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ltl shipping

The Power Of Using A TMS For Any Size LTL Shipper

A transportation management system (TMS) is traditionally used in larger shipping operations. The benefits of these systems are managing transportation costs and navigating capacity crunches. They can also aid in balancing dynamic customer demands with driver scheduling. 

Small shippers tend to range from 5 to 25 shipments a day. The next step up is mid-sized shippers. Typically, midsized shippers consist of a number of smaller shipping operations across smaller businesses and locations. Usually, their freight consists of all less than truckload or full truckload with a one-off shipment here and there. They negotiate on a shipment by shipment basis, so a TMS is less about freight spend and more about getting the perfect price each time and squeezing more productivity out of shipments. 

Freight plays a prominent role in the reputation of a company. Timely drivers can make a significant impression. But managers also need to know how freight is moving in order to optimize operations, win customers and overcome some of the limitations of being a mid-sized company. 

TMS Adoption Is Low In Mid-Sized Shippers 

Some of the TMS in larger companies focus on things like managing a capacity crunch and optimizing their freight for transportation across various modes. Larger companies have a lot to gain from converting LTLs into truckloads and continuous moves. Since the volumes being handled are mostly one mode for mid-sized companies, there are fewer optimization opportunities from older TMS models. 

One of the barriers to entry for TMS in this sector is the gap between the clear advantage of using technology to manage shipments and the willingness to do so.

TMS is often seen as impractical by smaller and mid-sized shippers. Many managers feel they get their shipments out just fine with their existing practices. One of the barriers to entry for TMS in this sector is the gap between the clear advantage of using technology to manage shipments and the willingness to do so. Mid-sized companies find it too expensive and difficult to implement. It is overwhelming to their budget and operations. They may lack some of the staff necessary to support running a traditional TMS. When a shipper decides to use TMS, there is historically a lot of effort to get all of that data over to the TMS in order to simulate the rates that the carrier has loaded. This process can cost thousands of dollars in paid labor. Every year when the rates change, the process needs to be repeated. EDI setup is a part of this issue. Setting up TMS usually involves establishing EDI for dispatching to schedule pick up, handle tracking, etc… It’s a considerable upfront expense in labor, which is then being passed on to the customer and hurting the shipper’s ability to offer competitive rates. This can put TMS out of reach for smaller to mid-sized shippers. 

TMS can also be complex and intimidating for mid-sized companies whose employees are used to processing their daily tasks via apps, spreadsheets, and websites. 

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Innovations In TMS Accessibility 

Recent advancements in TMS include the prevalence of Application Programming Interface (API) which are essentially programs that can communicate with databases, retrieving useful information that can be used in other applications. Carriers are gaining functionality from their core systems via APIs that other systems can consume. This innovation allows TMS to connect directly to the carrier and pull necessary information directly through machine-to-machine communication. This means there are fewer labor hours spent on back-end issues. It significantly lowers the time and labor investments that keep mid-sized shippers from adopting TMS. 

While a TMS is a powerful tool and typically full of various and helpful features, not every company will need the full suite of options in order for it to be beneficial. In fact, too many features can get in the user’s way. Instead, small and mid-sized shippers should look at carefully curated feature sets for their TMS. Modern TMS solutions are both scalable and customizable, so while an off-the-shelf solution is great for a larger company, this provides a better range of options for smaller companies. With a curated feature package, implementing a TMS becomes a less daunting task.  

An intuitive interface will streamline operations instead of frustrating the employees of mid-sized shippers.

In addition to having it scaled appropriately for your operations, user experience is another consideration. An intuitive interface will streamline operations instead of frustrating the employees of mid-sized shippers. Transparent pricing, next-day readiness, and a subscription model with no end-user IT effort are all attractive offerings of a modern TMS. 

Promising New Options 

Multiple transportation management systems are hitting the market presently, specifically geared towards small to mid-sized shippers. In some, invoices are streamlined via integration to QuickBooks. Attractive features allow carriers to split loads and plan legs of transportation as opportunities unfold. Push notifications keep drivers informed. According to MH&L, “The ability for carriers to connect their ELD providers (to TMS) allows for enhanced visibility for predictive ETAs, integration of Hours of Service information for driver scheduling, and improved location tracking. “ 

In an interview with Fleet Owner, Cody Schmidt, corporate purchasing manager at Plastic Ingenuity, touts his TMS experience. “I’ve seen my team save hours of time and remove many of the manual tasks involved with tendering freight. I’m impressed with how quickly we were able to get set-up within days.” Cody was able to slash time to tender “from three hours to under 15 minutes” by using modern TMS innovations for his mid-sized company. 

Mid-sized companies can create seamless integration by choosing a cloud-based TMS platform that connects directly to their current carriers and 3PL support of choice.

How BlueGrace can Help 

BlueGrace’s proprietary TMS is designed to put the power of easy supply chain management and optimization back in your hands. BlueShip® 4.0 offers cutting-edge tools for strong reliability and quick performance. Our customers are especially impressed with the updated user experience, customer address books and product catalogs that make the entire process of creating new shipments simple and swift. 

The BlueGrace core technology platform enables you to proactively identify opportunities to alleviate costs and optimize your supply chain. BlueShip 4.0 gathers pricing and tracking data from 100’s of our carrier partners nationwide. Our updated LTL Volume solution allows users the ability to see real-time capacity and spot rates for their volume shipments. Our customers also receive access to our expert IT department and a full suite of web services and API’s. 

To learn more about BlueShip and to request a demo to see how our TMS can benefit your company, contact us at 800.MY.SHIPPING or visit us at https://mybluegrace.com.

Outlook for LTL in 2021: A Pressurized Sector

The height of the COVID-19 pandemic forced many businesses to close their doors, in some cases for good. In March and April, during the early days of the “shelter in place” order and red phase, the less-than-truckload (LTL) sector saw a considerable drop in volume, as much as 20 percent.

Within a few months, freight volumes rebounded quickly, leaving carriers struggling to move freight.

Trucking firms, in an effort to keep their own doors open, issued extensive layoffs to compensate for the loss of business. However, within a few months, freight volumes rebounded quickly, leaving carriers struggling to move freight. So much so that some companies had to turn away new business in favor of trying to hire new drivers.  

“All the carriers I talk to are looking for another 100 to 500 drivers,” Satish Jindel, president of transportation research firm SJ Consulting Group, said in an interview with the JOC. “The trucking industry is short 2,000 or more drivers just on the LTL side. That tells you demand is robust. This is a great time for the whole industry and LTL carriers should be operating better in this environment.” 

It is indeed a profitable time for LTL carriers, especially as the demand for e-commerce continues to swell. XPO Logistics, the third-largest stand-alone LTL carrier in the United States, had to lower its adjusted LTL operating ratio to 79.7 percent in Q3, while Old Dominion Freight Line, the second-largest LTL carrier company, lowered their’s down to 74.5. This means that these carriers saw operating profit margins upwards of 25 percent, while most publicly owned LTL carriers are working with operating margins below 10 percent.  

“If XPO and ODFL can do this, there’s no reason others should not be able to,” Jindel says. “The LTL industry should be printing money right now; demand is exceeding capacity.” 

As with other modes of freight transportation, LTL contract rates will continue to climb, but not at the same rate as truckload pricing. LTL shippers and carriers should be expecting increases to remain in the mid to high single digits, whereas FTL freight is seeing double digits. As LTL volumes continue to rise, freight pricing will continue to stay steady throughout the year.  

Jindel said LTL operators “need to get their finances in order so they can reinvest in what’s going to be needed” in 2021. This means hiring more drivers, ordering new equipment, and investing in new technology.  

Beware The Bottlenecks

As it stands, capacity is tight, regardless of what mode a shipper decides to use, be it LTL, FTL, drayage or intermodal rail. Shippers are struggling to find the right fit for their freight needs, even more, to make sure the customer receives that freight on time.  

While the increase in demand makes for lucrative contracts, an overabundance of capacity is just as bad as too little if there isn’t enough equipment to move it.

While the increase in demand makes for lucrative contracts, an overabundance of capacity is just as bad as too little if there isn’t enough equipment to move it. This is being seen it two distinct problems. The first being the pervasive driver shortage in the United States. There simply aren’t enough drivers to fill the number of open seats behind the wheel, which leaves carrier companies competing over the same limited resource.  

The second issue is the amount of time it takes for a trailer to be unloaded. With the massive influx in demand, most big-box retailers are getting more trailers in faster than they can be unloaded, which is problematic. As most LTL carriers have a limited amount of equipment, every trailer that is tied up, waiting to be unloaded, shrinks the total amount of available capacity. 

Shippers Need To Start Planning  

Despite the vaccine rollout, there is no telling how much longer we will continue to experience COVID-19 restrictions. This means that pressure on LTL prices will continue, which could affect shipping budgets.

Unfortunately, due to how turbulent and unprecedented 2020 was, data from years prior is of limited help, shippers will basically have to figure out their shipping budget on the fly this year as we continue to navigate uncharted territory.

As e-commerce demand continues to grow, it is likely that many shippers will continue to see delays in their deliveries, which could be problematic if operating under tighter deadlines or restrictions such as OTIF policies.

In addition to higher prices, shippers will also have to factor in delays, as many carriers are struggling to keep up with the workload. As e-commerce demand continues to grow, it is likely that many shippers will continue to see delays in their deliveries, which could be problematic if operating under tighter deadlines or restrictions such as OTIF policies.

While capacity will remain a challenge, shippers do have some options available to them. One of the best methods is to work with a third-party logistics (3PL) provider. As a leader in LTL, BlueGrace can help you to find the capacity you need when you need it. Contact one of our experts today to get a quote on your next shipment.

The Logistics Of The Super Bowl

Not even COVID can stop what is according to Supply Chain 247  “the world’s most-watched single sporting event”. As Tampa, Florida prepares to host Super Bowl LV, a litany of logistics experts huddle to make sure wardrobes are the most consequential thing malfunctioning on February 7.

Creating A Super Bowl Experience 

Construction materials leading up to hosting a Super Bowl do need to be transported, but a much larger demand on shipping will be from the cultural traditions that football fans hold for the big game. It’s not Super Bowl Sunday without wings, our favorite drinks and every kind of chip dip imaginable!  

Over 1.25 Billion chicken wings, 28 million pounds of potato chips, 54 million avocados and 50 millions cases of beer will be consumed on what is known as the second biggest eating day of the year. 

With an abundance of demand, goods need to arrive on time to avoid shortages and missed opportunity for profits in retail. 

So whether fans make purchases in or near Stadiums, prior to a gathering at home, or out at their favorite sports bar; consumers are ready to spend for the experience. Food, alcohol, apparel, and decorations will all need to be stocked by retailers. With an abundance of demand, goods need to arrive on time to avoid shortages and missed opportunity for profits in retail. 

Meeting Inventory Demands Through Capacity 

The most important and often the most challenging problem in fulfillment is last-mile delivery. If disaster is going to strike with a carrier, the largest impact this can have is during the transfer from distribution center to storefront. Distribution centers cannot order perishable items too far in advance.  However, if an inbound load is late to the distribution center, stores have the option to order other items from their distribution inventory while still receiving their in demand non-perishables. With interruptions in last-mile delivery, consumables may not reach the shelves in time for the big game surge in purchasing. Retailers do not like losing profits and market share.  

Carriers want to focus on accurate projections in order to make best-fit decisions between FTL and LTL. FTL options are enticing due to their lower spot rates, however LTLs can have a significant cost-benefit advantage when expediting a load is the priority. Unfortunately, carriers can lose the gamble with FTL.  When shippers are in a crunch for time and need to get a load sent out, even if it’s a partial, they may end up paying FTL rates instead of LTL rates, which tend to be decidedly cheaper for the volume of freight being shipped. 

Luckily, resources like visibility and real-time notifications mean that making choices for a reliable supply chain don’t have to feel like betting the farm.

Since retailers are not likely to forget the bad taste in their mouths left by coming up short during a high sales annual event, it may benefit freighters to make the safe wager on last-mile delivery by booking LTL. Luckily, resources like visibility and real-time notifications mean that making choices for a reliable supply chain don’t have to feel like betting the farm. With transparency through technology from BlueGrace, you can take a move out of the NFL’s own Frank Supovitz’s handbook and be prepared for anything this Super Bowl Sunday. 

Do you have questions about your LTL or FTL? Are you curious if you might need help optimizing either for them for your “big game”? Contact our logistics experts at BlueGrace Logistics today and let’s talk more.

Understanding The Need For A Stronger Supply Chain

As much as we’d like to believe that our supply chains are both quick enough to react to major disruption and flexible enough to maneuver around major obstacles, the global pandemic has taught us that often isn’t the case. It is the single major weakness of most supply chains, an inability to react to a sudden and massive large-scale disruption, which can include pandemics (such as Covid-19) massive weather events, and a myriad of other setbacks. This lack of resiliency is most notable in supply chains for life sciences, health care, and food industries in particular.

The Chinese market is massive, for one thing, and most companies can’t afford to withdraw completely, otherwise, they might lose any competitive edge they might have had.

After COVID broke loose around the world, the current administration issued a call for companies that have offshored their production to Asia, (China, in particular) to bring it back stateside. However, for many companies, this proves to be challenging and counterproductive. The Chinese market is massive, for one thing, and most companies can’t afford to withdraw completely, otherwise, they might lose any competitive edge they might have had. Additionally, because the Chinese market is now either the dominant, if not sole source, for thousands of different items, reducing the dependence on those goods will take a significant amount of both time and money.

Reshoring wouldn’t necessarily mean resiliency either. The meat shortage in the United States is a perfect example of this. The industry’s supply chain is entirely domestic. In an attempt to reduce costs, many companies focused on consolidating manufacturing activities, which means a smaller number of slaughter and processing plants are now producing much of the beef and pork products consumed in the United States. This created a vulnerability as shutting down one plant, even for a few weeks, creates a major impact throughout the country. Farmers, who get paid to raise the feedstock, are now stuck with taking a potentially devastating loss on their products while the rest of the country faces months of meat shortages.

Remap instead of Retreat

Instead of retreating outright from the forign market, the best approach to building resilience into the supply chain is by conducting an internal audit. More specifically it’s the process of mapping out the layers of suppliers, manufacturing plants, distributors, and the other various elements of the logistics network and then implementing a stress test to evaluate the ability to recover from the disruption of any of the various links. Understanding where various bottlenecks will occur means being able to create mitigation strategies which can include increasing manufacturing capabilities, adding more suppliers to the roster, or building up buffer stock.

The added advantage to mapping and stress testing the supply chain is that companies using this method can find unexpected weaknesses or high risks throughout the organization. The more complex the produced good is, the higher the risk of utter disruption.

“Work that one of us (David) did with the Ford Motor Company found unexpected high risk associated with small suppliers, including many local suppliers. One part it identified that fell into this category was a low-cost sensor widely used in its vehicles: If the supply of it were disrupted, the carmaker would need to shut down its manufacturing operations. Because the total amount spent on this item was low, Ford’s procurement group had not paid much attention to it,” reads a recent article from HBR.

Stress Testing on a Policy Level

Essential industries, such as pharmaceuticals and health care, need to have a level of government involvement to ensure that supply chains are resilient enough to continue operating, even during the worst-case scenario. Consider the mask and hospital supply shortage when the pandemic first started to hit the United States. While panic buying created part of the problem, the supply chain itself faltered and eventually failed under the crushing demand.

If such a test can be conducted for banks, it can similarly be conducted for all life-critical supply chains.

There is a precedent for such involvement, however. Back in 2008, during the recession, the U.S. government and the European Union conducted a stress test for banks to guarantee that the major financial institutions that prop up the entire financial system, could survive a major crisis. If such a test can be conducted for banks, it can similarly be conducted for all life-critical supply chains.

The Long Road to Resiliency

Creating supply chain resilience for essential products and services here in the United States could very well require domestic manufacturing. But that’s neither an easy nor cheap fix. Take the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Of the drugs sold in Europe, more than 80% of the required chemical components are manufactured in China and India. Because chemical production is a significant environmental hazard, it would require the development of clean technology and manufacturing processes to create a domestic supply chain. This process could take upwards of 10 years and would require a hefty financial investment. Could it be done? Absolutely. But not easy, and not cheap.

However, until companies have a full comprehension of the vulnerabilities throughout their supply chain, these kinds of decisions can’t be made. The pandemic has created an excellent opportunity and, perhaps more importantly, a motive to put in the necessary time, energy, and resources. Only then can they protect their supply chain from a potential devastating disruption that may be lurking on the horizon.

Do you have supply chain questions that you need answered? Do you need help bolstering your current supply chain to handle these new and disruptive global situations? Feel free to contact one of our logistics experts today and lets talk more about it today.

Detention and Dwell Times: The Menaces of Supply Chain Efficiency

Prolonged dwell times have been an age-old inefficiency that the trucking industry has been trying to curb. Longer dwell times affect the drivers, carriers and shippers alike. An estimated detention time or dwell time can cost trucking companies $3 billion per year as per the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

The total time spent at a facility by a driver is called dwell time while detention is the gap between the allocated time to start loading/unloading and the actual time of loading/unloading. Longer detention at customers’ premises has largely impacted drivers’ available hours-of-service. Ideally, shippers and receivers are allowed a 2-hour window to load or unload a truck. Any time spent outside the allotted time calls for detention charges. Detention is thus used to offset the cost of a truck being detained at a shipper or receiver’s premises.

Dwell time in unprecedented times – A challenge

The month of March saw an unprecedented rise in panic-buying, which resulted in a tremendous spike in demand. The truckers continued to ply on the highways, making essentials available throughout regions. With increased demand, came the perils of heightened dwell times and detention times. The added safety protocols, social distancing, precautionary SOPs to be followed at the shipper and consignee facilities and the shortage of manpower had considerably impacted the driver detention times. On the other hand, transit times may have improved, owing to less traffic congestion during the lockdown period.

Improvement in the check-in process, ensuring social distancing, enhancing driver safety and the use of technology to manage appointments and improve collaboration between all parties have been the key drivers of change.

Improvement in the check-in process, ensuring social distancing, enhancing driver safety and the use of technology to manage appointments and improve collaboration between all parties have been the key drivers of change. While the world adapts to the new normal in supply chains, it is of utmost importance that more sustainable solutions are innovated and implemented.

Detention: Causes and Impact

Inefficiencies at the facility such as the lack of manpower to load and unload consignments, the unwillingness of the shippers or consignors to invest in manpower to accommodate increased freight movement and the inability at the individual level are the main reasons for increased detention durations. Additionally, mismanagement of appointment times such as goods not being ready for dispatch while the vehicle arrives at the premises lead to unwanted delays. Another common reason is the overbooking of appointments – when more trucks are booked than what the loading location can handle. All of the above contribute to increased detention times, which in turn amounts to losses for truck drivers. On average, truck drivers spend two and a half hours waiting at the shipper or receiver premises to load or unload goods. These hours are not considered as working hours, thus, leaving them unpaid.

We need to understand that most of the drivers are paid on a per-mile basis, therefore, every moment lost in delays is a direct loss of income for drivers.

We need to understand that most of the drivers are paid on a per-mile basis, therefore, every moment lost in delays is a direct loss of income for drivers. On the other hand, for LTL carriers, waiting at a certain facility for longer durations can mean skipping the delivery altogether.

As per a  2018 report published by the Department of Transportation Officer of the Inspector General (OIG) that sought to understand the correlation between driver detention times, crash risks and costs incurred, it was found that detention time may impact annual earnings for truck drivers by $1,281 to $1,534 per year in the negative. Shippers of essential goods have experienced longer detention times at facilities lately. For example, the recent crisis of toilet paper around the nation had trucks lining up at facilities for hours before being loaded with goods. Detention fees paid by shippers to carriers can only offset the loss up to an extent but that money fails to cover the driver wages lost by not driving. Primarily, the carrier efficiency and a driver’s payable hours-of-service are at stake, but the effects of longer detention times invariably trickle down to every stakeholder across the supply chain.

Is there a long term solution – that can increase efficiency, while ensuring optimum asset utilization and prioritizing driver safety in times of crisis?

Longer dwell times and increased detention times are not a byproduct of the current economic crisis alone. They have lingered in the industry for quite some time now and only technology can help provide long term solutions to enhance supply chain visibility. In a recent statement by Collins White, the president of Alabama Motor Express, he stated, “It has become progressively worse since 2018. We have bought software that automatically tracks when the truck goes over the allotted two hours of dwell time and automatically bills the customer.” Better technology that tracks the movement of trucks with a precise estimation of time spent at shipper or receiver facilities will help us give a clearer picture of the spots where the detention is taking place. Identifying these spots will further enable a better understanding of bottlenecks, allow correct allocation of resources and change practices to streamline the flow wherever necessary.

On the other hand, the tried and tested drop-trailer business model may have worked for some quite well. In the drop trailer method, a driver leaves a trailer at the facility for a stipulated time period until another vehicle picks it up. This doesn’t time-bound the shippers and they can load trailers at their convenience. Given the current situation of restricted labor availability, this method comes as an interim respite but cannot be considered as an all-round solution to the problem.

Investing in data-enabled technology is necessary to be able to make any supply chain more robust and induce complete visibility.

Investing in data-enabled technology is necessary to be able to make any supply chain more robust and induce complete visibility. Location Intelligence (LI) is set to make location data more accessible to participants in a supply chain. The use of LI is a promising trend as it uses geographical relationships to decipher complex data that can provide fleets with critical insights of accurate detention time calculations. It can provide accurate information such as time of arrival and departure of a truck at a site. They can also monitor a driver’s fuel stop time or break times which can further help enhance asset utilization. Insights into trends pertaining to a particular time of a day or week can translate to better prediction of transit times and estimated time of deliveries. All of these are elemental in aiding data-enabled business decisions through optimized route planning with reduced dwell times that boost overall productivity and enhance supply chain performance.

As the nation grapples with the ongoing economic crisis, a sudden surge in demand followed by flattening of the curve, the unpredictable rise of freight volumes and its correlation with increasing or decreasing dwell and detention times remain a cause of concern. What must not be forgotten is that these problems of detention and dwell times pose the opportunity for a permanent change towards creating a symbiotic relationship between carriers and shippers. There is an immense potential for cost savings and enhanced operational efficiency that will invariably impact the driver community’s way of life on the road.

Controlling Costs and Preventing Accessorial Loss

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Controlling costs is critical for any business to be successful. When working with a supply chain, the more complex it is, the more chances there are for additional costs and surcharges, any of which can cost your company a great deal of extra money.

They are any freight services that go beyond the normal scope of pickup and delivery.  

Accessorial charges are a particular type of surcharge. They are any freight services that go beyond the normal scope of pickup and delivery. This can include inside or special delivery charges, waiting or detention time, fuel surcharges, storage fees, and many others. Given the way the freight market is changing, especially due to the rise and continual growth of e-commerce, many companies are looking to a more specialized version of last mile delivery as customers want their products sooner rather than later. The “white glove” last mile service, while costly, is growing increasingly important as customer service is becoming one of the last true differentiators among the competition.  

In our webinar, we covered the basics and most common questions of accessorial charges which include:  

  • What are accessorials? 
  • How do they affect cost? 
  • How do they affect supply chain efficiency? 
  • How can we mitigate problems? 
  • How do we know if we have a problem? 

Consumers want their product today, that means that retailers want it delivered, checked in, and on the shelf yesterday.

Logistics and supply chain management has become a very tight game, almost cutthroat in its harsh severity. Consumers want their product today, that means that retailers want it delivered, checked in, and on the shelf yesterday. With the ability to order just about anything a consumer could possibly want from the vast online marketplace, brick and mortar retailers have to run an even tighter ship than they have before if they have any hopes of competing. To that end, some retailers are upping the ante and doling out punishment for shippers who aren’t in compliance.  

WHAT ARE ACCESSORIALS?  

As we mentioned above, accessorials are extra charges associated with freight delivery that fall outside simple pick up and delivery. We gave a few examples above, but those are by no means the only accessorial charges that you could be stuck paying. Here are some other types of common accessorial charges.  

  • Reweigh
  • Limited Access
  • Liftgate
  • Residential delivery
  • Appointment / Notify
  • Sort & Segregate
  • Hazardous Materials

While inaccurate weighing of freight could be a result of an honest mistake, the cost of that mistake can add up quickly.

It’s important to control and monitor as many of these as possible to help control costs. Consider reweigh charges for example. When a carrier weighs freight and compares the actual weight to what’s listed on the bill of lading, the difference can be instantly tacked on to the invoice. For shipments that are 50 pounds or more over what the bill of lading states, there is a $25.00 validation fee as well as an increase to shipping costs. Additionally, all freight fees, fuel surcharge fees, and any other applicable accessorial fees will be adjusted accordingly. While inaccurate weighing of freight could be a result of an honest mistake, the cost of that mistake can add up quickly.

HOW ACCESSORIAL FEES CAN AFFECT YOUR SUPPLY CHAIN  

One way to better control accessorial charges is to have a more efficient and agile supply chain. Detention fees are a prime example of where efficiency pays off. For the LTL market, every shipment has a set amount of free time per stop before the charges start being applied. While this is based on weight, meaning that heavier shipments have more time, it can be hard to gauge just how long each stop is going to take which leaves your company exposed to detention fees.  

Another thing to consider is that the ELD mandate severely limits the amount of working time a driver has available. The longer it takes to load and unload freight can cause delivery delays and will ultimately increase the price of a shipment. Once you start adding detention fees onto the bill it can quickly become more expensive than you were initially anticipating. 

It’s critical to have your supply chain running smoothly and efficiently.

Because of this, it’s critical to have your supply chain running smoothly and efficiently. Not only does it increase the chances that you will make your delivery schedule, but having a more efficient operation makes you a more attractive customer to carriers (which increases the likelihood of getting the capacity you need) as well as helping to control shipping costs.  

LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW YOU CAN MANAGE ACCESSORIAL CHARGES   

When it comes to controlling costs, the more you understand about extra fees the better off you’ll be. Because many of these accessorial charges can compound and complicate others, it’s important to understand the full workings of your supply chain and identify any potential problems before they arise.  

The truth of the matter is that the more you understand your freight and the way your carrier works, the more accessorial fees you can either reduce or negate entirely. Many of these fees won’t even enter into the picture so long as the shipper is taking the time to make sure they’re doing things right. Doing this means preventing the issue before it even begins. On the other hand, if your freight invoice is coming as a bit of a shock, it might be time to take a closer look at the surcharges and determine what you can you do to correct the issue.  

Ultimately, everything we covered in the webinar is about helping your company to manage these fees and perform better across the board. From internal operations to external executions, everything is connected and we break it down for you. Watch the full webinar to learn more about how you can be successful!

There are a number of other benefits that can come from working with and outsourcing your logistics to a 3PL. If you would like to speak to one of our experts, call us at 800.MYSHIPPING or fill out the form below.

Driving Down Supply Chain Costs with Mode Optimization

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The term “optimization” is thrown around often in the logistics landscape. It’s true, optimization is an indispensable part of a well-run business model. Of course, every business owner wants their operations running as tightly and efficiently as possible, but the footwork required to determine how to optimize your business’s operations and see tangible results is often easier said than done.  

Our Webinar discusses the typical LTL network and differentiates between less than truckload (LTL) and full truckload and the factors companies should consider when deciding which alternative is best for a particular shipment.

In our Webinar “Driving Down Supply Chain Costs with Mode Optimization,” Brian Blalock, Senior Manager of Sourcing Strategy at BlueGrace, discusses the typical LTL network and differentiates between less than truckload (LTL) and full truckload and the factors companies should consider when deciding which alternative is best for a particular shipment. Both have their advantages and weaknesses, but one may suit the business better depending on the kind of freight being transported, the location or origin and destination. While the decision is sometimes considered arbitrary, in order to optimize your operation, i.e. lower cost and maximize profit, it is crucial to consider the following factors. 

LTL vs. Full Truckload

LTL shipments must be 12 linear feet or less, usually 5000 pounds or less, and are “typically consolidated with other freight from other shippers,” Blalock said, continuing that they are identified by class and that the structure, and that pricing can be very complex because it is determined by product class, distance and weight. Typically, it costs less than a full truckload, an obvious appeal to any shipper. 

Fewer claims of damage occur with truckloads than with LTLs.

Fewer claims of damage occur with truckloads than with LTLs. “Why?” One might ask. It’s simple. Blalock uses the example of witnessing luggage being boarded into the belly of an aircraft; people rarely handle a stranger’s items as gently as they would their own. In conclusion, the “less handling of freight, the less damage to the freight,” Blalock says. Since LTLs require more stops and handling, more damage is incurred to LTL freight than full truckload on average. 

When shipping a full truckload, your freight is the only thing on the trailer, so transit time is only contingent upon the required breaks for drivers and the time between pickup and delivery locations. The freight never has to leave the truck because it travels directly to its destination, so truckload shipments tend to arrive faster than LTL shipments, while at the same time, incurring less damage. 

When to Not Ship LTL?

LTL loads should be the choice for shippers dealing in smaller quantities at a time as carriers charge by weight and volume, but may not be the optimal choice at every juncture. In order to determine which mode is right for your operation, create business and shipping rules around factors like weight, volume, time constraints, and cargo sensitivity of your shipments. You need to consider the rate at which damage may occur in your LTL shipments. How much does it really end up costing you at the end of the day? In knowing this information, you will be better able to decide in which case you need to opt for a full truckload, and which you are able to go with an LTL. 

If the margins are tight on your product, the last thing you want is another cost eating away at your bottom line.

Another key is understanding how business decisions affect OTIF (on time in full). “If you ship to Walmart you can’t show up late, you can’t show up early, and you can’t show up incomplete,” Blalock said. “Any of those that you do, typically, [are] about a 3% ding to the cost of the entire invoice.” If the margins are tight on your product, the last thing you want is another cost eating away at your bottom line. “Likewise, if you continue to not hit your dates, you’ll find that you can lose valuable shelf position, and you won’t be shipping to Walmart anymore.” Blalock says to consider using different carriers for different shippers to this end: “The choices that you build into your business rules include choosing the right type of carrier every time,” he said.  

Supply Chain Engineering

“Understand that we are following the linear rules of the carriers,” Blalock says. “Build the rules of your freight around your tariffs.” Blanket rate pricing main type associated with the LTL market. Customer specific pricing is negotiated on your behalf when all of your capacity is going to a single provider, which is typically preferred for shippers with a larger freight spend. BlueGrace negotiates specifically customer-by-customer to determine which suites the customer better. “If you’re in Montana or the upper peninsula of Michigan, sometimes you may just want to pay the more expensive LTL cost,” he said, due to the fact that market is more remote, and competition between carriers is less apparent. 

Identifying consolidation opportunities is the key to the cost-reducing aspect of optimizations.

Identifying consolidation opportunities is the key to the cost-reducing aspect of optimizations. BlueGrace’s software is designed to help clients consolidate unnecessary costs in their unique supply chains. One measure that BlueGrace uses is a center of gravity study, which considers various origin points and points of destination and calculates where each region should ship from to find the fastest route at the best cost. “You want to be able to take advantage of the ability to choose the right mode every time and drive down costs. If all things are equal, an FTL is going to travel much faster … and [incur] less damage to freight,” Blalock said. “If time is no issue, if the freight is indestructible,” then LTL could be the best option for you. 

Click HERE to watch the full Webinar and learn more about tariffs and fuel surcharges associated with costs. If you would like to speak to one of our freight experts, contact us at 800.MYSHIPPING or fill out the form below.

 

Walmart’s OTIF Policy Gets Harder 

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On Time In Full is a policy that Walmart created back in 2016 and implemented in August of 2017. In an attempt to drive their proficiency up and costs down, the mega retail chain started targeting their supply chain. Under this policy, suppliers that failed to deliver the total amount of promised goods, to designated stores at the prescribed time are penalized; fined up to three percent of the total shipment value.  

The shipment has to arrive exactly when it’s expected. Not before, and certainly not after.  

It’s not just trying to curb late deliveries, either. The OTIF policy also cracks down on trucks arriving too early, as it can create excess traffic and delays for loading and unloading. For suppliers and trucking companies, this means there’s no leaving early to create a buffer zone. The shipment has to arrive exactly when it’s expected. Not before, and certainly not after.   

In addition to making things more challenging for suppliers to make sure their goods arrive on time, it will bring even more stress on carriers – we discussed this in more detail in our earlier post. With the Electronic Logging Device more closely monitoring hours of service, truckers will be in a tight spot when it comes to making sure that deliveries arrive exactly when they’re supposed to, all while making sure to stay compliant with their working hours.  

A Tough Policy Gets Tougher 

As of April 1st of this year, the company made the policy even harder. Prior to this month, the OTIF policy stated that full truckload shipments needed to meet a 75 percent OTIF rating and less-than-truckload shipments needed to meet 33 percent OTIF to avoid fines. Now, FTL’s are required to meet an 85 percent standard (down from the lofty 95 percent they had originally planned) while LTL requirements have increased to 36 percent.

Keeping products on the shelf is the name of the game for Walmart.

Keeping products on the shelf is the name of the game for Walmart. With increased competition from the likes of Target, Dollar General, and Amazon, the more items Walmart can keep in stock, the less likely they are to lose out to the competition.  

A Necessary Change 

While it’s easy to paint Walmart in a bad light through this policy, they aren’t the only company to enforce such a policy. Competition stores like Target, Kroger, and Walgreens also have similar OTIF policies. If retailers don’t hold the supplier accountable and they don’t make them try to comply, then suppliers can cause backlogs.

With the 90 percent failure rate for full and timely deliveries, Walmart has found a rather convenient way to turn a problem into profit.

According to a Bloomberg report, Walmart had a OTIF success rate hovering around a dismal 10 percent. With the 90 percent failure rate for full and timely deliveries, Walmart has found a rather convenient way to turn a problem into profit. This new policy doesn’t cost the company a dime. In addition to generating money from the fines, increased product availability will also mean increased in-store sales.  

Given that Walmart is such a heavy hitter for suppliers, suppliers will have little choice but to either comply or lose out on some considerable business. With the extra revenue generation, Walmart can take that money and reinvest in its e-commerce business.  

A Hard Place for Small Suppliers 

While larger companies have no problem meeting delivery quotas, it’s the LTL deliveries that are going to take the brunt of the OTIF policy. Considering the strained nature of supply chain as it is, especially in the trucking sector. ELD and HoS mandates are pitting truckers against the clock as it stands. Couple that with the driver shortage and rising demand for LTL, and capacity becomes even more limited.   

Couple that with the driver shortage and rising demand for LTL, and capacity becomes even more limited.   

At least in that regard, the company has cut smaller suppliers a little slack, which is the reason that LTL shipments have less than half the requirements of their FTL counterparts. An LTL doesn’t schedule a delivery to a Walmart [distribution center] until the freight arrives at the terminal.

In order to avoid hefty fines being levied by Walmart and other retailers such as Kroger and Walgreens, suppliers are going to have to tighten and fine tune their logistics and supply chain considerably, especially given the current tight capacity environment.  

Do You Need Help With OTIF Issues?

A 3PL, such as BlueGrace, can help your business overcome the challenges of OTIF and other supply chain issues. If you have questions about OTIF or just how to simplify your current transportation program, feel free to contact us via phone at 800.MY.SHIPPING or using the form below and we will be happy to assist.

 

What is Volume LTL Shipping?

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Businesses who ship product and carriers looking to maximize business revenue have come to embrace Volume LTL shipping.

The simplest explanation is volume LTL provides many of the benefits of truck load (TL) or partial TL with the cost savings associated with less than truckload (LTL). It’s a win-win for everyone.

 It’s a win-win for everyone.

A Quick Definition: A shipment greater than 5,000 lbs, 6 pallets or more and taking up 12 to 32 linear feet of trailer space qualifies as Volume LTL. Although sometimes referred to as partial truckload, volume LTL has distinct size requirements and does need product crated or on pallets, not a requirement for partial TL shipments. If the shipment will take up 20% or more of the trailer, volume LTL may be the way to go.

Volume LTL has distinct size requirements and does need product crated or on pallets

Why Customers Like It?

With Volume LTL, a business only pays the going rate for the space the freight uses and the total weight of the shipment along the shipping lane. This generally results in a lower cost to ship. Plus, shipments get out the door faster, usually same day and there’s a lot less risk of damage for freight. (Freight goes from dock to dock much like partial or full TL, not getting off-loaded at different terminals like standard LTL shipments.)

A business only pays the going rate for the space the freight uses and the total weight of the shipment

Why Shippers Like it?

Shipping companies get more business, more quickly. The daily demand for volume shipping continues to grow as companies look to reduce shipping costs by shipping greater volumes. Shippers do not need to turn down requests for those not-quite-partial TLs. Plus, volume LTL increases the loads on all runs – no more driving empty trucks home, making every trip profitable.

The daily demand for volume shipping continues to grow

Does Volume LTL Replace standard LTL Freight?

Not at all. Volume LTL makes sense for a lot of companies who need to ship products; and for many asset-based carriers looking to expand their business. Standard LTL freight offered by common carriers will continue to meet the needs of businesses in terms of costs, shipment size (5 pallets and smaller) and speed of getting product out the door each and every day.

Volume LTL makes sense for a lot of companies who need to ship products

A Real Win-Win!

Volume LTL allows companies to quickly ship larger volumes of product at lower costs. Win!
It allows shipping companies, especially asset-based carriers, to increase the profitability of every run; plus, it expands market exposure for greater revenues. Win! And both groups benefit from faster agreements (Click. Book. Ship.) and quicker pickups.

This means companies get their product delivered more quickly and shipping companies keep the revenue flowing!

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Volume Quotes: Improving processes and turn around times

2013 is a much anticipated year of tremendous process improvements which include getting our customers the information they need faster, more efficiently and with more accuracy. With that said, our customers can now take advantage of our new volume quoting process. You no longer have to wait for a volume quote when booking your shipments. Our new processes allows anyone to get a volume quote with the same speed as an LTL Quote! No more waiting 30-45 minutes, hoping that your customers expectations have ceased on your behalf to deliver. Our new process increases our response time and we are proud to say we can over-deliver volume quoting shipping needs with the same expectations of a standard LTL shipment! Click here for details on differentiating standard LTL shipping with Volume Shipping. 

Time is of the essence and we get that better than anyone else in the business. With our new volume quoting density calculator, combined with the power of the TMS Rate Shop we can provide you with pricing in less than 2 minutes!  The new calculator takes in consideration one very important factor: CUBIC CAPACITY

We’re providing our customers with a quick estimate, reducing turnaround time significantly and giving them more options with more carriers. They will be able to acquire more customers with this new process because the time for them to shop will be reduced significantly and will see that less people will need to be involved with overall operations. Everyone understands that price is a determining factor in sales processes across all industries, but we give our customers an opportunity to sell on value.

To take advantage of our new process there are several things you can do. For more information or to get a quote over the phone call 800.MY.SHIPPING, or send an email to [email protected] You can also ask to request a BlueShip TMS account . When calling to get a quote make sure you have the weight, dimensions and piece count of your shipment(s) available in addition to your pickup and delivery destinations.

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