The Logistics Of The Super Bowl

Not even COVID can stop what is according to Supply Chain 247  “the world’s most-watched single sporting event”. As Tampa, Florida prepares to host Super Bowl LV, a litany of logistics experts huddle to make sure wardrobes are the most consequential thing malfunctioning on February 7.

Creating A Super Bowl Experience 

Construction materials leading up to hosting a Super Bowl do need to be transported, but a much larger demand on shipping will be from the cultural traditions that football fans hold for the big game. It’s not Super Bowl Sunday without wings, our favorite drinks and every kind of chip dip imaginable!  

Over 1.25 Billion chicken wings, 28 million pounds of potato chips, 54 million avocados and 50 millions cases of beer will be consumed on what is known as the second biggest eating day of the year. 

With an abundance of demand, goods need to arrive on time to avoid shortages and missed opportunity for profits in retail. 

So whether fans make purchases in or near Stadiums, prior to a gathering at home, or out at their favorite sports bar; consumers are ready to spend for the experience. Food, alcohol, apparel, and decorations will all need to be stocked by retailers. With an abundance of demand, goods need to arrive on time to avoid shortages and missed opportunity for profits in retail. 

Meeting Inventory Demands Through Capacity 

The most important and often the most challenging problem in fulfillment is last-mile delivery. If disaster is going to strike with a carrier, the largest impact this can have is during the transfer from distribution center to storefront. Distribution centers cannot order perishable items too far in advance.  However, if an inbound load is late to the distribution center, stores have the option to order other items from their distribution inventory while still receiving their in demand non-perishables. With interruptions in last-mile delivery, consumables may not reach the shelves in time for the big game surge in purchasing. Retailers do not like losing profits and market share.  

Carriers want to focus on accurate projections in order to make best-fit decisions between FTL and LTL. FTL options are enticing due to their lower spot rates, however LTLs can have a significant cost-benefit advantage when expediting a load is the priority. Unfortunately, carriers can lose the gamble with FTL.  When shippers are in a crunch for time and need to get a load sent out, even if it’s a partial, they may end up paying FTL rates instead of LTL rates, which tend to be decidedly cheaper for the volume of freight being shipped. 

Luckily, resources like visibility and real-time notifications mean that making choices for a reliable supply chain don’t have to feel like betting the farm.

Since retailers are not likely to forget the bad taste in their mouths left by coming up short during a high sales annual event, it may benefit freighters to make the safe wager on last-mile delivery by booking LTL. Luckily, resources like visibility and real-time notifications mean that making choices for a reliable supply chain don’t have to feel like betting the farm. With transparency through technology from BlueGrace, you can take a move out of the NFL’s own Frank Supovitz’s handbook and be prepared for anything this Super Bowl Sunday. 

Do you have questions about your LTL or FTL? Are you curious if you might need help optimizing either for them for your “big game”? Contact our logistics experts at BlueGrace Logistics today and let’s talk more.