep up with your customers demands, get in touch with our team today! 

The Rise of the 3PL for Managed Transportation Services

Managed transportation services have widely become an integral function of modern supply-chain. As reported by Steve Baker of Forbes, the outsourcing of managed transportation services to other entities has different terminology depending on location. For example, managed transportation or transportation management might be the ideal terms to use in the US. Meanwhile, Europe will refer to the effective outsourcing of transportation management as “fourth-party logistics services (4PL).”

Outsourcing transportation management has the added benefit of taking advantage of external resources and physical assets.

In addition, outsourcing transportation management has the added benefit of taking advantage of external resources and physical assets. However, the aspects of managing transportation are much more profound when looking at the topic from a software standpoint. To understand the rise of the 3PL for managed transportation services, shippers need to understand how managed transportation services became a global power, why 3PLs in managed services work well together, and how 3PLs enable better management of transportation.

Why Managed Transportation Services Grew to Permeate the Global Supply Chain

Take a moment to define managed transportation. According to Chris Cunnane of Logistics Viewpoints, “in a managed transportation services arrangement, a shipper contracts with a third party to plan and execute their moves for them. In other words, instead of having internal planners plan and execute moves, those planners are employed by the MTS supplier, but work on the shipper’s behalf.”

As shippers face the need to ship more and keep costs under control, managed services through a 3PL is the easiest path forward. 

Unlike traditionally maintaining independent transportation management programs in-house, outsourcing the process allows companies to reap a stronger return on investment. In a 2014 survey of supply chain professionals, 9% of respondents saved more than 12% on freight costs through managed transportation services. That number rose to 32% by 2016, and preliminary reports indicate the continued growth of savings. That’s the distinction and primary driving force. As shippers face the need to ship more and keep costs under control, managed services through a 3PL is the easiest path forward. 

3PLs and Managed Services Go Well Together

Part of the rationale for the increased use of 3PLs for managed transportation services surrounds technology and capabilities. In a traditional logistics management approach, an individual shipper must contact carriers, request quotes, understand billing practices, validate invoice details, submit payments, share information from the carrier to this customer and so on.

Leveraging the technology of the 3PL to automate logistics management and effectively outsource the whole process of managing transportation is the gold mine.

While the process works great when the entire supply chain resided in a small town, it becomes grossly ineffective in the modern, e-commerce driven world. With more customers and volume than ever before, shippers need real-time visibility, advanced shipping notifications, increased responsiveness, and faster ways to handle logistics. Working with a 3PL for its basic premise of securing more capacity and lower rates is great. However, leveraging the technology of the 3PL to automate logistics management and effectively outsource the whole process of managing transportation is the gold mine.

Ways 3PLs Excel in Managed Service and Value

Using a 3PL for managed transportation services also allows third-party entities to effectively manage more freight, connect with more carriers, improve supply chain responsiveness, and work together without sacrificing the proprietary information of individual shippers. The various ways 3PLs excel in managed service and value is nothing short of remarkable. In fact, some of the largest managed service providers tend to rely on a unified transportation management system (TMS) that enables continuous growth and power. For those 3PLs that have lagged behind in offering a TMS, recent acquisitions around the industry indicate all larger 3PLs are now looking to deploy better, more reliable TMS capabilities to give all shippers an equal opportunity to leveraged managed services, such as the BlueGrace TMS combined with managed services.

Of course, the real value of managed services lies in the value-added services, such as auditing, accounting management, billing, compliance record keeping, load matching, big data analytics-driven insights, and more. It’s an endless pool of improvement, and 3PLs will continue to maximize service and value without adding to the costs of individual shippers. 

Tap the Value of Managed Freight Transportation Through BlueGrace

BlueGrace is a 3PL that understands the value of managed transportation services. With a strong history of working hand-in-hand with shippers to create customized solutions, and using our BlueShip™ TMS to transform logistics management into a turnkey, automated process. As the value of using a 3PL for managed services increases, BlueGrace will see an influx of more shippers and carriers that are willing to look beyond the company walls and realize stark benefits of using a TMS. Find out more about how to take advantage of BlueGrace’s managed transportation services by calling 800.MY.SHIPPING or completing the form below.