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Roadcheck Week is Coming: May 4-6

Roadcheck week is a program created by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) which will deploy inspectors across the country to ensure that commercial vehicles and their drivers are upholding the set safety standards. Every year, the CVSA chooses a focus for their inspections, typically based on the past year’s violations. Last year, in 2020, it was driver violations. This year, they will be focusing on the top vehicle maintenance issues and driver violations from 2020 which were vehicle lighting and hours-of-service compliance.  

CVSA President Sgt. John Samis, who is also with the Delaware State Police, said in a CVSA statement that there is an element of business as usual during Roadcheck Week. “The inspections conducted during the three days of International Roadcheck are no different from the inspections conducted any other day of the year,” he said. “Other than data collection, the inspection process is the same.

Shippers will need to take Roadcheck week into account when planning their freight movement.  

While Roadcheck week is an important safety measure to ensure unfit vehicles and drivers aren’t in operation (and a risk to the public) it does pose a serious issue in terms of how it affects the available capacity and market spot rates. Shippers will need to take Roadcheck week into account when planning their freight movement.  

2021 Inspection Criteria  

Inoperable lamps were the top vehicle violation in 2020, accounting for 12.24 percent of all vehicle inspection failures discovered for the entire year, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.  

Inspectors will also be checking the vehicle’s brake systems, cargo securement, coupling devices, driveline/driveshaft components, driver’s seat, exhaust systems, frames, fuel systems, lighting devices, steering mechanisms, suspensions, tires, van and open-top trailer bodies, wheels, rims, hubs and windshield wipers to ensure all meet the necessary specifications. 

For drivers, hours-of-service violations reached nearly 34.7 percent of all driver-related concerns. During the inspection, inspectors will check the driver’s operating credentials, hours-of-service documentation, seat belt usage and for alcohol and/or drug impairment. A driver will be placed out of service if an inspector discovers driver-related out-of-service conditions. 

Any vehicle found with a “critical vehicle inspection item violation” will be considered out-of-service, meaning the vehicle cannot be operated until the condition has been corrected and re-inspected.  

In light of the importance of COVID-19 vaccine transportation, any vehicle caring vaccines will not be held up for inspection, unless there is an obvious and serious violation that could be considered an imminent hazard.  

Successfully passing the inspection will earn the vehicle and driver a CVSA decal. During the three-month period that the decal is valid, both driver and vehicle will not be subjected to subsequent inspections. In light of the importance of COVID-19 vaccine transportation, any vehicle caring vaccines will not be held up for inspection, unless there is an obvious and serious violation that could be considered an imminent hazard.  

“CVSA shares the dates of International Roadcheck in advance to remind motor carriers and drivers of the importance of proactive vehicle maintenance and driver readiness,” Samis said. “International Roadcheck also aims to raise awareness of the North American Standard Inspection Program and the essential highway safety rules and regulations in place to keep our roadways safe.” 

Roadcheck Week Causes Volume Drop and Capacity Fluctuation 

While the program is designed to keep both truck drivers and other motorists safe, it also comes with an unintended consequence. During Roadcheck week, the Outbound Tender Volume Index (OTVI) drops precipitously, causing a shortage in both transportation volume as well as fluctuations in available capacity.  

In 2020, during the inspection blitz, OTVI fell from over 16,125 down to 13,628. The only other times during the course of the year it has been lower was over the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays.  

Typically speaking as OTVI climbs, capacity gets tighter as it suggests that more loads are being tendered on a daily basis. That being said, a drop in OTVI would suggest more available capacity, but that may not be the case. As drivers and vehicles are flagged as out-of-service, the overall operational capacity, nationwide, could be affected. Given the immediate needs of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, capacity is already stretched thin, especially for dry van and reefer units given the storage requirements of the vaccines. 

Many drivers prefer to avoid Roadcheck week altogether and opt to take vacation during this time which causes a temporary disruption in capacity and thins out the already shallow pool of available drivers.

Additionally, many drivers prefer to avoid Roadcheck week altogether and opt to take vacation during this time which causes a temporary disruption in capacity and thins out the already shallow pool of available drivers. With fewer available drivers and more shippers turning to the spot market to find available capacity, rates could increase 

Shippers, in particular, will need to keep a close eye on the OTVI during the beginning of May as it could affect both spot rates as well as overall transportation time. It is important that shippers begin considering their options now as Roadcheck week will soon be upon us. 

Tips for Becoming a More Strategic Shipper

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While there are a lot of buzzwords in the logistics industry, it may be surprising to some but “business strategy” is not among them. Every company needs a strong plan of approach and a method of conducting business that will put them in a more advantageous position. Successful companies understand that good strategy isn’t about just doing better than the “other guy” but also about not hindering themselves in the process.

One of the biggest ways that shipping companies tend to shoot themselves in the foot is by looking at their carriers as a resource rather than an asset.

One of the biggest ways that shipping companies tend to shoot themselves in the foot is by looking at their carriers as a resource rather than an asset. Being a preferred or “shipper of choice” is one of the best ways to shore up your strategy to make you more profitable today, next week, next year, in five years and years after that.

With the dwindling supply of able-bodied drivers, the relationship between shipper and carrier is more important than ever before. Here are a few things to consider when it comes to attaining that status with your carriers and carrier conduct in general.

Move to an Integrated Supply Chain

One of the worst carryovers from the inception of the logistics industry is that aspect of the business is thought of as a separate entity, a cost center. By siloing these facets rather than integrating them, it’s easy to lose cohesion and efficiency.

For a shipper, every part of their business is (and should be) connected.

For a shipper, every part of their business is (and should be) connected. Your sales team is just as important as those in the warehouse or operating the dock. Even if those are all considered to be connected and are even working as a complete unit, transportation is no less a part of that. All too often, shippers look at their carriers as an afterthought and opt not to include them in the larger operations discussions as well as providing information to them at the last possible minute.

“When an order arrives, ideally the information shouldn’t only be broadcast to inventory folks and the distribution center. The information should immediately go to the transportation group so they can start to coordinate the capacity to move that freight. Too often transportation folks are only notified when the pallets are sitting on the docks,” said Brian Gibson, executive director of the Center for Supply Chain Innovation at Auburn University

While cutting down on the transportation budget might save a little cash up front, it could (and often does) have an impact on other facets of your business.

Of course, the cost is a factor in this regard. While cutting down on the transportation budget might save a little cash up front, it could (and often does) have an impact on other facets of your business. Disconnect and poor communication with a transporter tend to end up costing more in the long run with delays, detention fees, poor customer service, annoyed carriers, unsatisfied customers.

Do Unto Others

The golden rule certainly has its place in the business world and unfortunately, not all shippers and carriers have learned to get along as they should. Pricing is the perpetual thorn in the side, of course, and it’s easy for one side or the other to take advantage when the conditions are right. The “us-against-them” mentality may be useful when it comes to thinking about the competition, but it really has no place when you’re working with a carrier. Treating carriers poorly can have some serious consequences in the future.

Think about 2016 and 2017 when shippers could harangue carriers for a better rate and carriers had no option but to comply. In 2018, when demand was high enough for carriers to be more picky on what freight they carried, the worst of the antagonizers were either dropped or gouged when it came to the bill.

Trucking companies might put up with it when demand is low and they have no choice, but don’t think they won’t drop a company as soon as capacity picks back up.

Build a Good Working Relationship with Carriers

Remember, carriers, just as you as a shipper, are in the game to make money. For them, profit comes when they are more productive, so getting their drivers in, out, and on the road to the next delivery is key. However, when a driver is delayed, that puts a hurting on their productivity and ultimately their bottom line.

One of the best ways you can help to strengthen your working relationship is to ask your carriers to audit your supply chain and make suggestions and recommendations on how to make it more efficient.

One of the best ways you can help to strengthen your working relationship is to ask your carriers to audit your supply chain and make suggestions and recommendations on how to make it more efficient. While detention fees might help to recoup some of the losses from a delay, remember, carriers would much rather keep their drivers moving instead.

Looking Ahead

While we might not be able to predict the future precisely, shippers are able to put together a forecast of what they’ve got coming down the pipeline for deliveries. Communicating that information with carriers ahead of time not only helps to ensure there’s capacity available, but it also makes life considerably easier for both parties and strengthens the relationship at the same time.

Trucking companies like to know what’s coming down the line, more to the point, they like to have shipments lined up so they can keep their trucks moving. If they aren’t expecting anything from you, then they’ll look for freight elsewhere. While that’s a good move on their part, it doesn’t do a shipper any favors when they have freight that needs to get on the road.

One thing to remember is that the more communication you have with your carriers the better the relationship will be and the more reliable the service.

Small to midsize companies will typically make forecasts on a three week or monthly basis while larger companies will run a two-week forecast. Regardless of the number of days or week, though the one thing to remember is that the more communication you have with your carriers the better the relationship will be and the more reliable the service. The optimal goal is to have continuous service with the same carrier pool. This not only helps to build a more stable rapport with the carriers, but it’s mutually beneficial to both parties to have a consistent schedule that shipper and carrier alike can count on.

Make Decisions Based on Data

The technology available to the supply chain has grown up so much over the past few years that we’re able to make inductive leaps that we’ve never been able to do before. With the right technology, we can collect a seemingly endless number of data points, aggregate them and turn them into something comprehensible. From there we can take that information and use it to make informed decisions as well as highlighting opportunities for efficiencies.

Even on the most basic level, for example, this technology gives shippers the ability to track their freight in real time and proactively make decisions that could avoid delays, rather than reacting when it already happened.

Conversely, this data is also a great way to improve the communication between shippers and carriers.

Weekly communication with carriers helps to foster positive growth in relations as well as provides the ideal opportunity to discuss operational problems and pain points. Yes, the transportation budget matters, but that pales in comparison to the difference between getting exceptional service and poor service.

Why Shippers Should Consider Working with a 3PL

Third-party logistics providers (3PLs) can be instrumental in navigating this pro-trucker market. As a shipper, working with a 3PL can give you access to carriers that are not only rated and vetted but have a good working relationship with your 3PL partner. Consider it a “leg up” on building a good relationship. Additionally, a good 3PL knows what their carriers are looking for in terms of preferred or “shippers of choice.” Because of that and the changing market conditions, 3PLs are becoming more heavily relied upon to help get the job done.

“It’s more than just the growth of demand that is making 3PLs a tempting partner for shippers. With the influx of big data, analytics, blockchain technologies, and so many more innovations, attempting to keep pace can be difficult. As demand grows and capacity tightens, shippers and carriers alike need to be smarter about how they operate if they want to stay competitive in today’s marketplace.

As the industry continues to change, it’s likely that we’ll only see 3PLs continue to grow in popularity.”

Working with a partner that’s dedicated to shaping up your supply chain takes much of the guesswork out of having to do it yourself. We at BlueGrace specialize in doing just that, make your logistics work for you in the leanest and most efficient way possible.

At BlueGrace, we take your current freight data and get an inside look at what your team may be missing. Our carrier procurement strategists will help you meet tight deadlines, optimize your freight expense, and ultimately, find peace of mind. Fill out the form below to find out more about how partnering with BlueGrace can create more visibility and opportunities to simplify, overall helping you find a better way to do business.

6 Reasons Why We Must Appreciate Truck Drivers All Year

Every year, from September 9th to 15th, we celebrate Truck Driver Appreciation week to thank the 3 million plus professional truck drivers in the country for their tireless service to the nation and all of its people.

While as an industry we have earmarked a specific week in the year to acknowledge the great work these professionals do for us, appreciation for their work should not be limited to seven days in a year. It should be a part of how we interact with them day in and day out all year round.

Six Reasons to Thank and Appreciate Truck Drivers Every Day of Every Year

#1. They drive the economy – Road transportation makes it possible for us to reach our end customers with ease and on time. Our truck drivers deliver the goods and commodities that we or our business require on a day to day basis to function with efficiency.

#2. Truckers facilitate other modes of transportation – Over the road transportation provides the link to sea, air, and rail transport. Our truck drivers deliver our goods to the terminals where they can be loaded on ships, cargo planes, or trains for further transportation. Road transportation managed by our truckers is what makes international trade and global movement of goods possible.

#3. Truck drivers keep our roads safe – By following all rules and regulations set for safe driving irrespective of how long they’ve been on the road, truck drivers ensure that the roads are safe for the other drivers and pedestrians. They are the monitors and the guides on the road.

#4. They’re always at work – Torrential rains, rough storms, heavy snowfall, or hot summer days, nothing can stop truck drivers from getting on the road and working. They’re working even when the roads are closed due to rough weather and all of us are sitting beside our fireside enjoying a day off from work with a hot cup of coffee or chocolate.

#5. They provide the calm in the calamity – When entire cities get washed away in storms or collapse due to earthquakes, truck drivers are the first to offer their services to go to the affected areas with food, clothing, medical aid, and other support. If required, they also help evacuate the people to safety, even if it means putting their own life at risk.

#6.  They stay away from their families for many days – Truck driving requires drivers to be on the road for days, sometimes even weeks at a time. To ensure that our lives and businesses continue to function without any hassles, the drivers often miss out on special occasions of their loved ones – wedding anniversaries, children’s birthdays, holidays, and other functions where their families may need their support or presence. For this devotion to their jobs, we must thank not only the truck drivers but also their families who support them in fulfilling their duties efficiently and effectively!

Take Time to Thank The Trucker Community!

As a part of the freight and logistics industry, we at BlueGrace Logistics would like to thank the truck driver community for the work they do to keep our business operating seamlessly and efficiently and for keeping our customers happy with every trip they make! Here’s a big THANK YOU to the drivers who keep our lives moving!