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transportation management

The Search for a Supply Chain Solution

Supply chain management has always been an essential part of running a successful business, but now the rules of the game are changing. In order to stay ahead of these changes, the supply chain needs to become better organized, more flexible, and able to adapt to whatever is coming down the road.  

Compliance, for example, is becoming a big concern. Trucking companies are being hit with some heavy rules and regulations, such as the ELD and the HoS mandates, which can limit the efficiency of freight transportation. The EPA has passed new regulations regarding carbon emissions which also need to be contended with. Not the least of which is the change in demand and expectations of the customer. Everything is moving at a much more accelerated pace. Consumers aren’t content to wait for two weeks when they think they should have it in two days.  

Handing these changes appropriate does more than making your company more efficient. It raises your overall customer service experience which is vital to the day and age of social media where bad publicity and losing a customer to the competitor is just a tweet away. Legacy systems and the old-school methodology has gotten us this far, and it’s not going to cut it in today’s market. So what needs to change? 

Supply Chains: Out with the Old and In With the New 

Looking back at those legacy systems, they’ve worked for a considerable amount of time, so what’s wrong with them now? Ultimately, they’re clunky and slow to move. Companies need the ability to change and adopt new strategies quickly, be it a capacity shortage or a bottleneck in materials. Legacy systems support a certain rigidity which, back then, was fine. A customer could wait a little longer for a part, piece, or item to be delivered. Now trying to stick to the old ways runs the risk of hindering growth, costing more in both business and expenses, and could put the future of the company itself in jeopardy.  

Unfortunately, many of these changes in demand for the supply chain are coming at a time where IT budgets are being cut back. The end result is that more money is being spent on maintenance and upkeep rather than overhauling and innovating these systems. It’s not much better for new companies, however. Having to shell out a considerable investment in new systems and technology might prove too dear a price for a company that doesn’t necessarily have the extra capital to throw around.

Realistically, what we need is a new approach to this problem

Realistically, what we need is a new approach to this problem. A new way to push both innovation and differentiation from the competition. A scalable solution that can be moved up incrementally as a company is able to both adapt and afford these changes based on needs and goals for the supply chain.

Modern Flexibility 

Another interesting thing to note is that these changes are coming at a much faster pace than we’ve ever seen before, and they aren’t showing any signs of letting up or slowing down.  

Customer and consumer expectations are growing and changing. They want newer, better, and faster, and they want it delivered quickly in a way and location that is convenient for them. Couple that with the fact that new startups and companies are hitting the field daily, and it’s easy to see how a rigid supply chain could spell out disaster.  

Aside from looking to incorporate other systems or looking to a 3PL to help troubleshoot your supply chain, the only other alternative is to get left behind.  

Speaking of newer companies, many of them are already hip to these marketplace changes. They’re starting the game with a scalable and more agile approach to their supply chain which makes them a heavier competitor, despite being new to the game. While changing over to the latest versions of system software and new functionalities can help keep pace with the competition, it’s both, time consuming and expensive. Aside from looking to incorporate other systems or looking to a 3PL to help troubleshoot your supply chain, the only other alternative is to get left behind.  

Visibility is a Must 

Today’s supply chain is a global construction in the majority of cases. Crossing over borders and oceans creates a new level of difficulty that we haven’t seen in the past. Customs and regulations, translations and transportation issues, demurrages and delays, any and all of these events can severely slow the supply chain down and rack up some hefty surcharges in the process. This is one reason why enhanced visibility is an absolute must. It not only helps a company to mitigate risk but helps to reduce costs while raising profitability.  

Visibility, however, remains one of the more difficult bridges to cross for many companies.

Visibility, however, remains one of the more difficult bridges to cross for many companies. Much of a companies information is buried and when systems aren’t communicating, it makes true visibility seem all but impossible without dedicating substantial resources to it. However, a lack of real-time visibility means that almost every area of your business could be affected. Production costs, product design, customer satisfaction and compliance all rely on a high level of visibility. 

Finding the Right Solution 

Having the right solution in place for your supply chain can take many different forms, but all of them share a few key characteristics.  

Agility: The ability to change to new demands quickly is vital. The right solution should be able to highlight and identify weak spots within your organization and supply chain and help you to create a plan to fix it.  

Ease of Use: The solution shouldn’t create more problems. Having a system that is excessively complex or difficult can bog down the process while leaving existing issues unfixed. The right solution should cut the processing time down and help you get your freight on the road faster.  

Completeness and Connectivity: When it comes to shipping freight, your solution should be able to handle it all. Whether you need to manage full truckloads, LTLs, or a complete, multimodal transportation and logistics program.  

Cost and Efficiency: Simply put, having a solution in place is one thing, but being able to afford it is something else entirely. Finding the right solution should help to save your company money, not put it in the red.  

Fast, Flexible and Safe Deployment: A total systems overhaul can create some serious issues. Deploying a solution needs to be able to be performed quickly and seamless so as not to disrupt the day-to-day operations that keep your company running.  

How BlueGrace Can Help 

Of course, there are numerous systems and solutions out there that all promise to meet your needs when it comes to improving your supply chain. But not all of those solutions are created equal, and no one fits all. Also bear in mind, when the system fails or is unable to handle your requirements efficiently and professionally, your operations can come to a screeching halt.  

BlueGrace offers a different approach to upgrading the supply chain that is both innovative as well as easy to integrate. When you’re looking to keep freight moving, BlueGrace is there to help. With our TLC approach, we take the time to make sure that your supply chain is flowing smoothly and you’re turning your operation into the best, most efficient business it can be. To speak to one of our experts and find out more about BlueGrace and how we can help provide you with the solution to your supply chain needs, fill out the form below or contact us at 800.MYSHIPPING

Produce Season and How It Affects Capacity

 

Food items are something that will always be in demand. Consumers expect fresh produce and other food products year around. As such, FTR Transportation Intelligence expects 154.5 million truckloads of food and kindred products this year, up 5% from 2017. Moreover, truckloads of food are expected to rise by an additional 8% to 166.9 million by 2020. This, in turn, results in an increased demand for refrigerated and dry vans. 

However, regulatory requirements including the recent Food Safety Modernization Act, which includes new rules covering shippers, receivers, loaders and carriers that transport food is having an impact on the industry. One part of the act on food transportation spells out requirements on issues, including adequate temperature controls for trucks, food contamination prevention, and vehicle cleanliness.  

Additionally, individual food, beverage, and perishable suppliers are feeling the heat from rising transportation prices.

Additionally, individual food, beverage, and perishable suppliers are feeling the heat from rising transportation prices. During their most recent earnings calls, Kellogg Co. noted that freight is causing its most “acute” cost pressures, while General Mills Inc. issued a full-year profit warning due to increasing costs associated with the shortage of truck drivers. While Kellogg is looking towards its supply chain to achieve cost savings, other food companies such as Hormel Foods and Smithfield Foods, have started to build out their own private trucking fleets. 

Produce Season Is a Busy Time 

While holidays have a substantial effect on freight capacity, produce season can cause one of the biggest crunches of the year. This year, produce season is kicking off with a bang, which might cause some strain on both carriers and shippers. “US wholesalers and shippers stocking shelves with produce are grappling with steep truck rates up as high as 30 percent from last year — as prices out of California and Mexico surge with the produce season kicking into high gear after Memorial Day,” according to the Journal of Commerce 

 “Refrigerated truck rates have followed the same industry-wide trend: spot market prices are up about 20 percent to 30 percent on a year-over-year basis. Load-to-truck ratios are elevated because there aren’t enough trucks capable of handling the demand, which gives the truckers leverage to prioritize shippers paying a higher rate.” 

Truckers Feeling the Weight of The ELD 

The Electronic Logging Device (ELD) mandate, which was passed last December, is starting to put some extra pressure on carriers. The mandate has effectively lowered productivity while increasing the transit times, as carriers have to contend with the mandatory rest period. According to the Cass Freight Index, shipments have risen upwards of 12 percent over the last month, meaning more trucks are needed to handle the same freight volume. This, of course, needs to happen before a carrier can consider taking on new freight.  

Fortunately for the produce season, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has made certain allowances for agricultural carriers. So long as the carrier is operating within 150 air-miles of the loading site, be it a farm, silo, or processing facility, they won’t have to start the clock. Leaving the radius would cause to the clock to resume, but the added flexibility is essential for agricultural businesses to survive the produce season.  

Supply and Demand: A Double-Digit Rate Spike  

Even with the added flexibility softening the blow from the ELD, market conditions remain largely unchanged. The rise in capacity demand for the season is resulting in some hefty transportation fees. According to data from the USDA, national refrigerated spot rates were up 28 percent (25 percent not counting diesel costs) over the same week last year. These rates are being seen fairly consistently, ranging from 22 to 29 percent on the U.S. west coast. “At one point this year, I paid $12,000 for a truck. Last year for the same load and same route, it would’ve cost me $9,000 [33 percent hike],” said Peter Pelosi, director of transportation for A&J Produce Corp. 

Kurt Schuster of Texas’s Val Verde Vegetable Company told KRGV, “They tripled or even quadrupled. What would normally be a $2,000 ride turned into an $11,000 ride? One of the main drivers was actually in the big freeze that hit the U.S., but these freight rates aren’t helping at all.” 

Roadcheck Week Had Carriers Scrambling 

To further add to the complication, the month of June is when the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance conducts it’s Roadcheck Week. While it’s only a period of 72 hours, most carriers are scrambling to make sure their ducks are in a row. The focus for this year’s road check: Hours of Service Violations. “The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck takes place June 5-7, 2018. Over that 72-hour period, commercial motor vehicle inspectors in jurisdictions throughout North America conducted inspections of commercial motor vehicles and drivers.

Thirty-two percent of drivers who were placed out of service during last year’s three-day International Roadcheck were removed from our roadways due to violations related to hours-of-service regulation.

This year’s focus was on hours-of-service compliance,” says the CVSA brief. “The top reason drivers were placed out of service during 2017 International Roadcheck was for hours-of-service violations,” said CVSA President Capt. Christopher Turner of the Kansas Highway Patrol. “Thirty-two percent of drivers who were placed out of service during last year’s three-day International Roadcheck were removed from our roadways due to violations related to hours-of-service regulations. It’s definitely an area that we needed to call attention to this year,” the CVSA added.  

Work Smarter Not Harder  

If the capacity crunch and rate hike proves anything, it’s the fact that shippers and carriers alike are going to have to work smarter if they want to operate at peak efficiency. The ELD mandate is slowing road freight down considerably.  

A transportation management system can help make the most of a ripe transportation season while avoiding the pitfalls that come with higher transportation costs and reduced capacity.

This is one of the big reasons that shippers and carriers are looking to 3PLs to help bridge the gap. A transportation management system can help make the most of a ripe transportation season while avoiding the pitfalls that come with higher transportation costs and reduced capacity.  BlueGrace partners with an extensive list of carriers, providing you with the resources needed to ease the affects of the tight capacity crunch.  If you would like more information on how BlueGrace can help  simplify your supply chain and reduce transportation costs, fill out the form below to speak to one of our experts today! 

The Inner Workings of Overnight Shipping

E-commerce has radically changed the way we look at shipping. When Amazon first got off the ground back in 1997, waiting a week or two for a book was par for the course, and that was assuming that the item was being shipped domestically.

Now, waiting a week or more is almost inconceivable. The modern consumer expects rapid deliveries that border on the level of impossible back in the inception of e-commerce. Even now, the two-day delivery is breaking way for the next or even the same-day delivery.

Warehouses and order selection are being automated. Deliveries are being made by ride-sharing companies, drones, and delivery robots. Parcels are moving through the stream from start to finish at break-neck speeds, and all the while e-commerce continues to push the envelope for delivery times.

While this means that there has been considerable growth and evolution of the supply chain, there are certain aspects of the old school methodology which are still in play even now.

How Overnight Shipping Actually Works 

Package delivery is kind of like a race. When a customer places the order, the starting gun is fired and the clock starts ticking. But rather than a marathon or a cross-country run (even though most packages are, in fact, going cross country), it’s more like a relay race.  

As it stands, most major packaging companies use what’s known as the hub-and-spoke method for deliveries. A package gets dropped off at a drop point (Post office, FedEx or UPS locations, etc.) and is transported to the nearest cargo-shipping airport. From there, the package is flown to the nearest hub where it is unloaded, sorted, and reloaded back onto the next plane to continue its journey. Once the package reaches the target airport (sometimes requiring a third and final flight for truly rural locales) it’s loaded onto a truck and either sent to a sorting facility, or straight on to the last mile of the delivery.  

While it all seems fairly standard practice at this point, we have to consider that this hub-and-spoke method really only came about in the 1970’s when FedEx founder, Frederick W. Smith proved the efficiency behind the concept.  

Memphis: The Super Hub 

Interestingly enough, the biggest hub in the United States is Memphis, Tennessee. So much so that Memphis is home to the second busiest airport in the world, second only to Hong Kong. This is due largely to the fact that FedEx has set up shop for their super hub in Memphis. With 30,000 employees, the super hub is able to process and ship about 3 million packages a day with an average air traffic flow of 150 planes taxiing and departing nightly.  

Cargo departing Memphis can reach just about anybody in the United States in the optimal shortest amount of time — making it the perfect sorting site for overnight shipments.

So, why Memphis, with a population of 650,000? “Because it’s just a short jaunt from what’s called the mean center of the United States population (located in eastern Missouri). In other words, cargo departing Memphis can reach just about anybody in the United States in the optimal shortest amount of time — making it the perfect sorting site for overnight shipments.

For packages making the trip across the pond, Anchorage, Alaska is the chosen hub of departure for packages going to and from Japan, making it the fourth busiest freight hub in the world.  

What makes Overnight Shipping so Affordable? 

As the idiom goes, a plane in the sky is worth two on the tarmac. Simply put, airlines make money from planes that are in use, but that actually only works for passenger flights. To that end, commercial planes are in constant use.  

Domestic overnight cargo flights, on the other hand, don’t need to be in constant use. Why? Because carriers use much older planes.  

“Many cargo planes fly just one dedicated route every night, basically like a bus in the air. Sometimes they spend just a couple hours in the air each day, and the rest of it they sit around at one end of the spoke or the other. It sounds inefficient, but in fact, the economics of this work out for cargo couriers because they haven’t shelled out huge investment in the first place. They’ve bought retired commercial aircraft—basically a fleet of used cars,” says Quartz.   

The savings alone from repurposing retired aircraft is considerable. According to Avitas, an airline consulting firm, a brand new 767-300ER can run upwards of $200 million. The same model of the plane after 20 or so years of service? Around $9 million. That savings alone means that a cargo plane can be used as needed, waiting to be loaded with cargo to make the run back and forth, and causing considerable less wear and tear in the process versus a passenger plane that has to keep moving for the airline to recognize a return on investment.

Creating a Strong Foundation 

The transition of point-to-point delivery systems into the hub-and-spoke have brought e-commerce a considerable distance, but much in the same way that we don’t want to reinvent the wheel, there’s no sense in getting rid of the things that do work. As the future of the supply chain continues to evolve through this new industrial revolution, we will see more advancements. 3D printing taking the place of manufacturing for on-site building and delivery. Drones that can make drops to your own personal location, be it a park or a parking lot.  

 The demanding future of shipping will be built on the scaffolding created in the past.

The demanding future of shipping will be built on the scaffolding created in the past. As it continues to evolve, the elements that withstand the test of time will not only be evident, they will become foundational for your supply chain. BlueGrace’s freight specialists work with you every step of the way to understand your requirements and set up a solution that’s tailored to your needs. For more information on how we can help you prepare for the future and simplify your supply chain, contact us using the form below: 

The Supply Chain Manager of The Digital Age

 

The supply chain has long been held as the lifeline for any company’s operations. It is the flow of goods and materials necessary for the company to continue to function and operate at peak efficiency. Because of that, supply chain managers understandably need the most accurate information in real-time about what’s happening within the chain. Armed with up to date data, a manager can make decisions about how to proceed in the event of problems, delays, and overall operations.  

Legacy systems that have sustained the supply chain for the past several decades are no longer valid.

However, in the face of new and disruptive technologies, the legacy systems that have sustained the supply chain for the past several decades are no longer valid. They lack the ability to provide the necessary end-to-end visibility required for high speed, lean operations. But it’s not just the tech that’s getting outmoded. Soon the position of supply chain manager might be a thing of the past as well.

“New digital technologies that have the potential to take over supply chain management entirely are disrupting traditional ways of working. Within 5-10 years, the supply chain function may be obsolete, replaced by a smoothly running, self-regulating utility that optimally manages end-to-end workflows and requires very little human intervention,” according to the Harvard Business Review.

“With a digital foundation in place, companies can capture, analyze, integrate, easily access, and interpret high quality, real-time data — data that fuels process automation, predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, and robotics, the technologies that will soon take over supply chain management,” HBR adds.  

Making the Shift 

Some companies are already experimenting with different ways to make the shift into an automated supply chain. Robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) are already being used to digitize and automate the more labor heavy and repetitive tasks within the supply chain. While this applies to warehouse and distribution center mechanics, such as order picking and selecting, it also applies to front-of-the-house tasks such as purchasing, invoicing, accounts payable, and various facets of customer service.   

The use of predictive analytics is giving companies better insight into upcoming demand which is vital for shoring up in times of demand volatility, as well as making better use of in-house assets, and cutting costs for customer service functions without sacrificing quality.   

Intelligent Design Leads to Smarter Operations  

One of the big aspects of this technological shift is sensor data. The data collected can better monitor machine use and maintenance which can reduce downtime by providing real-time alerts on upcoming maintenance reducing the chances for machine breakdowns.   

Blockchain technology is also growing in both popularity and utilization as a means to radically optimize how different parties collaborate and communicate within supply chain networks. Instantaneous and complete data chains can provide users, end-to-end, with complete visibility of the entire supply chain process from initial components and raw materials to completed products slated for delivery.  

Transportation procurement should also be digitized in order to keep the pace.

Transportation Management Systems (TMS) will also be playing a role in the supply chain shift. Given the newfound agility of the digitized supply chain, it makes sense that transportation procurement should also be digitized in order to keep the pace. Many companies are looking more to 3PLs and intermediaries to find capacity and book freight, trusting in their systems to reduce the time and effort previously required to perform this task.  

As we mentioned before, robotics are seeing a heavier implantation rate for warehouse and fulfillment center operations. Rio Tinto, a global mining consortium, has been exploring automated metal mining operations for the past several years. This would make use of driverless trains, automated trucks, cameras, lasers, and tracking sensors, all of which would allow the supply chain to be managed remotely while improving safety and the need for personnel in remote locations.  

Less Personnel: More Control 

One of the concepts set forth by Rio Tinto and other companies who are taking the automated approach to supply chain management is the “digital control tower.” This is, in essence, a virtual decision center which is equipped to provide necessary end-to-end visibility in real time across the global supply chain. For smaller companies, these control towers have become the command center for operations. For those working in these control towers, it is their job to keep their thumb on the pulse of their supply chain, monitoring the influx of data 24/7 for any inventory shortages, bottlenecks, or literally anything else that could disrupt their supply chain operations.  

The control towers serve as the front line for a supply chain, allowing planners to quickly adapt, change, or reroute the supply chain to correct any of these potential issues before it becomes an actual problem. This works not only for retail companies but for industrial companies as well. “One manufacturer’s complex network moves more than a million parts and components per day. The control tower flags potential supply issues as they arise, calculates the effects of the problem, and either automatically corrects the issue using pre-determined actions or flags it for the escalation team,” says HBR.  “Similarly, a steel company built a customized scenario-planning tool into its control tower platform that increases supply chain responsiveness and resilience. The tool simulates how major, unexpected equipment breakdowns — so-called “big hits” — will affect the business and points to the best risk mitigation actions,” they added.  

Is This the End of the Supply Chain Manager? 

As more and more things turn towards automation, there is always the concern that human positions will be replaced and outmoded. This has, typically speaking, only affected the lower end of the spectrum, those positions that perform the menial and repetitive tasks. However, as the supply chain itself is becoming more and more automated, will we see a need for supply chain managers in the future or will they too be replaced by AI and computers?  

Rather than simply managing people to do the repetitive work, they’ll have to manage the data flows.

 Ultimately, the answer is no. Much like any position that could be replaced by a robot or a computer algorithm, there will always be a need for some human intervention. For supply chain professionals, this will mean focusing on different skill sets in the future. Rather than simply managing people to do the repetitive work, they’ll have to manage the data flows. Analyzing and interpreting the data to make the best possible decision when handling a potential issue. This skill will require learning how to make the most of digital tools, analyze and validate data sets, and make an effective forecast from the data provided.  

It will be the companies and the specialist who can adopt and adapt to the new technologies that will come out on top.

Companies will have to change their approach from the tried and true to the new order. Supply chain management, as we’ve known it from the past is on it’s way out. It will be the companies and the specialist who can adopt and adapt to the new technologies that will come out on top.  

As manufacturing and decision making become more automated, transportation will also be a vital area of focus for companies. Both the supply chain and transportation are in the process of evolving into something completely different from what we’ve seen in the past. Companies will have to adapt, and quickly, to these changes if they want to keep their supply chain flowing smoothly. While the digitization can help with that to some extent, there are some areas in which it will fall short.

A Vital Asset 

Third-party logistics providers will become vital in this disruptive era, helping companies navigate the shifts and changes within transportation logistics as they occur. BlueGrace not only provides clients with the bandwidth to create transparency, operate efficiently, and drive direct cost reductions, but our proprietary transportation management system, BlueShip, is free!  For more information on how we can help give you the visibility you need and adapt to the future, feel free to contact us using the form below: 

 

Bricks and Mortar: 5 Real Applications of AI To Improve Bottom Line

Many applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) for brick and mortar retail seem far off, or too futuristic. We picked 5 of the more accessible applications of AI that could help improve your bottom line this year.

1. User accounts

Brick and mortar stores have often felt disadvantaged when it comes to AI compared to e-commerce retailers. Stores simply do not have the same depth of customer behavior tracking data that Amazon does, for example. However, many AI applications for e-commerce could transfer to physical stores.

With store user accounts, retail brands better synchronize offline and online retail.

The mingling of brick and mortar with online shopping occurs in many ways – such as relying upon location-based services or the use of a universal cart that can be used whether you are shopping on a mobile, desktop or voice-powered device. Omnichannel commerce covers many forms of customer experience – the many touch points a customer has with a retailer. Brick and mortar retail can rely on online data when shoppers set up a user account at the store, or from using click and collect or delivery services. With store user accounts, retail brands better synchronize offline and online retail. This reduces the “separateness between these channels [that] poses a threat to operational efficiencies and adds friction to customers hoping to shop in a seamless and consistent fashion.”

2.Recurring billing

A shift towards recurring orders and subscription shopping services is taking place. Retailers can immediately think of ways to encourage clients to consider their habitual, recurring purchases (laundry soap for instance) and plan for them. In that way, habitual orders can be delivered “on repeat.”

Smaller companies might consider subscription programs to expand customer reach and deepen relationships.

Smaller companies might consider subscription programs to expand customer reach and deepen relationships. With subscriptions, member incentives increase visitors to physical locations (Special offers). An example of a “masterful combination of a subscription program and a sophisticated store network”, is Sephora. Cosmetics are especially suitable as sampling products. Those interested want to try out new products – plus they are small and easy to ship. “Sephora’s PLAY! program offers subscribers access to new products through home deliveries while also encouraging them to shop at their local stores to build up points they can redeem for exclusive prizes and experiences.”

3. Style assistants

AI Style assistants in stores are not too far off, as well as other forms of augmented reality, like voice-activated assistants. Expect changes in the store environment, such as is already happening at Zara. “At Zara’s new flagship store in London, shoppers can swipe garments along a floor-to-ceiling mirror to see a hologram-style image of what they’d look like as part of a full outfit. Robot arms get garments into shoppers’ hands at online-order collection points. iPad-wielding assistants also help customers in the store order their sizes online, so they can pick them up later.”

4. What’s Old is New Again

What is AI really anyway? Retail AI is simply mimicking the original experience of a country store (when an associate would help you, care about you, and talk with you) (personalization), with empathy (care for the customer) and manners.

The bulk of retail revenue continues to be derived from brick and mortar stores. The tactile nature of shoppers’ needs is one of the most important factors of this and why physical retail remains. AI can improve empathy, or sensitivity and understanding of a customers’ point of view – and needs – to scale. As observed by many, “It’s no longer about segmenting customers based on general characteristics such as gender or age. Knowing a consumer’s attitudes and sentiments towards things, favorite day of the week they like to shop, the associate they like to deal with, the price points that they buy at, etc., will help retailers better target their consumers and deliver a great experience.”

Using AI options can begin today, even in the way we remember the original needs of the customer.

5. Logistics & Inventory Management

AI addresses out of stock product head on. With AI solutions, a notification that an item is out of stock, running low or out of place in the store is sent out right away to an in-store associate. Currently, Home Depot’s website offers “a vast array of local store data, such as stock levels down to the number of SKUs carried in a store. If you need 10 items of a specific SKU, you want to know a store has that many before you go. It’s no good if we only have two,’” explains Dave Abbott, the retailer’s vice president of integrated media.

Also, data-driven insights on the logistics end, such as offered by BlueGrace, increase operational efficiency

Also, data-driven insights on the logistics end, such as offered by BlueGrace, increase operational efficiency. Using BlueGrace proprietary technology connects retailers with AI possibilities. After companies undergo a review with a BlueGrace specialist, they are presented with new opportunities for cost savings, such as opportunities to implement predictive analytic technology with certain partners that will factor in weather and inventory levels. This will help direct trucks to different stores as part of an overall supply chain improvement. BlueGrace’s enhanced shipment visibility and business intelligence pave the way for AI initiatives.

For more information on how BlueGrace can help you create visibility and operational efficiency, feel free to fill out the form below or contact us at 800-MY-SHIPPING.

What is Transportation Management Workflow and How Does It Work

Transportation Management Workflow may be defined as a supply chain workflow that connects and links the various parties involved along the chain from, for example, the seller’s warehouse to the buyer’s warehouse. A professional and effective logistics services provider needs to have an efficient transportation management workflow which follows a logical sequence and has the most effective operational procedures. 

One of the primary requirements would be to operate an effective TMS or Transportation Management System. 

One of the primary requirements would be to operate an effective TMS or Transportation Management System.  The TMS used should be capable of handling various aspects of transport management including needs assessment, effective analysis, integration and management in addition to providing you visibility on inbound products, receiving, storing and distribution. An effective TMS will provide comprehensive data analysis on the current shipping costs and processes which offers you an opportunity to compare your costs and processes versus what is available in the market. 

These analyses can help you optimize your supply chain process and also provide overall cost reduction. Your TMS must also be capable of handling pick and pack operations, product consolidation, replenishment and also final distribution and delivery to the receiver. 

A well designed and effective TMS is of paramount importance in:
  • Reducing freight costs
  • Automating the routing and other internal processes
  • Consolidation
  • Freight audit
  • Improving visibility
  • Tracking costs and delivery

Using your transportation management workflow, you can analyze important business metrics such as class and weight breaks, shipment density heat maps, cost/ton and cost/mile metrics, carrier utilization reports, DC optimization results, on-time performance. 

An effective transportation management workflow will also be able to make recommendations on ways of reducing costs, identifying and controlling the costs per client which will also uncover inefficiencies, if any, in your business model. For example, you may be using antiquated routing methods with your current service providers that need some modernization in order to provide you with a more cost-efficient transportation management program. By conducting engineering reviews into your customer’s data, you will be able to identify inefficiencies within the existing strategy and adopt a more dynamic carrier routing which can result in significant cost savings and reduction in transit time. 

The transportation management workflow must always be evolving as trade is dynamic and there must be constant workflow audits along the various silos within the supply chain.

Tracking and tracing is an essential and vital part of the transportation management workflow

Tracking and tracing is an essential and vital part of the transportation management workflow and the TMS used should be suitably equipped to handle this vital component in the flow. 

While everyone likes to handle their own business especially if you are in the transportation business, sometimes it may just be more cost effective to outsource the transportation portion of the whole supply chain workflow. One needs to do extensive and thorough data analysis of all current costs within the transportation and logistics silos. Such analysis will allow you the opportunity to find ways to save money for your customers but also provide efficiency in operations. An efficient way to reduce costs would also be to negotiate accessorial charges because the various carriers may have different container sizes and types that they use for the transportation.  

You can also use the TMS to plan warehouse spatial planning as your business may need to accommodate various sizes and weights of cargoes arriving in LTL or FTL modes. Using the TMS effectively will also assist in reducing the truck loading and turn around times which in turn will reduce the warehouse overheads in terms of staff overtime, etc. It may also be used to consolidate the booking processes which in turn will result in a consolidated billing process,  reducing the overall time spent doing this activity manually by auditing, reviewing, paying and collecting each invoice. 

History is the best teacher

History is the best teacher they say and in line with this, one also needs to pay special attention to historical freight data. You can analyze the performance levels of the various carriers used, achieve cost savings, and have an edge when it comes to future rate negotiations. 

Conclusion

When effectively used TMS can assist customers to gain efficiencies in improving their service offerings while also allowing them to create scalability in their business processes. Customers, especially shippers, are always looking for ways to improve service delivery and efficiency while limiting the costs. By efficiently managing the transportation management workflow, shippers can address costly challenges like rate fluctuations, hidden charges, track and trace, visibility, etc. From both a functional and cost perspective, effective management of the transportation management workflow provides value to the customer. 

BlueGrace’s Proprietary Technology

Our technology is designed to put the power of easy supply chain management and optimization back in your hands. BlueShip® offers cutting-edge tools for strong reliability and quick performance. Our customers are especially impressed with the user experience, which is completely customizable and has real-time updates, giving them a single source tool for tracking, addressing, and product listing. To see a demo and speak to one of our BlueShip experts, fill out the form below or call us at 800.MY.SHIPPING.

A Growing Need for 3PLs

It’s been a rough ride for over-the-road freight transportation over the past few years. Higher levels of government regulations have created a strain for drivers including the Hours of Service and the Electronic Logging Device mandates. These both came at a time that trucking companies were struggling with the pre-existing issue with a severe shortage of drivers. With the median age of drivers approaching retirement age, the condition will likely get worse before it gets better. Additionally, there have been huge fluctuations in both spot rates and demand over the years which have left carriers in a rather precarious situation.  

Despite the difficulties, there is good news on the horizon. Spot market rates, according to DAT and Truckstop.com, have risen upwards of 20 to 35 percent and contract rates have climbed by an average of 8 percent, year-over-year.  

This is good news for carriers, but managing the influx of work could require some extra help from intermediaries and 3PLs. Already, the conversations are beginning about solutions for the generational workforce as well as the adaptation to the increasing levels of disruptive technology hitting the markets.  

Higher Brokerage Margins 

Last year, 3PLs made due with fairly low margins, about 10 to 15 percent for freight transactions. Mostly as a result of vying for the top spot as a low-cost option for shippers who were looking for a truck on the cheap without using a service in the first place.  

Now, in 2018, with capacity tightening, shippers are making a return to 3PLs which will cause third party margins to increase to as much as 15 to 20 percent.

Because of the availability of capacity in 2016 and the first half of 2017, most shippers were able to obtain reasonable rates with carriers, which means that 3PLs had to provide an array of other services to set themselves apart from the competition. Now, in 2018, with capacity tightening, shippers are making a return to 3PLs which will cause third party margins to increase to as much as 15 to 20 percent. Carriers are hoping this will result in a sustainable relationship with 3PLs.

A Spike in Demand is on the Horizon 

Freight demand was unusually high between January and February, with a slight slow down through March. Given that these volumes are much higher than they were over the same period from last year, it’s another sign pointing towards the growing health of the transportation industry.  

If shippers want to keep up with demand, they’re going to have to change the way they do business.  

While this is undoubtedly a good start to the year, produce season, April through July, has kicked off, which means an even bigger spike in demand as produce season will give way to other peak consumer seasons including the Holiday season. Considering that all of this is outside the continual rapid growth of eCommerce markets, 2018 is going to be a busy year, to say the least. If shippers want to keep up with demand, they’re going to have to change the way they do business.  

Sensing the growing demand, many trucking companies are beginning to double up on their orders for new trucks. “Trucking companies ordered 35,600 trucks in May, more than double the orders from the same month a year ago, according to preliminary figures by ACT Research. That leaves manufacturers with an order backlog of more than 200,000 trucks, or 8.4 months of production,” according to an article from WSJ.  

“This is an astonishing rate of order placement,” said Kenny Vieth, president of the Columbus, Ind.-based ACT. “What’s facilitating it is that truckers are absolutely crushing it on freight rates and profitability right now.”  

Shippers might Start Looking to 3PLs for Visibility 

According to a report released by TIA working with Project44 and 10-4 Systems, 3PLs can, in fact, offer the level of visibility that shippers are looking for despite contrary beliefs.  

“Significant advances in visibility technologies have created a wide range of perceptions and expectations among shippers, including some that are inaccurate. 3PLs in this report identified a complicated web of factors that affect those perceptions and expectations, such as the demands of data aggregation, the need for more education, and the accelerated pace of change that affects 3PL and shipper alike,” the report says.  

Over the past year, the importance and need for visibility have only increased as suppliers are dealing with ever-increasing customer expectations and delivery standards

The TIA hopes that their report will highlight 3PLs that have a product or service offering that will provide the necessary information to shippers regarding their freight. With each passing year, the number of shippers that use 3PL services to keep them updated on their freight during the transportation cycle is increasing. Over the past year, the importance and need for visibility have only increased as suppliers are dealing with ever-increasing customer expectations and delivery standards. Walmarts OTIF (On Time: In Full) policy is a perfect example of this, which can punish shippers for not adhering to a strict delivery schedule.  

Data and Tech will Pave the Way 

It’s more than just the growth of demand that is making 3PLs a tempting partner for shippers. With the influx of big data, analytics, blockchain technologies, and so many more innovations, attempting to keep pace can be difficult. As demand grows and capacity tightens, shippers and carriers alike need to be smarter about how they operate if they want to stay competitive in today’s marketplace. 

As the industry continues to change, it’s likely that we’ll only see 3PLs continue to grow in popularity.

A Better Way of Doing Business

At BlueGrace, we take your current freight data and get an inside look at what your team may be missing. Our carrier procurement strategists will help you meet tight deadlines, optimize your freight expense, and ultimately, find peace of mind. Fill out the form below to find out more about how partnering with BlueGrace can create more visibility and opportunities to simplify, overall helping you find a better way to do business.

Supply Chain TLC

For the most part, we consider the supply chain to be a means to an end. While it’s an important means, it’s simply the process required to transition raw materials to finish product and take that product from the production floor to its end user.

While the supply chain is a rather complex system that utilizes a company’s logistics capabilities to the utmost, there are some companies that put decidedly more effort, energy, and even love into making it operate at its peak. Some companies will go the extra mile, quite literally, to make sure that they are producing the best possible product for their consumers and bringing some true innovation to the industry.

Some LUSH Sources  

Consumer consciousness has been on the rise lately as end users are becoming more aware of what goes into their products. There have been a number of reports about big companies catching flak and negative press because of their willingness to cut corners when it comes to bringing in their raw materials. It’s companies like Lush that really bring ethical sourcing to light, and have changed our understanding of a truly visible supply chain.  

Sandalwood, for example, has some incredible value for the cosmetics industry both for its scent as well as it’s therapeutic values. The tree itself takes over 10 years to grow to harvestable maturation and is predominantly found in India and Australia. Given the high levels of global demand, it’s become illegal to cut, harvest, and sell sandalwood out of India without permission from the state forest department, making it a perfect enterprise for criminal entrepreneurs.   

It strengthened my understanding of what we wanted and what we didn’t want,’ Gendry-Hearn says. In short, they weren’t going to get sustainable sandalwood from India.” 

“Gendry-Hearn and Constantine (buyers for Lush) were in India to investigate the dark underworld of sandalwood smuggling. The trip ended after a meeting in a hotel with a smartly dressed man she described as ‘the big boss.’ He entered with several bodyguards, sat across from them and put his gun on the table. Gendry-Hearn wasn’t scared. ‘My thought was: this is brilliant, this was exactly what we wanted,’ she explains. The big boss boasted that the price of sandalwood oil would never go down as he was sitting on massive reserves of wood and would restrict what was coming through. ‘It strengthened my understanding of what we wanted and what we didn’t want,’ Gendry-Hearn says. In short, they weren’t going to get sustainable sandalwood from India.”  

This is just one example of the lengths Lush undertakes to ensure their true to their word on ethically sourced materials. More than that, Lush builds on their relationships with their suppliers and promotes various initiatives (and funding) to increase awareness of corporate social responsibility.  

ADIDAS Kicks it Up a Notch 

When you consider the sheer amount of consumer goods that are made, transported, and purchased on a daily basis, it almost comes as a shock to realize that footwear is actually one of the most time-intensive products on the market today. The supply chain for shoes more closely resembles that of automobiles, parts and components are made in one location, shipped to another factory for the next assembly step, then shipped to the final factory location to be stitched, glued, and packaged as a finished product. This is a product that hasn’t changed much over the past 30 years.  

Now, however, with the rapid change in consumer expectation towards instant gratification and same day delivery, months-long process to assemble a pair of kicks simply won’t do anymore.

That’s what prompted ADIDAS to come up with the concept of the “speed factory.” “A couple of years ago, the top minds at Adidas decided this clunky, inefficient model was too limiting. “That’s why we looked into the technologies available and decided, ‘Hey, if we want to be faster and more flexible in doing what our athletes want and need, then we have to rethink the way we make products,’” says Gerd Manz, the head of technology innovation within Adidas’ Future team, which looks ahead three to seven years to set the company’s course.” 

Turning the average lead time from a few months down to a few weeks or even days is pretty astounding in its own, but when you consider the other ramifications of cutting out much of the supply chain it becomes even more impressive. The reduction of transportation costs and CO2 emissions alone will go a long way towards improving the companies standing and compliance with global green initiatives.  

Walmart’s Blockchain for Food Safety  

Walmart and blockchain alike have been garnering a good deal of headline attention in the recent past. Walmart, in particular, has launched a tough initiative for carriers and suppliers alike with their On Time: In Full (OTIF) policy which will penalize deliveries that are early, late, or incomplete.  

More than simply seeing the data, blockchain technology offers a total view of a product through its entire delivery through the supply chain.   

Blockchain, on the other hand, is an innovative new technology that will maximize the amount of accessible data within the supply chain. More than simply seeing the data, blockchain technology offers a total view of a product through its entire delivery through the supply chain.   

And Walmart’s plan with this new technology? To increase food safety.  

“One of Walmart’s grandest projects is an attempt to graft a blockchain, that immutable cryptographic ledger first used by bitcoin, onto the world’s complex food supply chains. Walmart has roped in some of the industry’s biggest players, among them fruit producer Dole, consumer goods giant Unilever, and Swiss water and food conglomerate Nestle, to form a consortium of 10 food producers and retailers to make it a reality,” according to Joon Ian Wong of Quartz 

“They’re building the technology with IBM, which has been among the most active technology firms pushing blockchain solutions to corporate technology departments. If Walmart is successful, the project could fundamentally alter the way information is secured, stored, and shared across the food and retail industry, ushering in an era where an item of produce can be tracked in real-time from farm to table, by producers and consumers,” he adds. 

Visibility is a Must

Again, consumer consciousness is on the rise. People want to know where their food and products are coming from. They want to know that it’s all being made and sourced responsibly and ethically. We’re living in an age where consumers want to know what’s going on behind the scenes of big companies and visibility is simply a must. BlueGrace Logistics offers complete, customized transportation management solutions that provide clients with the bandwidth to create transparency, operate efficiently, and drive direct cost reductions. For more information on how we can help give you the visibility you need, feel free to contact us using the form below: 

Accelerating Business Growth And Lowering Cost With Data Analytics

Too many companies are experiencing transportation and freight expenses as one of their top three costs. Smaller companies feel the pinch the most. They typically incur greater logistics costs than medium and large sized companies, as do companies that sell lower product value goods. In a recent survey, 32% of online retailers expected logistics and delivery to be their biggest cost this year. The expense of moving products or assets to different destinations should not be the leading cost in any business, if possible. (See How Does Freight and Transportation Fit into your Budget? 

What’s behind the dramatic rise in transportation costs in nearly every sector? There are simply not enough drivers on the road to keep up with demand.  

Truck Capacity Crunch 

The first explanation for the rise in transportation costs is the truck capacity crunch.

The first explanation for the rise in transportation costs is the truck capacity crunch. See “Rising Costs and Lower Capacity in the Domestic Truckload Market.” There are simply not enough drivers on the road to keep up with demand. “Surging transportation demand is spurring trucking companies to charge as much as 30 percent more for long-distance routes compared with prices a year ago, and they’re hard pressed to add capacity because of a long-standing shortage of drivers,” explains Thomas Black, in Bloomberg’s “There Aren’t Enough Truckers, and That’s Pinching U.S. Profits.” Tyson Foods Inc anticipates paying $200 million more for freight in 2018 from the previous year. Kellogg Co’s logistics costs are expected to rise by nearly 10 percent. 

Chief Executive Jim Snee of Hormel Foods, the maker of Skippy peanut butter and SPAM, says, “We don’t believe we’re going to recoup all of our freight cost increases for the balance of the year.” He informed Reuters that the company’s operating margin sank to 13.2 percent, from 15.6 percent due to rising costs – freight among them – in the most recent quarter. 

Stringent Demands of the ELD Mandate 

The second reason is the new ELD (Electronic Logging Devices) Mandate which entered into force on December 18, 2017.  Drivers are now driving less, in keeping with the new regulations. Fewer drivers on the road at any given time due to the ELD Mandate is equivalent to taking 200 to 300,000 or so trucks off the market, according to a podcast episode by Freight Savings Tips.

Truck Driver Wage Increase

With fewer people getting licensed to become truck drivers, and older drivers retiring (see “Attracting the Next Generation of Truckers”), it will be inevitable that wages will need to go up to attract much-needed drivers. To cover the cost of truck driver wage increases, truckload rates will inevitably rise. 

Fuel Price Hikes 

The rise in fuel prices is especially hard-hitting for companies as fuel represents a significant portion of freight spends – often appearing as a surcharge on carrier invoices or embedded in line-haul rates. Fuel, according to the Harvard Business Review, is often the “largest inadequately monitored part of a company’s cost structure.” 

Tom Kloza, global head of energy analysis for Oil Price Information Service calls this season “the most expensive driving season since 2014.”  

Congestion In Cities 

With increased traffic volumes and customer expectations on delivery times, the pressure to perform – quickly, and in congested parts of the city (i.e., tricky navigation) is very real. Consumer changes and complicated last-mile delivery obligations require money which must then be offset elsewhere. 

The main solution – and greatest hope for companies engaged in shipping activity –  is data analytics.

What To Do: It’s All about Data Analytics 

The main solution – and greatest hope for companies engaged in shipping activity–  is data analytics. Data analytics lessen the cost of bringing products to retailers or customers by uncovering new possibilities.  

Transportation spending covers many dimensions. Therefore, there are many opportunities to control the spend. These solutions come in the form of reconsidering warehouse processes, leveraging IT systems, revising package and product designs to alleviate excess weight and increase shipment density, or “nearshoring” (reducing the number of miles shipments travel). 

Bringing in the Experts

Companies who have relied on BlueGrace’s tried-and-true data analytics have recouped losses from mistakes they have made in the past. Consider the consumer packaged good company that underwent BlueGrace data analysis to determine what the “true cost” of its orders were (using information from historical orders) when freight cost was allocated.

The company executives were able to “drill down and allocate a freight cost to not only the customer level but the customer location, customer location type (Direct to Store or Distribution Center) and even down to the SKU level.

The company executives were able to “drill down and allocate a freight cost to not only the customer level but the customer location, customer location type (Direct to Store or Distribution Center) and even down to the SKU level. Since freight cost was not passed through to the client, this would either show a net margin loss on certain orders or opportunities to reduce the freight cost allocation on others to become more competitive. The result highlighted regions that were more costly to ship to, products that did not have enough margin potential to consider shipping unless they met a specific minimum requirement and insight into regions of the country that would benefit from an additional warehouse location.” 

With BlueGrace’ specialized business intelligence, processes become clearer. Transportation costs are curbed relative to sales and overall budget. Ready to find your own clarity today? Feel savings relief by taking the first step. Watch the video on our proprietary game-changing data service here and talk to an expert today. Fill out the form below or call 800.MY.SHIPPING (697-4477) to be connected to a Transportation Management Expert. 

Walmart’s OTIF Policy Gets Harder 

On Time In Full is a policy that Walmart created back in 2016 and implemented in August of 2017. In an attempt to drive their proficiency up and costs down, the mega retail chain started targeting their supply chain. Under this policy, suppliers that failed to deliver the total amount of promised goods, to designated stores at the prescribed time are penalized; fined up to three percent of the total shipment value.  

The shipment has to arrive exactly when it’s expected. Not before, and certainly not after.  

It’s not just trying to curb late deliveries, either. The OTIF policy also cracks down on trucks arriving too early, as it can create excess traffic and delays for loading and unloading. For suppliers and trucking companies, this means there’s no leaving early to create a buffer zone. The shipment has to arrive exactly when it’s expected. Not before, and certainly not after.   

In addition to making things more challenging for suppliers to make sure their goods arrive on time, it will bring even more stress on carriers – we discussed this in more detail in our earlier post. With the Electronic Logging Device more closely monitoring hours of service, truckers will be in a tight spot when it comes to making sure that deliveries arrive exactly when they’re supposed to, all while making sure to stay compliant with their working hours.  

A Tough Policy Gets Tougher 

As of April 1st of this year, the company made the policy even harder. Prior to this month, the OTIF policy stated that full truckload shipments needed to meet a 75 percent OTIF rating and less-than-truckload shipments needed to meet 33 percent OTIF to avoid fines. Now, FTL’s are required to meet an 85 percent standard (down from the lofty 95 percent they had originally planned) while LTL requirements have increased to 36 percent.

Keeping products on the shelf is the name of the game for Walmart.

Keeping products on the shelf is the name of the game for Walmart. With increased competition from the likes of Target, Dollar General, and Amazon, the more items Walmart can keep in stock, the less likely they are to lose out to the competition.  

A Necessary Change 

While it’s easy to paint Walmart in a bad light through this policy, they aren’t the only company to enforce such a policy. Competition stores like Target, Kroger, and Walgreens also have similar OTIF policies. If retailers don’t hold the supplier accountable and they don’t make them try to comply, then suppliers can cause backlogs.

With the 90 percent failure rate for full and timely deliveries, Walmart has found a rather convenient way to turn a problem into profit.

According to a Bloomberg report, Walmart had a OTIF success rate hovering around a dismal 10 percent. With the 90 percent failure rate for full and timely deliveries, Walmart has found a rather convenient way to turn a problem into profit. This new policy doesn’t cost the company a dime. In addition to generating money from the fines, increased product availability will also mean increased in-store sales.  

Given that Walmart is such a heavy hitter for suppliers, suppliers will have little choice but to either comply or lose out on some considerable business. With the extra revenue generation, Walmart can take that money and reinvest in its e-commerce business.  

A Hard Place for Small Suppliers 

While larger companies have no problem meeting delivery quotas, it’s the LTL deliveries that are going to take the brunt of the OTIF policy. Considering the strained nature of supply chain as it is, especially in the trucking sector. ELD and HoS mandates are pitting truckers against the clock as it stands. Couple that with the driver shortage and rising demand for LTL, and capacity becomes even more limited.   

Couple that with the driver shortage and rising demand for LTL, and capacity becomes even more limited.   

At least in that regard, the company has cut smaller suppliers a little slack, which is the reason that LTL shipments have less than half the requirements of their FTL counterparts. An LTL doesn’t schedule a delivery to a Walmart [distribution center] until the freight arrives at the terminal.

In order to avoid hefty fines being levied by Walmart and other retailers such as Kroger and Walgreens, suppliers are going to have to tighten and fine tune their logistics and supply chain considerably, especially given the current tight capacity environment.  

Do You Need Help With OTIF Issues?

A 3PL, such as BlueGrace, can help your business overcome the challenges of OTIF and other supply chain issues. If you have questions about OTIF or just how to simplify your current transportation program, feel free to contact us via phone at 800.MY.SHIPPING or using the form below and we will be happy to assist.

Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Trucking

Freight is one of the most essential industries in the United States, and according to the US Freight Transportation Forecast publication conducted by the American Trucking Association (ATA), it’s going to continue growing over the next decade. The ATA forecast estimates that US freight will grow to 20.73 billion tons by 2028, a 36.6 percent increase over tonnage moved in 2017.  

Given the considerable amount of freight being moved, the freight industry has some considerable challenges to overcome to get the job done. New regulations (such as the ELD mandate) are putting a strain on trucking companies. Fuel prices and spot rates are prone to changing which can make finding reliable capacity, booking freight, and making a profit frustrating, even at the best of times. Increasing demand means a shortage in capacity, and many shipments are being left behind and delayed. There’s also a massive driver shortage in the United States, a problem that will get worse before it gets better.  

In order to mitigate the obstacles, logistics is going to have to get a whole lot smarter.

In order to mitigate the obstacles, logistics is going to have to get a whole lot smarter. While human intelligence certainly goes a long way towards planning, artificial intelligence is beginning to take up a role in the industry.  

The Growing AI Market 

AI has a number of applications that will be crucial to the trucking industry and Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM). Increasing operational efficiency can help to reduce costs for OEMs and fleet operators. Predictive modeling is also made possible by AI, allowing for preemptive maintenance by combining data collected via the Internet of Things, sensors, external sources, and maintenance logs.   

“The possible increase in asset productivity (20%) and the reduction in overall maintenance costs (10%) can be observed,” according to a recent article from Market Research.  “Also, according to a publication by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) with vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication have the potential to prevent 40% of reported crashes.”  

In addition to increased road safety, AI can also offset the potential increase in trucking costs and higher driver wages. Artificial Intelligence will also help OEMs and fleet operators stay in compliance with new regulations regarding vehicle and driver safety. This is spurring the growth of ADAS technologies and other initiatives created by OEMs, especially when it comes to automated vehicles. It’s estimated that the AI market within the transportation industry will grow from $1.21 billion in 2017 to $10.30 billion by 2030.   

However, despite the growth and development in the AI market, installation and infrastructure costs will likely be prohibitive to smaller companies. Even a few ADAS features like blind spot detection, telematics, and lane assist can drastically increase the cost of a commercial vehicle. Adding AI systems to vehicles will also require a heavy infrastructure cost as well, further complicating implementation and adoption.  

Various AI Functions for Trucking 

Artificial Intelligence in the trucking industry presents a wide array of opportunities and potential, especially when combined with automated trucking.  

“AI constitutes various machine learning technologies such as deep learning, computer vision, natural language processing (NLP), and context awareness. Some of the recent applications of these technologies in the transportation industry are semi-autonomous and autonomous vehicles, truck platooning, and human-machine interface (HMI) applications,” Market Research says. 

Deep learning is one of the most promising AI developments.

Deep learning is one of the most promising AI developments. As an advanced form of AI, it analyzes a myriad of different data sources including images, sound, and text, and then compiles that data through a synthetic neural network. The result is the ability to identify and generalize patterns and strengthens the decision-making capabilities for safe operation of autonomous vehicles.  

Computer vision is another potential application for AI in trucking. Computer vision utilizes a high-resolution camera and increases the HMI (human machine interaction) capabilities of driver and vehicle. The camera interprets various data inputs such as lane departure, traffic signs, and signals, and is also able to detect driver drowsiness. Ideally, this version of AI will help to bridge the gap between semi-autonomous and fully autonomous vehicles.  

The Future of AI in the Trucking Industry 

AI will be instrumental in the future of trucking. Not only can it collect and monitor data, but as it observes patterns, it will be able to make predictions based on those patterns. These predictions will enhance onboard AI capabilities assisting in both driver and navigation functions as well as back-end functions like data monitoring and preemptive maintenance. Onboard AI will also increase connectivity and communication between other trucks on the road, improving platooning and other joint lane management systems.  

The strength of AI in the trucking industry will be dependent on the amount of data it has to work with.

The strength of AI in the trucking industry will be dependent on the amount of data it has to work with. The more data, the smarter the AI. Building up a database from scratch, however, can be a costly and time-consuming endeavor, one that might be impossible for some companies to achieve in a reasonable time frame.

Integrating AI systems with a transportation management system can help to reduce both costs and implementation time, however.

Integrating AI systems with a transportation management system can help to reduce both costs and implementation time, however. Working in tandem, the AI can help to increase driver safety while a TMS can optimize the overall efficiency of the supply chain, allowing for a smoother and more profitable operation.  

Using a 3PL to Prepare for the Future

While there is near limitless potential for artificial intelligence in the future of the trucking industry, it’s still a ways off from where it needs to be for rapid and easy implementation. The same is also true for automated trucking. However, there are readily available steps you can take to improve your operations without having to break the bank. We at BlueGrace specialize in true Transportation Management, without the need for a heavy investment in labor or technology. For more information on how we can help you harness the full potential of your logistics, fill out the form below: