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2021

Outlook for LTL in 2021: A Pressurized Sector

The height of the COVID-19 pandemic forced many businesses to close their doors, in some cases for good. In March and April, during the early days of the “shelter in place” order and red phase, the less-than-truckload (LTL) sector saw a considerable drop in volume, as much as 20 percent.

Within a few months, freight volumes rebounded quickly, leaving carriers struggling to move freight.

Trucking firms, in an effort to keep their own doors open, issued extensive layoffs to compensate for the loss of business. However, within a few months, freight volumes rebounded quickly, leaving carriers struggling to move freight. So much so that some companies had to turn away new business in favor of trying to hire new drivers.  

“All the carriers I talk to are looking for another 100 to 500 drivers,” Satish Jindel, president of transportation research firm SJ Consulting Group, said in an interview with the JOC. “The trucking industry is short 2,000 or more drivers just on the LTL side. That tells you demand is robust. This is a great time for the whole industry and LTL carriers should be operating better in this environment.” 

It is indeed a profitable time for LTL carriers, especially as the demand for e-commerce continues to swell. XPO Logistics, the third-largest stand-alone LTL carrier in the United States, had to lower its adjusted LTL operating ratio to 79.7 percent in Q3, while Old Dominion Freight Line, the second-largest LTL carrier company, lowered their’s down to 74.5. This means that these carriers saw operating profit margins upwards of 25 percent, while most publicly owned LTL carriers are working with operating margins below 10 percent.  

“If XPO and ODFL can do this, there’s no reason others should not be able to,” Jindel says. “The LTL industry should be printing money right now; demand is exceeding capacity.” 

As with other modes of freight transportation, LTL contract rates will continue to climb, but not at the same rate as truckload pricing. LTL shippers and carriers should be expecting increases to remain in the mid to high single digits, whereas FTL freight is seeing double digits. As LTL volumes continue to rise, freight pricing will continue to stay steady throughout the year.  

Jindel said LTL operators “need to get their finances in order so they can reinvest in what’s going to be needed” in 2021. This means hiring more drivers, ordering new equipment, and investing in new technology.  

Beware The Bottlenecks

As it stands, capacity is tight, regardless of what mode a shipper decides to use, be it LTL, FTL, drayage or intermodal rail. Shippers are struggling to find the right fit for their freight needs, even more, to make sure the customer receives that freight on time.  

While the increase in demand makes for lucrative contracts, an overabundance of capacity is just as bad as too little if there isn’t enough equipment to move it.

While the increase in demand makes for lucrative contracts, an overabundance of capacity is just as bad as too little if there isn’t enough equipment to move it. This is being seen it two distinct problems. The first being the pervasive driver shortage in the United States. There simply aren’t enough drivers to fill the number of open seats behind the wheel, which leaves carrier companies competing over the same limited resource.  

The second issue is the amount of time it takes for a trailer to be unloaded. With the massive influx in demand, most big-box retailers are getting more trailers in faster than they can be unloaded, which is problematic. As most LTL carriers have a limited amount of equipment, every trailer that is tied up, waiting to be unloaded, shrinks the total amount of available capacity. 

Shippers Need To Start Planning  

Despite the vaccine rollout, there is no telling how much longer we will continue to experience COVID-19 restrictions. This means that pressure on LTL prices will continue, which could affect shipping budgets.

Unfortunately, due to how turbulent and unprecedented 2020 was, data from years prior is of limited help, shippers will basically have to figure out their shipping budget on the fly this year as we continue to navigate uncharted territory.

As e-commerce demand continues to grow, it is likely that many shippers will continue to see delays in their deliveries, which could be problematic if operating under tighter deadlines or restrictions such as OTIF policies.

In addition to higher prices, shippers will also have to factor in delays, as many carriers are struggling to keep up with the workload. As e-commerce demand continues to grow, it is likely that many shippers will continue to see delays in their deliveries, which could be problematic if operating under tighter deadlines or restrictions such as OTIF policies.

While capacity will remain a challenge, shippers do have some options available to them. One of the best methods is to work with a third-party logistics (3PL) provider. As a leader in LTL, BlueGrace can help you to find the capacity you need when you need it. Contact one of our experts today to get a quote on your next shipment.

How Technology Can Enhance Your Supply Chain In Four Ways

Supply chain disruptions are just a part of doing business. Seasonal events such as holiday shopping, black swan weather events, geopolitical tensions, and, in the case of 2020, a global pandemic. Anyone of these disruptions can cause a slow down in your supply chain and any combination of them can bring it to a screeching halt. Especially when that disruption has the ability to affect the entire world.

Nearly 75% of U.S. companies reported supply chain disruptions due to coronavirus-related issues.

According to a March survey conducted by the Institute for Supply Chain Management, nearly 75% of U.S. companies reported supply chain disruptions due to coronavirus-related issues. Before COVID-19 broke loose, most industries haven’t really felt the need to test their supply chain resiliency, or at least not to the extent that it is being tested now. Today, supply chain resiliency has taken on a new meaning and now includes aspects such as geographical diversification, visibility, and surplus capacity. These new considerations extend from raw materials to finished goods. 

What organizations needed from the outset of the pandemic, and will continue to need for the foreseeable future, is a reliable means of predicting COVID-19 cases as well as their current supply levels, product burn rates, and possible obstacles to sourcing materials.

As most companies haven’t found a reliable means to practice divination we’ve found that, with the right technology and data, this is possible.

As most companies haven’t found a reliable means to practice divination we’ve found that, with the right technology and data, this is possible. Here are four ways technology can help your organization build a stronger, more proactive supply chain. 

1.   Drive Comprehensive Supply Chain Visibility

Growth in global trade over recent decades has given rise to ever-increasing levels of complexity in supply chains. Few organizations likely evaluate the total network of manufacturers, distributors, and other logistics professionals who are all accountable for ensuring that the journey from raw material to delivered finished goods runs smoothly.

Yet 68% of product disruptions are a result of poor demand signaling. Global pandemic notwithstanding, the overall health and success of a supply chain rely on the ability to access accurate data with transparency into the whole of the supply chain. 

The health care supply chain is a perfect example. Early 2020 saw the initial outbreak of the Coronavirus and a drastic spike in demand. This was coupled with export bans from countries that supply more than 80 percent of the raw materials that are used to create personal protective equipment which created widespread shortages. In many hotspots around the world, supplies went from two-week worth of PPE supplies in February to only a few days’ worth by March.

Real-time data on the total supply chain enables organizations to accurately identify the intersection of demand and supply

Real-time data on the total supply chain enables organizations to accurately identify the intersection of demand and supply, secure product more effectively and sustainably, and better ascertain the potential risks with suppliers. Using a trusted supply-chain analytics platform delivers the reliable and precise data needed for organizations to identify areas of product vulnerability and introduce safeguards, whether it be a small disruption or something on the scale we’re seeing with COVID.

2.   Properly Managing a Complex Supplier Network

Within any multifaceted organization lies the beating heart of a complex supply network which consists of thousands of vendors working across multiple sites and regions that provide supplies and supporting operations. For example, an integrated health care system master vendor list can include upward of 6,000 distinct organizations, suppliers, vendors, and manufacturers.

Given the complexity, it is understandable that many organizations lack the ability to manage thousands of suppliers and their associated contacts

Given the complexity, it is understandable that many organizations lack the ability to manage thousands of suppliers and their associated contacts, proactively track services performed, and manage timely invoicing and payments.

To better manage the sheer multitude of vendors and reduce the overall risk of shortages and disruptions, organizations need a holistic strategy that typically includes the enlistment of a 3PL partner. Third-party logistics service providers can offer a procurement platform that leverages real-time data to more accurately manage vendor contracts, provide service verifications, automate invoicing and payments, manage overall supply chain costs, and improve the efficiency of the supply chain as a whole.

3.   Pinpoint and Engage Diverse Supply Chain Partners

Supplier diversity is a facet of the supply chain that has often taken a back seat to overall operations. However, as many organizations have had to learn the hard way, diversification is crucial to mitigating disruption.

While large companies are great for churning out products at a steady rate, small community businesses can help to fill in the gaps of your supply chain

While large companies are great for churning out products at a steady rate, small community businesses can help to fill in the gaps of your supply chain. Due to their size and agility, these companies can turn out projects with quick deadlines, as well as provide value-added services and products on a regular basis. For the healthcare industry, supplier diversity is essential, as it improves inclusiveness and equity, builds trust between patients and providers, and improves health outcomes for patients.

3PLs can help to solve this problem by linking you to a network of dedicated and reliable service providers, such as carriers

The challenge, however, is finding and vetting quality service providers, which is often difficult for larger companies, regardless of industry. 3PLs can help to solve this problem by linking you to a network of dedicated and reliable service providers, such as carriers, from their pool of trusted professionals, which allows your company to build a stronger supply network while reducing operations spending.

4.   Using Technology to Create a Disaster Preparedness Plan

The pandemic has caused a surge in demand across a wide variety of industries, as consumers have increased web orders across all e-commerce shopping platforms, a trend that will only continue to grow as we approach the holiday season and continue to see a resurgence in the spread of COVID-19 around the world. However, demand surges aren’t just limited to the pandemic, but can be triggered by black swan weather events such as hurricanes and winter weather.

These surges cause a significant jump in spot rates, which can throw your transportation budget completely out of balance.

These surges cause a significant jump in spot rates, which can throw your transportation budget completely out of balance. Not only do these spot rate jumps take months to return to pre-disaster levels, but the overall capacity shortage created by the demand hike can disrupt and delay the flow of your supply chain.

The technology systems that come with the right 3PL partner can not only help you improve your disaster response, but also help you find capacity when you need it most.

Strengthening Your Supply Chain with BlueGrace

With a technology-enabled supply chain, organizations can better allocate critical products and supplies while saving money, time, and―in some cases―lives.

Since 2009, our passion for logistics has helped shippers connect with carriers and keep our customers’ supply chains moving. We are dedicated to developing cutting edge, best in class technology that helps to drive savings, visibility, and efficiency into your operations. Contact us today to learn more about how BlueGrace can help your business not only survive these trying times, but thrive.

Preparing for 2020’s “Shipageddon”

2020 has been different from the norm in just about every single way imaginable, so it should come as no surprise that freight is going off the rails. This year we’re seeing big box retailers like Target and Walmart opening their Black Friday deals decidedly earlier than usual. Amazon, of course, has been leading the way in e-commerce sales for the better part of the year as quarantine and lock down restrictions forced many shoppers to go online, rather than in-store.

As we approach the holiday season, it is expected for cargo freight demand to rise to accommodate holiday shoppers.

As we approach the holiday season, it is expected for cargo freight demand to rise to accommodate holiday shoppers. This year, however, we’re also seeing a historic rise in import volumes measured in TEU (twenty foot equivalent unit) especially on lanes from Asia to the Pacific Coast. Containers and container spaces on ships are sold out and there is now a shortage of available containers in Asia for goods coming to the US. This leads to higher rates, longer lead times, congestion at the ports and higher rates for trucking and rail out of major port markets, especially Southern CA.

“To give you a sense of the demand right now, we are turning away  — each week  — more cargo than we are carrying,” revealed Matson CEO Matt Cox, referring to the scramble for slots on his company’s two China-U.S. services.

Holiday Cargo is Still Moving

When you have a massive amount of freight coming in by sea, it then has to be transferred over to land based carriers. Higher port congestion will create delays, bottlenecks, and an overall lag in the supply chain process. Again, this isn’t anything new for the holiday season. However, more holiday cargo is still being shipped and container and ocean freight space is still being oversold or cancelled. This situation could lead to the perfect storm scenario being dubbed “Shipageddon” in which freight doesn’t make it across the Pacific on time. Cox didn’t say anything to assuage such fears.


“What typically happens is that sort of by the end of October, most of what is going to make its way into the holiday-season shopping cycle will have arrived. That’s not what we’re seeing,” he warned.

“We’re seeing significant congestion in Asia. Although I’m not talking about Matson, we’re seeing cargo that wants to get on a ship that’s being rolled [pushed back to a subsequent sailing]. And we’re seeing the other international ocean carriers put in additional extra loaders [ships not in the normal service rotation]. This is not a typical season. There’s such demand for cargo. Many of our customers can’t keep up with the demand and cargo is back-ordered. For all of those reasons, we’re expecting to see the season extended. To when is the big question.”

Land Freight is About to be Buried

As we mentioned early, what arrives by sea must be shipped by land, be it to a retailer or a distribution center. With this massive uptick in ocean freight, we’re going to see a massive surge in truck freight for both the full truckload (FTL) and the less-than-truckload (LTL) sectors.

In addition to ocean freight space being well overbooked, there are other drivers for this potential shipping doomsday scenario.

Inventory Restocking Freight: While the holidays mean more toys, seasonal, and giftable merchandise, there are still the standard everyday items that stores need to carry for consumers. As we get closer to the holidays, retailers are hitting stockouts and empty shelves faster than ever. To complicate matters, investment bank Evercore ISI released a survey finding that shows 90 percent of respondents said their inventory levels were either “too low” or “a little too low” which suggests that the capacity shortage will continue, if not worsen, for sometime.

Higher than Average Holiday Spending: This year will also mark a potential rise in holiday spending that could range anywhere from a 1.9 percent increase in consumer spending to a 3.5 percent increase, pending the release of an effective pandemic relief bill and the release of a successful COVID-19 vaccine, according to RetailDive.

Holiday Shopping is starting Earlier and Lasting Longer: As we mentioned earlier, major retailers have begun their Black Friday deals well in advance of the typical holiday. Walmart has announced their “deals for days” holidays sales campaign, in which holiday sales will go on for the entire month of November. Target, and Amazon have also responded similarly, and it can be expected to continue right into the Holidays.

Last Mile Delivery is At Capacity: Major carriers such as UPS, FedEx, and the USPS, have had massive seasonal hiring events to try and bring in enough personnel to accommodate the influx in demand. Even with the staggering amount of seasonal workers to process, pack, and ship incoming packages, these carriers are warning consumers to shop now and ship earlier if they want to have their items arrive before the holidays. 

What Does this Mean for Shippers?

For shippers based in the United States, it’s about to be a bumpy ride. Capacity rates are going to be at a premium and even then, might not be available. To make matters worse, there is no way of telling just how long this is going to last, or how much worse it will get. It is important that shippers begin preparing immediately for what will be one of the busiest holiday seasons in memory.

Fortunately, you don’t have to do it alone. We here at BlueGrace are also making preparations for the holiday season and are ready to help you connect with carriers to ensure your freight gets to where it needs to be. Find out more about what BlueGrace can do for you and your supply chain today!

Will Q4 of 2020 Change the Way We Look at Bid Season?

If it were a normal year, the fourth quarter would bring a steady increase in trucking rates. However, 2020 has been anything but normal, so what does that mean for Q4?

Given that everything this year has been so drastically different from what we would expect, 2020 has been guided at best by short term predictions. It was predicted that Q2 would have lower rates due to lockdown, and while they were low, they still exceeded predictions. During Q3 we saw a surge in trucking rates, likely triggered by the e-commerce boom, and it’s expected to continue throughout the year. All signs are pointing to a prolonged trucking rally, despite the pandemic and political uncertainty in the U.S.

Ultimately, we’re in for something completely different for the fourth quarter than we’ve ever seen before.

Ultimately, we’re in for something completely different for the fourth quarter than we’ve ever seen before. All historical data is essentially being tossed out the window as 2020 has been unprecedented in so many ways. With bid season fast approaching for shippers, understanding what Q4 has in store will have a tremendous impact on how you go about your bidding process for 2021. 

High Q3 Rates Will Lead to Even Higher Rates in Q4

The pandemic has caused a shift in consumer spending due to social distancing measures and the lockdown period across the United States which has caused a spike in trucking demand. Despite the economic strains and widespread job loss that was experienced by many consumers, retail sales haven’t weakened. Instead of eliminating non essential spending, consumers have shifted their purchasing habits away from services and over to material goods, especially through e-commerce platforms.  

This means that retailers have been seeing peak volumes well in advance of the holiday spending season, causing them to struggle to keep stocks replenished. The demand has been reducing inventory levels, while sales remain strong (and continue to grow) leaving no buffer period before sales really start to climb in November and December as consumers begin their holiday shopping.

These two factors combined can result in elevated truckload spot rates and capacity shortages through the end of 2020 and potentially continue well into 2021.

With reduced inventory, a rise in demand for consumer products such as retail and grocery, and the continued recovery of industrial production will continue to push growth in truckload demand. However, challenges in the U.S. with the dwindling pool of truck drivers will continue to result in capacity shortages throughout several industries. These two factors combined can result in elevated truckload spot rates and capacity shortages through the end of 2020 and potentially continue well into 2021.

To add to the logistic nightmare, consumers now have an inherent expectation for fast shipping from e-commerce sites as well as a wider availability of pickup options which means that retailers are pressured to offer competitive shipping times or else lose out on sales to companies like Amazon.

Even with the current unemployment rate, the housing market is growing and consumer spending remains high.

The United States continues a strong economic climate despite, or perhaps in spite of, the uncertainties 2020 has given us; from social unrest due to the presidential election, to the ongoing struggle with COVID-19. The stock market is high and there is a growing optimism for an economic upswing ahead. Even with the current unemployment rate, the housing market is growing and consumer spending remains high. However, the economy could still be vulnerable, especially if the stock market is responding primarily to low interest rates and has an underlying weakness to its overall stability.

What can shippers do to manage current market volatility?

If we’ve learned anything from 2020 is that historical data is all but useless, as everything is different from the years we’ve seen prior. With bidding season on the horizon for 2021, it’s important to make sure that your organization has a clear direction on how to manage its bids to avoid redlining your freight budget.

An important place to start for your business in 2021 is with your routing guide procedure. Take another look at this document, make sure it’s up to date. Make sure you adjust for current rates and that it contains all your current requirements. It might be necessary to rebid for the short-term when the truck capacity is tight. Perform detailed research on market conditions and decide how long this customized “mini-bid contract” will last. As always, utilize freight forecasting and reporting to help manage your spot bids and awards.

How BlueGrace Can Help You Get the Most Out of Your Bid Season

In this year, more than ever, we need to think outside the box. In a constrained and uncertain market, this creates challenges for shippers. Last year, when demand was low and supply was outpacing demand, shippers had easy RFP cycles with carriers and brokers undercutting each other for rates. Programs like our Low Volume Aggregation program are attractive in the current market and can help shippers make sustainable bids for the upcoming year that will help them thrive during the uncertainties ahead.

Read more about our LVAP program here, or contact us using the for below to see how we can help your company succeed.

Digitalization Is Ushering Visibility Into Supply Chains

The North American trucking industry is extremely fragmented, as over 90 percent of all fleets own six trucks or fewer. This fragmentation, aside from inhibiting technology incursion, has impeded visibility and transparency in freight movement.

The opacity in operations impacts stakeholders across the trucking value chain. Oftentimes, this lack of visibility or transparency within the supply chain is due to outmoded and dated systems of communication.

The opacity in operations impacts stakeholders across the trucking value chain. Oftentimes, this lack of visibility or transparency within the supply chain is due to outmoded and dated systems of communication. Not only do these systems impede efficiency, but they also result in a number of missed opportunities for shippers, brokers, and carriers alike.

The adoption of digitalization within the trucking industry has spiked in recent years. A lot of it has to do with the rise of e-commerce and its associated ‘Amazon effect,’ which has created the need for expedited supply chains, especially the last-mile. This necessitated that trucking operations shed off inefficiencies especially with respect to visibility, which in turn led to a rise in innovations and the digitalization of the industry.

The Data Differentiator to Visibility

Stakeholders within the freight industry, be it fleets or traditional brokerages, suffer from siloed operations that do not interact with other functions within the same organization. This leads to data streams being trapped within workflows, thereby reducing operational efficiency and visibility.

Companies should phase out paper documentation and adopt digitalization in order to usher in visibility, and reduce complexities in gathering and processing documents. Aside from increasing efficiencies, this will also reduce material consumption, helping companies reach their sustainability goals.

With data streams being streamlined, stakeholders can leverage them via data analytics to gain insights into operations.

With data streams being streamlined, stakeholders can leverage them via data analytics to gain insights into operations. For instance, data analytics helps brokerages prime their operations to be more proactive to market volatility as opposed to only remaining reactive to change. This is particularly crucial in the age of e-commerce, where logistics businesses are expected to be malleable to continually evolving consumer expectations. To help meet expectations, leading companies are (or should be) taking advantage of linking their existing ERP systems to a TMS system.

For fleets, digitalization enables them to have visibility over driver behavior and freight movement. Aside from letting fleets provide an accurate estimated time of arrival (ETA), better visibility allows them to come up with flexible delivery models and faster shipping options.

On-demand fulfillment is a significant differentiator in the last-mile delivery segment. For this, businesses must understand customer behavior and buying characteristics – possible only by analyzing previous orders and having cognizance of market demand.

The Efficiency Perspective of the Freight Hauling Equation

Digitalization enables businesses to create greater visibility and increase cumulative efficiency across supply chains. Automation of repetitive manual tasks at the back office helps channelize worker hours in more productive and value-added endeavors. End customers gain access to shipping information, including real-time freight location, which improves overall customer service levels. Data streams are now stored in the cloud, making it easier to recall and share information between stakeholders in the value chain.

With technology like 5G coming up within the industry, high latency issues via the LTE network transmission will also be solved. Latency is the time it takes for data to travel from the place of origin (like a truck cab) to the destination – which is the cloud. High latency is a problem for data analytics, as it results in insights that are not, in essence, real-time. Bad cellular signals, which are commonplace when trucks haul through the country, result in high latency.

With 5G potentially becoming mainstream in a few years, the latency value can be expected to reduce. Stakeholders would then be able to access more ‘real-time’ insights, helping to further improve efficiencies.

Digitalization has helped businesses to eliminate cumbersome manual processes that have been an industry’s staple.

Digitalization has helped businesses to eliminate cumbersome manual processes that have been an industry’s staple. Data levels the playing field for shippers and carriers, whatever be their size of operations. With visibility being ubiquitous across the industry, the overall market can learn to handle volatility better, especially in the context of economic recession or a black swan event like the COVID-19 pandemic.

Of course, adopting new technologies is a costly and time-consuming endeavor, which discourages many companies from adopting newer innovations. This is where digital freight management, specifically third-party logistics providers (3PLs), shine. Partnering with a 3PL allows companies to reap the benefits of these digitized systems without the heavy investment cost of overhauling legacy systems.

Finalizing Your 2021 Transportation Budget – The New Normal

Freight Budgeting for 2021 is going to be very different from the traditional budgeting done in previous years. The effects of the economic shutdowns stemming from the COVID-19 crisis have trickled down to Q4 and have managed to create unforeseen supply chain challenges for business operations across North America. Organizations have addressed and responded to the situation in various ways and the adaptations have been unique to each market and industry served.  With this same principle applied there cannot be one standard transportation budget methodology applied while planning for 2021 The ability to respond to these challenges will determine the future strategies required in 2021 to ensure recovery and possible profitable performance.

The essential goods movement surged in the past months, and different modes were preferred to move these goods.

Freight Budgeting then vs. now

The evident change in consumer behavior and the booming e-commerce marketplace has opened access to new consumer segments relying on faster doorstep deliveries for products that were earlier purchased the traditional way. The essential goods movement surged in the past months, and different modes were preferred to move these goods. The industry saw more parcel shipment related movements and trucking kept the economy afloat. The crisis brought many digitization initiatives to the forefront and accelerated technology innovations. The need for advanced analytics has been stressed time and again to enable businesses to respond better to disruption.

Budgeting for 2021 will need mapping existing resources with strategy and a shift from the traditional inputs and standard approaches.

Amidst all the industry changes and shifts, the crisis has brought in excellent opportunities to learn and implement new strategies for 2021. Budgeting for 2021 will need mapping existing resources with strategy and a shift from the traditional inputs and standard approaches. The need for more incredible speed and cost control spans across all industries, therefore making it a challenging task to achieve a perfect budget for 2021. The traditional approach to budgeting, whether bottom-up or top-down, can face roadblocks with repeated negotiations and may ignore syncing strategy with value creation and resource allocation. Therefore, the 2021 budgeting should be a strategic exercise that considers data insights to unlock value and bring flexibility in resource allocation to ensure desired resilience in the supply chains.

Predictive Analytics

Predictive Analytics regarding supply chains can help provide some actionable insights into the budgeting process. The data insights can help predict customer responses or purchase behavior based on 2020 to suggest better ways to respond to demand in the coming year. Questions like how has the crisis impacted other stakeholders across geographies and what are their implications in freight budgeting for 2021?

Streamlining the freight budget process

Streamlining the freight budget process to be more responsive in disruptive scenarios is essential. The procedure to achieve such streamlined and efficient budgeting may vary from business to business this year. What may work for one company may not drive results for the other.

Operational KPIs

Comparing the recent trends and linking operational KPIs with strategic plans are elemental to drive data regarding the actual impact the business has endured in times of this economic crisis. How has the economic crisis impacted liquidity risks and how the uncertainties in the market impact these operational KPIs must be understood to plan the recovery and the strategy governing the freight budget for 2021.

A careful assessment of all factors that brought about the level of disruption for businesses this year will determine the strategies for 2021. Some may have to focus on sustaining the business while others may focus on restructuring the business to match the demand.

Finalizing Your 2021 Freight Budget Webinar October 21

At BlueGrace, we are addressing the need for a more strategic approach to freight budgeting in 2021 through a webinar. Watch the recorded Webinar now to learn how to steer your budgeting exercises for 2021 to build a more robust and agile supply chain for your business. We will address the burning questions related to planning the freight budget this year and discuss how BlueGrace is helping navigate the uncertainties of post-pandemic normalcy.