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BlueGrace Logistics – Why We Are Attending ConExpo 2017

This week, the transportation management team from BlueGrace will be exhibiting at the Con-Expo show in Booth #B9500 in the Bronze Lot at Con-Expo in Las Vegas, Nevada. The big question is “What is a Logistics company doing at a tradeshow for construction companies?” At BlueGrace we have a firm belief that we can make EVERY business better and have proved this again and again by providing transportation management services for companies in all types of industries. No matter what the industry, we look to become your outsourced transportation department. A single provider for your freight that is more of a partner than a vendor.

BlueGrace will be exhibiting at the Con-Expo show in Booth #B9500 in the Bronze Lot at Con-Expo in Las Vegas Nevada

What Services Do We Provide

A few of the services we provide to the construction industry are:

  • Specialized reporting, business intelligence, customer engineering, and analytics
  • Dedicated operations, project management, and customer service support
  • ERP integration
  • TMS solutions
  • Freight Bill Pay and Audit
  • Claims Management
  • Freight Cost Allocation, GL-Coding, and Customized Invoicing
  • Indirect Cost Avoidance Measures

Let’s Talk More At The Show

We look forward to discussing the freight needs of the construction industry while at Con-Expo. If you stop by our booth or we stop by yours, here are a few things we would like to discuss:

  • Why did you decide to visit Con-Expo?
  • Based on your business model, would any BlueGrace customers benefit from your services?
  • Can you or your vendors benefit from any of our services?
  • What all do you have planned for the week and what do you want to take away from the show?

BlueGrace is excited to be a part of this massive show that only happens once, every 3 years! Please add us to your agenda for the week and we look forward to this week’s show!

Download one of our construction industry case studies below

This Hardware Supplier saved 13% of their yearly freight spend which added up to $260,000 annually.

Hardware Suppliers In The Construction Industry Case Study

 

Learn how BlueGrace helped this replacement parts provider keep transportation spend below 7% of their total budget.

The Logistics Behind the Construction Equipment Replacement Parts

 

Reverse logistics can be a challenge for even the most seasoned transportation team. Read how BlueGrace helped them integrate and simplify.

BlueGrace Reverse Logistics In The Construction Industry Case Study

 

 

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The Evolution of Shopping: Capitalizing on Omnichannel Retailing

 

There are many aspects of our daily lives that we tend to take for granted, at least when you compare it from it’s origins to where we are now. Communication, for example, has come a long way when you look at the evolution of the telephone to the cellular marvels that are housed in just about every pocket around the world. Shopping is another necessary aspect of daily life that has evolved considerably from its origins. Retailers need to understand these changes that are happening now, are going to be crucial if they want to stay in business.

Shopping is another necessary aspect of daily life

Disruption Breeds Change

Shopping is equal parts necessity and leisure activity for today’s population. We go to the store to buy the things we need for daily life such as consumable items and domestic goods. But there’s also the aspect of bargain hunting which thrills some consumers to no end. In either instances, there have been some considerable disruptions throughout the history of commercialism that have changed the scope and shape of the game. These disruptions, according to the Harvard Business Review, take place about every 50 years or so.

Shopping is equal parts necessity and leisure activity for American population

“A century and a half ago, the growth of big cities and the rise of railroad networks made possible the modern department store. Mass-produced automobiles came along 50 years later, and soon shopping malls lined with specialty retailers were dotting the newly forming suburbs and challenging the city-based department stores. The 1960s and 1970s saw the spread of discount chains—Walmart, Kmart, and the like—and, soon after, big-box “category killers” such as Circuit City and Home Depot, all of them undermining or transforming the old-style mall. Each wave of change doesn’t eliminate what came before it, but it reshapes the landscape and redefines consumer expectations, often beyond recognition. Retailers relying on earlier formats either adapt or die out as the new ones pull volume from their stores and make the remaining volume less profitable.”

Omnichannel Shopping, is going to pose a considerable change for brick-and-mortar retailers

The newest disruption, Omnichannel Shopping, is going to pose a considerable change for brick-and-mortar retailers, one that will facilitate the need to adapt or step out of the game entirely.

The Best of Both Worlds: Capitalizing on Omnichannel Retailing

As with just about any industry, when new technology comes into play, you either adapt and succeed or you fail. However, understanding the bridge between having a physical store and an online presence, isn’t impossible. It’s about putting customer service at the forefront. While online sales are great, especially when there are customers who don’t live within easy travel distance to the actual store, brick and mortar stores are still very important. This is especially true when you consider the fact that Amazon, which started exclusively as an e-commerce business, is now building physical locations for their shoppers. Why would Amazon want a brick-and-mortar storefront when their customers can literally shop for just about anything from the comfort of their own homes with a few simple clicks? It’s easy, shopping in store gets shoppers to buy more.

Amazon, which started exclusively as an e-commerce business is now building physical locations for their shoppers

Impulse buys and tactile shopping (the ability to touch and feel things like clothes) actually generate higher sales than shopping online does. A customer can feel the item, take in the sensations of the display and try it out for themselves, rather than trying to guess at it from a screen. This is one reason why retail stores need to keep their physical presence up before delving into the digital realm.

Transportation and Logistics can be a Big Opportunity for E-Commerce

While physical retailers will have to look into making digital investments, digital retailers are gearing up to make logistics investments. Given the rate of growth for online sales, expedited logistics and transportation is a fast growing industry. Consumers want to be able to order their goods and either have them delivered same or next day, or have the option to pick it up at the closest store. In order to make that happen, there needs to be a fairly substantial increase in the flexibility of transportation and logistics. The standards for a company’s supply chain are no longer about just getting goods from A to B. It’s more like A to Z12  and then the logistic support necessary for omnichannel retailers becomes infinitely more complex.

There needs to be a fairly substantial increase in the flexibility of transportation and logistics

Getting the infrastructure in place to make these deliveries in a timely manner will pay dividends for e-commerce companies, an opportunity that many aren’t willing to pass up.

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How Do Construction Suppliers Overcome Logistics Challenges?

The MABD and Your Construction Supply Company

Construction suppliers who provide hardware and tools are under tighter compliance regulations to get the right products to the right stores or distribution centers by a certain time, or they pay a fee. Walmart suppliers now face paying a fee of 3% of the cost of goods of all deliveries after the Must Arrive By Date (MABD).

These regulations for Walmart were implemented back in early 2016, but other retailers such as Target and Home Depot have been charging these fees for some time.

Walmart suppliers now face paying a fee of 3% of the cost of goods of all non-compliant deliveries.

Your construction supply company succeeds or fails based on the constant delivery of your products. Even more so now with the MABD mandate. The timely and effective delivery of your products, is a major priority for you, your retailers and your market. How do the logistics aspects of hardware and building materials differ from other industries?

How do the logistics aspects of hardware and building materials differ from other industries?

The truth is they don’t, with the exception of specific project dates and deadlines that could be missed.

Manufacturers and suppliers that work with large retailers like Walmart, Target and Home Depot are more successful in getting their merchandise on the shelves with the proper lead time due to partnering with a third party logistics provider (3PL).

Out with the Old

Doing things the old way, is not always the best way. Once employees get comfortable in their schedule and day to day routine it  becomes difficult to change those habits and behaviors. BlueGrace Logistics has seen and learned how to explain and implement these changes. In the case study you will learn about a Hardware distributor that was drowning in manual processes and letting inefficiencies become the norm.  

Once employees get comfortable in their schedule and day to day routine, it becomes difficult to change those habits and behaviors.

How We Reduced Costs & Removed Manual Processes for Hardware Supplier

A large big box hardware supplier, based in the Midwest, was utilizing a single national carrier model. There was no GRI mitigation, or freight bill auditing. The manual task of booking shipments was taking up much of the customer support team’s day. The accounting team had no way to tell if the invoiced amount of the shipment was the same as the quoted amount of the shipment. The ways of the past were starting to catch up as volume increased and this supplier had to make a change.

This Hardware Supplier saved 13% of their yearly freight spend which added up to $260,000 annually.

Hardware Suppliers In The Construction Industry Case Study

What About Other Construction Freight?

As a successful third-party logistics (3PL), BlueGrace handles the freight for all types of construction supply businesses. This freight can be heavy, oversized loads, such as cranes and dump trucks to replacement parts and pallets of construction materials. Our first step in any relationship is what sets us apart and brings the most value to your freight and logistics team. Your current freight data is analyzed and then processed with our proprietary engineering software.

Your current freight data is analyzed and then processed with our proprietary engineering software.

This process gives your logistics team a brand new overview of your freight. From there, your team has access to the entire BlueGrace toolbox of solutions, including ERP integrations to our flagship quoting and product, BlueShip. All of these tools come with a team of logistics experts at your disposal and a constant goal to make your freight program more successful.

Would you like to talk with BlueGrace today? Feel free to call our Enterprise Group at 800.MY.SHIPPING or come see us at the CONEXPO in Las Vegas March 7-11 Booth #B9500.

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Laying the First Bricks: Amazon is Getting Physical but Wal-Mart Fights Back

 

There aren’t a whole lot of companies that can match up to the innovative prowess of the e-Commerce giant, Amazon. It seems as though every couple of months we’re catching some snippet that Amazon is trying out a new trick for the convenience of its loyal customers and, true to it’s nature, Amazon is about to pull their next trick out of the bag. An actual grocery store.

Amazon Go

Unlike AmazonFresh, the online grocery shopping option that promises quick deliveries of produce and other perishables, Amazon Go will be an actual brick and mortar store, one of the few ventures Amazon hasn’t really gotten into yet. So why the sudden change? For starters, how about throwing the competition a curve ball?

Some of Amazon’s biggest competitors are Wal-Mart and Target, who focuses on a combined service of both groceries as well as higher ticket items such as apparel and home goods.

Some of Amazon’s biggest competitors are Wal-Mart and Target, who focus on a combined service of both groceries as well as higher ticket items such as apparel and home goods. While the groceries and produce account for a relatively small amount of the sales, it does bring in business which helps these chains hit their real goal of selling more expensive items.

Working out of a brick and mortar store will have its advantages.

Logistically speaking, trying to deliver produce and temperature sensitive goods in an appropriate time frame isn’t out of the scope of Amazon’s fairly comprehensive delivery machine, but it’s not necessarily practical either. This is why the grocery delivery service is only offered in select locations and still isn’t quite as popular as the tried and true alternative, as many customers still prefer to do their grocery shopping in stores, being able to touch, smell, and generally select their produce before purchase.

Many customers still prefer to do their grocery shopping in stores, being able to touch, smell, and generally select their produce before purchase.

According to an article from the Wall Street Journal, Amazon is experimenting with a few different styles of store, a convenience style or quick pick up store, as well as a drive through style, which lets customers skip having to walk into the store to begin with. The key is this, if Amazon has a physical location to work out of, they can capture more of the grocery market shares. As it stands, online grocery shopping is only a small portion of the business, about one percent currently, but is expected to continue to grow.

Wal-Mart Fights Back

If Amazon is going physical then Wal-Mart is retorting with the digital, according to an article from The Motley Fool. Many of the Wal-Mart supercenters are getting a technological upgrade in the attempt to keep Amazon in check in two ways. First is the curbside order pickup. Rather than having to walk into the store, select your items, then wade your way through the checkout line, you can simply place your order online and have it brought out to the car, allowing customers to skip the check out.

Additionally is the Gas and Go Style of Shopping, Similar to a Convenience Store.

Additionally is the Gas and Go style of shopping. This involves a secondary shop, similar to a convenience store, that has some last minute grocery items, coffee, snacks, and other concessions, as well as being a full service Gas Station. The twist is that, customers can place an online order, which is fulfilled by a nearby Supercenter, and arrive at a set time to have their groceries delivered while they gas up their vehicle. This level of convenience, combined with the grocery infrastructure that Wal-Mart already has in place might be enough to keep Amazon Go at bay.

This level of convenience, combined with the grocery infrastructure that Wal-Mart already has in place might be enough to keep Amazon Go at bay.

The Master of Logistics

It’s fairly safe to say that this point that Amazon’s actions are rarely without some sort of ulterior motive. Think back to the Amazon cloud services, which was originally designed to be an in-house service and was then converted into a highly successful business model.

If Amazon can get down the necessary logistics infrastructure to handle groceries and perishable produce, who’s to say they can’t then turn that service towards their competitors?

If Amazon can get down the necessary logistics infrastructure to handle groceries and perishable produce, who’s to say they can’t then turn that service towards their competitors? While it’s unlikely that many grocery stores are eager to hand over any form of control over to Amazon, it might be something we hear about in the future, especially given how skilled Amazon is at offering a high caliber service at a lower rate than the competition. Again, this is a bit too far off to tell presently, but it will be something to keep an eye on, especially as Amazon Go stores start to open around the country.

 

 

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2017 Is The Year Of The 3PL. Will Your Freight Be On Board?

While the shipping industry is still suffering through a glut of overcapacity, things are finally starting to look up. The 3PL Value Creation Summit of 2016 yielded some pretty interesting results. Namely that the value added by 3PLs is only expected to keep going up through 2017 and beyond, a welcome boon for the weary shipper. This growth is expected to continue well through the following year and only continue beyond that.

“The global third party logistics (3PL) market is expected to be worth $925.31 billion by 2020 and will be partially driven by the outsourcing of secondary business activities,” according to a study released by Orbis.

A Combined Front of Transportation

While just about all modes of transportation are experiencing an issue, oceanic freight is dealing with a gross overcapacity and weak demand, truckers are faced with growing legislation and on the road concerns, to name a few issues, it will be the combined effort of all these various modes of transportation that will create the greatest value for shippers. A service, of course, that is rendered by eager 3PLs.

“Although carrier overcapacity on the still continues, Evan Armstrong, the president of Armstrong & Associates, predicts that integrated solutions such as air-ground, air-sea, and other combinations will create more value for shippers and increase 3PL margins,” said Patrick Burnson, executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review .

The big winner in the transportation race is going to be the domestic transportation sector

However, the big winner in the transportation race is going to be the domestic transportation sector, responsible for facilitating the last mile deliveries for the majority of eCommerce companies.

Calmer Waters for M&A to Mark Stability for the End of 2016

One of the most promising signs of 2016 is seeing the feeding frenzy of mergers and acquisitions finally dying down. Now that all of the smaller companies have either been absorbed or faded away, the transportation industry is able to turn its attention on the importance of building the right team, focusing on training and talent acquisition. This is important to note given the confusion and frustration of the M&A period that many companies have experienced caused by negative acquisition experiences and overpriced companies. With the dust finally settling, 3PLs and logistics companies can focus on adding value for their customers, which will come as no small undertaking.

With the dust finally settling, 3PLs and logistics companies can focus on adding value for their customers, which will come as no small undertaking.

The challenges of managing geographically dispersed supply chain operations as a result of increased globalization, has led to several companies to outsource their logistics function.

And difficulties with addressing logistical challenges has also led to increased outsourcing by wholesalers and retailers, thereby boosting the 3PL industry.

It found that emerging trends such as Big Data and availability of bespoke 3PL services are expected to drive the market over the forecast period,” says Andrew Allen, a CIPS contributor.

Improving Technology will Continue to Add Value

Another driving factor is the continuous improvement of technology which will only add value for all parties involved. Cloud based IT solutions help to control overhead costs while providing invaluable data in real time, which is necessary for the continued success of 3PLs and shippers alike.

All told, 2017 looks to be a more promising year for both Shippers and 3PL providers.

 

 

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Is Your Freight Protected? Freeze Protection For Temperature Sensitive Shipments

As the holiday season approaches, there are a number of freight tips companies should take into account to ensure that their supply chain continues to function efficiently and cost effectively. Companies must also consider the challenges presented by winter weather that accompanies the holiday season.

Anticipating transportation delays and mapping suppliers that could be affected by big storms and freezing temperatures, are good first steps.

Winter Giving Transportation the Cold Shoulder

The 2015 – 2016 winter season was responsible for a record-breaking blizzard that brought freight transportation in mid-Atlantic states to a halt for a number of days as crews worked to clear the roads of upwards of 3 feet of snow in cities such as Richmond, Baltimore, New York City and Philadelphia. Immobilizing snow also fell across areas in Tennessee, North Carolina, Kentucky and Arkansas and thousands of freight cargo flights were grounded as major transportation hubs were closed.

Outside of unavoidable transit delays, companies also need to consider physically protecting their freight shipments from the harshness of winter.

Outside of unavoidable transit delays, companies also need to consider physically protecting their freight shipments from the harshness of winter. You should also consider working with a third-party logistics (3PL) provider that is able to offer an all-inclusive coverage plan for freight shipments to alleviate the pains of not only damaged freight, but to protect temperature sensitive shipments as well.

Technology Gives Logistics Some Valuable Insight

Weather forecasts are all well and good, but even preparing for delays due to the weather will only go so far. What about when the unexpected should occur. A truck carrying temperature sensitive materials breaks down and will miss its scheduled drop off. Will it be caught in time to make other arrangements? This creates a rather dangerous guessing game when it comes to sensitive freight. Fortunately, that doesn’t have to be the case.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is creating a valuable web of information that users can access, in real time…

The Internet of Things (IoT) is creating a valuable web of information that users can access, in real time, to check the location and the status of their freight. That sort of information can make the difference between arranging a truck transfer to get cargo to its destination on time and watching, in horror, as millions of dollars of product simply goes to waste because of a mechanical error, as was nearly the case for Biogen, whose truck carrying temperature sensitive pharmaceutical components was nearly lost when a truck broke down.

Not only does this information greatly help with making logistics decisions, especially when it comes to rerouting a truck due to weather concerns, but it can also help to control shipping costs and strengthen the working relationship of a shipper and a 3PL service provider. That alone can be reason enough, especially when it comes to dealing with the rather unpredictable Winter weather.

Find a 3PL Who can Handle the Cold

It’s important to understand that ‘Acts of God,’ such as extreme winter weather, are not covered when it comes to guaranteed or expedited freight. Being prepared in advance and moving shipments earlier than routinely expected when weather is expected, is something a transportation partner would help with.

A prepared 3PL will understand that every company has its own specific needs in relation to freight transportation and in the winter months

A prepared 3PL will understand that every company has its own specific needs in relation to freight transportation and in the winter months that can mean that some shipments need to maintain an above freezing temperature in order to maintain their quality and value. As many items such as perishable foods, chemicals & electronics are ruined and become useless if they reach a temperature below freezing, it’s important to be ahead of the coming cold.

There are several different means of protection available for shipments such as these and a reputable 3PL will work with specific carriers to make sure that your freight is taken care of properly. From heated or insulated trailers and temperature sensitive load planning and routing technology, to on-site snow removal and cargo quilt thermal blanket protection, your shipment will be protected.

Finding a 3PL that has a large network of LTL and truckload providers that offer freeze protection services to ensure that your shipments arrive safely, and on time, is key to your supply chain’s success this winter.

The challenges of winter are nothing new but preparation in advance is key. Are you prepared?

 

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Debate This: Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communications Systems

bluegrace_autonomous_driving

We saw the success of the automated fleet as it made its debut journey through Eastern Europe. The idea that something the size of a tractor trailer can link up and draft off another tractor trailer in near perfect unison seems like something out of science fiction. However, the technology is not only here, but is undergoing approval for use in not only the logistics sector, but also for non-commercial use as well. The V2V or vehicle to vehicle communications systems is currently being debated on with a final decision to be issued from the White House this coming January.

“The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) submitted a draft proposal to require V2V technology in all cars and light trucks to the White House at the beginning of this year,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, who is optimistic that the rule would be released before the next administration takes over in January.

A Frequency Issue

One of the biggest opponents for the V2V systems is the band spectrum which the system will be using according to a recent article from Bloomberg. There is a growing concern as telecommunication companies are attempting to skirt around the Department of Transportation’s issuance of the V2V rule which would allow automotive manufacturers to start making plans to use the spectrum.

The DOT and the Federal Communications Commission are working together to test spectrum-sharing tools. However, the 5.9 gigahertz spectrum band at the center of the industry fight should remain dedicated for use by connected cars until there is a proven and safe method of sharing it,” Foxx said.

About More than Just Communication

While the vehicle-to-vehicle communication system is all well and good, there’s a bigger prize at the end of the line, the driverless car. This has some pretty big implications not just for the consumer sector, but would prove to be a massive boon for the logistics industry as a whole. Imagine if the roads were free of traffic jams and snarls caused by inattentive or unskilled drivers. Not only would this cut down on the amount of accidents, but also traffic flow as a whole would be greatly improved. This improvement would come as an increase in fuel efficiency and productivity overall for trucks on the road, allowing for better forecasting and productivity for logistics decisions makers.

That is, of course, if the NHTSA, the DoT, and the White House can all come to a consensus this Janurary.

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A Change of Plans: Reevaluating A Company Supply Chain

bluegrace_achangeofplans

Sales and Operations Planning (S&OP)

Both are critical to running a successful business, however trying to favor one over the other can prove to be disastrous. More often than not, companies are losing out on considerable profits, or paying out tremendous expenses such as last minute shipping charges due to a lack of cohesion between sales and operations planning.

A number of manufacturing companies are operating off a general set of rules for supply and demand, leaving both sales and production teams frustrated when they aren’t reaching their target goals.

While these generalizations might have cut it in the past, companies are going to have to change their operations if they want to succeed and thrive in the future.

The Creation of Internal Conflict

Supply Chain Management Review, an online industry news source recently reviewed this issue as it’s occurring in a number of companies, not only manufacturing, but service firms as well. With decision makers from both sides of the companies calling shots without conferring with the other side, there are a number of mistakes being made.

“A different type of demand–supply mismatch plagued a computer hardware maker. It relied on ocean shipping for units made in China because that was $15–$20 per unit cheaper than air freight. But while the units sailed across the ocean, the commercial team frequently changed their forecast for the mix of units that would sell over the next few weeks. The company routinely had to scramble at the last minute to ship via air (at great expense) in order to match the right supply to changes in demand forecasts.”

The article goes on to list a number of different causes for these problems, the core of which, comes down to poor information. Often times different cells within the operation are operating with different sets of data, both of which are skewed, leading to complications down the line.

Learning the Best Practice

Perhaps the biggest facilitator for change is the growing expectations from clients. With higher demand for more products with shorter delivery times, manufacturers will need to get their act together. Failure to do so could mean losing out on profits or even losing clients altogether.

“Running merely good S&OP may no longer be acceptable, because customers have higher expectations for product availability and fast delivery. The spread of new digital channels, on top of existing physical channels, has made it more complicated to know where inventory sits and what it will cost to deliver to customers. Also, the supply chain has grown more complex as suppliers operate a more far-flung network of suppliers, third-party logistics providers and inventory partners. Coordinating all that activity can be a stiff challenge.”

Changing the Game

In addition to finding better ways to communicate within the business, other business are branching out in different ways and are successful in doing so.

Apple is a perfect example of this. Originally, all Apple products were made and manufactured in the U.S. which was all well and good when they started. However, it didn’t take long for Apple to realize that manufacturing could be done cheaper out of house.

Not only could parts be procured at a lower cost but everything from assembling to warehousing could be done at a better rate. Some would simply cite lower labor costs as the main reasoning for this strategy, and to that end, gives Apple some flak for not bringing jobs back stateside. However, there’s more than one side to that issue.

“It’s also about, you don’t have as many mid-level manufacturing engineers available in the U.S. anymore, just because as an economy we don’t have as many of those types of jobs. That’s not the type of education that we focus on anymore, and there’s a ton of that over there,” said Evan Niu in an interview with the Motley Fool.

“Including the lower-cost labor, they have more people that are within the specific skill sets that they need to ramp up the manufacturing. I think a long time ago they said you could fit every single manufacturing engineer within, they would need a baseball stadium; in the country, that’s just how many there are now. Over in China, Foxconn can get hundreds of thousands of engineers within a couple hours if they need them to make some change, or tweak some processor. There’s a lot of sides to the story why they do it like that,” he added.

The manufacturing industry is accelerating and evolving rapidly, creating a challenge as businesses will need to be able to adapt and overcome, altering their business structure to meet the ever changing demand. — The real question is, will companies be able to adapt to quickly enough to meet these new expectations?

 

 

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Empathy in the Workplace – Why BlueGrace is Successful!

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Empathy: The ability to understand and share the feelings of another.

Take a moment and think back to some of the jobs you’ve held in your life.

If you identify as a millennial, you’ve probably held several jobs since college. You maybe reach a point where you hit a ceiling, or you don’t enjoy the culture, disagree with management, etc. You may have worked for a company that doesn’t empathize with it’s people.

Typically the older generations have more tenure at companies and see long-term growth within. They ignore the issues with management or the mundane work culture, and “put in their time”.

So who is right and wrong in this scenario? Are the millennials wrong for wanting to be happy and pursue something different? Are the Gen X and older right for “embracing the suck”?

The feeling of being unimportant and undervalued is actually more common than you might think.

The End of an Era

The days of ‘hiring the resume’ are soon coming to an end. Highly successful start-ups are focusing on the person and not necessarily the resume, in the recruiting process.

A large issue is that companies are placing too much value on “hard skills” or the abilities of prospective employees that directly complement the nature of the position.

On paper, that sounds like what a company should do right?

There is no arguing that hard skills are important, as the company does depend on employees with strong knowledge that allows the organization to run smoothly. Putting a strong emphasis on the process has allowed companies to evolve and develop to the point they have today.

When Process Comes Before People

However, when process comes before people, when empathy and the true valuing of employees comes after the bottom line, it creates a large problem for retention.

No one wants to work a job where they don’t feel appreciated.

Prospective employees don’t want to sign up with a company where all their coworkers seem unhappy. It creates stagnation and lack of innovation, which can be the death of a business, or at least have a crushing effect on morale and productivity.

Building a Team

Much the same with playing sports, your team is only as good as your weakest player. Here’s where ideas like empathy and inclusion come into play.

Your smartest and most tenured manager may be loaded with hard skills but lack in the subtleties necessary to be an effective team player. This person could be ruthless when it comes to efficiency, which may lead to a singular mode of thinking, “My Way or the Highway” scenario.

While you might get a good jump in numbers for a time, that sort of thinking can be fragile, as it’s too rigid.

The logistics industry is constantly changing, and because of this, a good manager needs to be able to adapt and change tactics as necessary. They need the help of the team in order to stay ahead of the changes and make the process work consistently.

This is why empathy is so very important.

BlueGrace Logistics and Empathy

We’ve mentioned our Core Values before and we have highlighted our second as ‘Be Caring of Others’. This is probably one of the characteristics we focus on the most during the recruiting process.

Our team not only cares about each other, we care for our carriers, vendors, clients and partners. We work best with those who have compassion for others and truly show it.

The takeaway from this is simple. If you want a better business, you have to put your people first. Give them an environment where they cannot just survive, but thrive, and you’ll find your company will also reap the benefits.

To see all available positions at BlueGrace Logistics locations all over the US, visit careers.mybluegrace.com today.

 

 

 

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Fast Facts & Predictions About ELDs – Infographic

Countdown to the ELD Mandate

The time to plan for the ELD Mandate is now!

With the new ELD compliance creeping up on the trucking and logistics industry, we thought it would be beneficial to show some fast facts and predictions about ELDs. What do you think about the new requirements?

Click the image below for a larger version or download the PDF version here and feel free to share.

bluegrace-eld-infographic

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How does Freight and Transportation Fit into your Budget?

2017-budget

The 2017 budget season is heating up!

We all know how it goes. The heads of each department work on their annual budgets and turn them in to finance. Finance then returns with remarks like “the budget is too high, make it leaner.” How do you go about “trimming the fat” off of the transportation budget? Transportation is typically a 10-12% cost band on the general ledger for most manufacturers and distributors and once the 2017 budget is locked in, it doesn’t change.

MABD Affecting 2017

There will be challenges rolling into 2017 with freight carriers and big box retailers making their Must Arrive by Date programs or MABD rules more strict.

Huge retailers have very strict rules when it comes to receiving products by a certain date to restock their shelves. If a manufacturer or distributor is not getting their product to the retailer by the (MABD) or Must Arrive By Date, the retailer can hit the business with a ‘charge-back’ for a certain percentage of the invoice value. Not only will the business have to pay a fee, but it will reflect poorly on their business scorecard as well.

General Rate Increase with Less-Than-Truckload

At the beginning of every year the LTL carriers will begin to roll out general rate increases also known as GRIs.

Something to remember about LTL carrier GRI’s, is that the announced GRI isn’t necessarily indicative of the true impact to a shipper’s bottom line freight cost because the GRI is not a flat percentage rate increase across the board.

It is merely an aggregate combined average percentage increase across all lanes serviced by a carrier. Rates in some lanes may remain unchanged but some may increase by more than 4.9%.

A shipper could be seriously impacted by a general rate increase much higher than what’s announced by the carrier, so it’s imperative for shippers to check each lane for actual impact on costs.

Has your transportation and supply chain departments brought these items into consideration when rolling out transportation budgets?

Freight Cost Allocation

There is also the issue of past freight cost allocation. True freight cost allocation should show your most profitable ship to locations, customers, and products. Were you able to deploy sales people, advertising, and marketing budgets to the correct locations? Were customers, and product lines also accurate in relation to your budgeting for 2017 as well?

Transportation cost is much more than beating up LTL Carriers on price, sending out an annual RFP and picking carriers based on cost alone.

Don’t just remove a carrier and bring in a new one if you have a spat with the driver or if a shipment gets damaged. Make the decision based on the total of the carriers activity.

Consider a 3PL When Budgeting

Transportation costs affect all aspects of your organization and should be taken very seriously. When working on the 2017 budget, consider working with a third party logistics provider (3PL), as they will take the time to learn your business and see how these costs can affect everyone in your organization.

 

 

 

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The Logistics of Natural or Manmade Disasters

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Transporting freight to areas affected by natural or manmade disasters is one of the toughest challenges in logistics. The recent floods in Louisiana are an example of the difficulties involved. Two interstates were closed causing 55,000 daily motorists, including truckers, to use Interstate 20.

This added over 200 miles to some of the trips.

There were trucks being dispatched with relief supplies and there were trucks passing through the affected regions with loads destined for Houston and San Antonio, TX. The detours and interstate delays caused many loads to miss their service deadlines.

Now Hurricane Matthew has it’s eye on the southeastern corridor. 

Hurricane Matthew will hammer parts of eastern Florida starting Thursday, and then spread up the coast of Georgia and the Carolinas Friday into the weekend. This will inevitably affect deliveries and pick ups, as terminals will possibly be closed due to mandatory evacuations throughout the coastline.

Disaster Recovery Procedures Established

Since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and the devastating flooding of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, much improvement has been made in the area of disaster recovery logistics.

We now have established frameworks are in place to handle almost any situation.

However, due to the nature of disasters and catastrophes, logistics experts must be adaptive. An example of the Strict Utilization of Established Frameworks is brought to mind with the story of a few “Good Samaritan” truck drivers who wanted to support the Hurricane Floyd relief effort. They arrived at inland shipping locations, volunteering to move the loads of supplies at no cost. After much confusion and hours of waiting, they were turned away as the contracted carriers transported the loads.

Some companies like Anheuser-Busch, take this opportunity for charity as well. They recently sent over 250,000 cans of water to the Louisiana flood victims.

FEMA Diverts Carrier Assets

During times of disaster, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) works with contracted carriers to transport basic needs items like water, food and temporary shelter.

When the event happens, carriers supply resources to FEMA immediately because the response has to be swift in order to be effective. These FEMA contracts are very lucrative and assets must be provided as requested per the demanding federal contracts. Shippers could be left out in the cold when carrier assets are diverted to such an operation.

Specialized 3PLs Dedicated to Recovery

Major segments of the economy have standing agreements with 3PLs that specialize in business continuity and disaster recovery operations. When disaster hits, there is no time to build relationships and negotiate responsibilities. It has to be pre-planned and recorded in a binding contract or a memorandum of understanding.

When asked about his responsibilities, this small fleet owner who contracts with a specialized disaster relief 3PL said –

“I subcontract with a logistics provider who contracts directly with AT&T. The communication sector is vital to our national economy and national security, so when there is a disruption, we are called to transport fuel, generators, sanitation equipment, temporary shelters, food and anything else you can think of that is needed in a disaster response.”

In conclusion, logistics providers must have established procedures in place, prior to a disastrous event. Attempts to circumvent established procedures will not work in times of crisis.

Customer needs must be clearly defined.

Customer needs must be clearly defined for these situations and a framework of service providers identified. When such an event happens, the long hours of planning will pay off and result in the service being provided.

 

 

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Carrier Spotlight | Old Dominion Freight Lines

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OD Freight Line fits many of our Core Values. Their ability to Pursue Outrageous Goals for over 82 years, is a huge reason why we continue to work closely with them to provide our customers with complete shipping needs.

One of BlueGrace Logistics Core carriers, Old Dominion Freight line, has 226 shipping service centers, 32 transfer points, and more than 18,000 employees. OD Freight Line provides service to six major geographical regions and thousands of direct shipping points in the lower 48 States.

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OD’s single-source operation helps you manage your domestic freight shipping needs with confidence and provides complete nationwide coverage across all regions of the United States.

Their Super Regional Service allows businesses to ship both inter and intra-regionally with the most competitive transit times and pricing available.

In 1934, Earl and Lillian Congdon founded Old Dominion Freight Line in Richmond, Virginia, with one truck and a commitment to keep their promises to customers. Since then, OD has turned into a global transportation leader. Today, Earl Jr. and his son, David Congdon, carry on the family tradition of doing whatever it takes to help the world keep promises.

Recently, Old Dominion was recognized with the following acknowledgements for company leadership in the industry:

  • Inbound Logistics magazine recognized Old Dominion as a 2016 Top 100 Trucker and named the company to its 75 Green Supply Chain Partners (G75) list for the sixth consecutive year.
  • For the seventh consecutive year, Logistics Management honored OD with its Quest for Quality Award.
  • SupplyChainBrain named ODFL in its 2016 “100 Great Supply Chain Partners” listing.
  • NASSTRAC honored the company as 2016 Multi-Regional LTL Carrier of the Year for the fourth consecutive year.
  • Forbes Magazine named Old Dominion one of America’s Best Employers in 2015
  • Fortune named CEO David Congdon to its 2015 Businessperson of the Year list.
  • The ATA Transportation Security Council awarded OD with its 2015 Excellence in Claims and Loss Prevention Award for the third consecutive year.
  • Mastio & Company ranked Old Dominion as No. 1 National LTL carrier for the sixth consecutive year.
  • 2015 SmartWay Excellence Award winner.
  • Commercial Carrier Journal ranked OD No. 10 on the 2015 Top 250 Carriers list.
  • Forbes Magazine named Old Dominion as one of America’s 100 Most Trustworthy Companies for three consecutive years.

Carrier Relationships

BlueGrace Logistics is always focusing on how to make each shipment, with each carrier, cost efficient. Working with carriers like Old Dominion Freight Lines is one of the many reasons we are successful in providing cost efficient and custom transportation plans for our shippers!

 

 

 

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How Expedited Freight Can Influence Purchasing Decisions

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Steve Daniels: Account Executive at BlueGrace Logistics

Expedited Shipping Options & the MABD

In a previous blog post we detailed how BlueGrace Logistics was able to resolve a long standing Must Arrive By Date (MADB) dilemma that was negatively impacting a health and beauty products company whose business model was increasingly moving towards “big box” retailers.

While big box retailers mandate MABDs to ensure their shelves are always stocked with products consumers want, many companies who sell products out of their own brick and mortar stores or through online eCommerce sites, are often losing potential customers and revenue by not offering expedited shipping options to customers who have their own Must Arrive By Dates in mind for purchases.

Fast Growing Automotive Industry

In 2015, the US automotive industry had a record 5.7% increase in sales growth over 2014. With this increase in sales comes additional demand for parts, to service these newly bought vehicles.

Many dealerships and local service shops find themselves having to order parts from manufacturers outside of their local areas to complete repairs and get vehicles back on the road as quickly as possible. The price of an item is just one factor consumers consider when deciding where to order an item from. Others, such as those in the automotive industry, are increasingly basing their purchase decisions on how quickly they can get a product delivered.

For smaller parcel sized items a business will often utilize the overnight or next day air options available from USPS, FedEx or UPS. Many businesses and consumers aren’t aware that expedited shipping options are available for larger sized items requiring freight shipping and often they aren’t able to receive reliable or economical shipping rates from their transportation partners.

Expedited LTL Transit

The transit of a standard LTL shipment is typically estimated as the shipment being picked up and be taken to a terminal where it will be cross-docked. During this process the shipment will be loaded and unloaded from freight trucks multiple times, depending on the distance, before it arrives at the final destination. While many LTL carriers offer guaranteed shipping services, some shipments need to arrive sooner than LTL shipping can provide. Depending on the size of a shipment there are multiple expedited shipping options available for freight sized orders.

By cutting out the cross-docking in LTL shipments, expedited services are able to cover a lot more ground or air, in a much shorter time than a standard LTL carrier could.

Cargo Vans and Air Freight

Cargo vans and air freight can be utilized for shipments that would ordinarily take up a few pallet space on a LTL truck, and for orders that require a full truckload, a team of drivers can be booked so that your freight can theoretically move non-stop without breaking regulations imposed by the United States Department of Transportation.

30 Minute Guaranteed Price And Capacity

BlueGrace can easily handle any expedited freight shipment request. With a network of over 1,100 carriers and 10,000 pieces of equipment available we can meet demanding pick-up and delivery times on weekends, nights and holidays, including 2 day cross country service. BlueGrace is also one of the few providers that is able to offer guaranteed pricing and availability within 30 minutes of your request.

GPS Tracking Of Your Freight

We also offer GPS Tracking of your expedited shipment. This data is updated every 2 hours for 1 Day Point shipments, every 4 hours for 2+ Day point shipments. Either way your Expedited Freight is tracked for visibility and security.

For any questions, please contact your BlueGrace Logistics Rep today! If your request is after 5PM EST or weekends, please email expedite@mybluegrace.com

 

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How We Reduced Freight Costs by 14% for Healthy Living Company

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A company that specializes in healthy, protein rich treats was able to see a 14% reduction in a transportation costs by partnering with BlueGrace Logistics. This organization was growing at a rapid speed which lead to a long list of transportation issues that needed to be alleviated and managed more efficiently.

Opportunities For Cost Savings

Their transportation problems range from costly carrier invoices and freight re-classing to no carrier management and lack of warehouse space to hold orders. We saw several opportunities to cut their costs and improve their bottom line. Our first order of business was to break down their issues into sections and tackle them one at a time…

Does your Health & Wellness organization ship product to retail? If so, this Case Study will reveal how BlueGrace is able to transform your current transportation program for maximum cost savings.

New BlueGrace Heathy Living Product Case Study - 14% Reduction In Costs
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5 Things to Consider When Selecting a TMS

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A Transportation Management System (TMS) can offer huge benefits for manufacturers, distribution companies, and anyone who ships freight. The benefits go way beyond lowering the cost of shipping freight by helping to reduce costs throughout the entire transportation process.

Transportation Management Systems help companies move freight from origin to destination efficiently, reliably, and cost effectively. A TMS serves as the logistics hub for route planning, load optimization, freight audit and payment, order visibility, carrier management and much more.

But is every TMS the same?

Not every TMS is the same. Here is what you need to know before selecting a TMS for your business.

1. Upfront costs can be high

In most cases, your business will need to budget accordingly and prepare for a costly bill. At BlueGrace Logistics we offer our TMS to our customers as part of our business partnership package. Having a powerful and user-friendly TMS is a benefit to both our customers and to our staff.

2. It takes time

A full implementation and integration for a TMS can take several months and there will have to be upgrades every few months to ensure efficiency. It is true that integrating a TMS with other systems can take time, but at BlueGrace our in-house IT team works directly with yours to integrate almost any ERP system into our BlueShip product.

3. IT Staff

Will your IT staff be able to integrate the software into your ERP system? If you find that your staff will not be able to handle the work load for implementations and upgrades, you can partner with our IT staff at BlueGrace Logistics; we can help manage the upgrades and integrations.

4. Ongoing Management

Who will be using the system and how many people do you have on staff dedicated to transportation that would be logging into the system on a daily basis? We would recommend having a specialist dedicated to this system that is able to provide direct reports to your organization. Your team at BlueGrace will also be available to work closely with your team daily to answer questions, correct issues and instruct them how to maximize the system.

5. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

You will need to decide what exactly you will be using the TMS software for. Will your freight bills be invoiced into the TMS via EDI’s or API’s from freight carriers? Will the system manage accruals and freight cost allocation? If you answered yes, these variables would need multiple licenses and different departments working in the software during the implementation and attribute to the ongoing success of the software.

This all becomes before transportation procurement, negotiating with carriers, getting the carriers to EDI tracking, and invoicing into your TMS. Your new team at BlueGrace will discuss all these options before any integration takes place. We will work together to determine what KPIs matter most and report on them so we both know which KPIs are being hit and which may be a miss.

This whole process can be and will be overwhelming to most.

Partnering with a transportation management provider that has the dedicated resources as far as IT, transportation procurement, dedicated support, project management, finance, and operations is often a better option.

So, do the hard and soft costs outweigh the benefit of implementing a TMS software platform for your business exclusively?

Take the time to discuss with BlueGrace your needs before you shop for a new TMS. You will find that we offer all of the tools of a standard TMS. We combine that with the ability to integrate the TMS, monitor KPIs, handle disputes and provide customer support for all your shipments.

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Electronic Logging Devices:  Making time more valuable

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There has been much speculation on the upcoming electronic logging device (ELD) mandate that is to be implemented in December 2017.  The discussion often heard is not about the benefit to safety even though that was how it was sold to Congress.  The American Trucking Association (ATA) lobbied the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) for ELDs based on the promise of safer highways.

However, compliance enforcement and keeping everyone on a level playing field is most likely the goal of the ATA.

That is understandable as smaller companies and independent truckers have not voluntarily embraced ELDs and subsequently can move freight farther and faster.  But that is about to change in December 2017.

Pending Lawsuit to Stop ELDs

Before we predict the future of trucking and develop a course of action for shippers and logisticians alike, it would be clumsy to not mention the lawsuit that is standing in the way of implementation.  The Owner Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) filed a lawsuit that can be read about here and should be decided by the end of 2016.  OOIDA’s legal team has a history of challenging FMCSA overreach and winning – so stay tuned.  OOIDA’s president recommended to members that they wait on the court decision before they purchase an ELD.

The Law of Supply and Demand

Now, assuming the ELD implementation goes into effect next December, there will be an immediate demand for more trucks as the supply will be reduced.  How is the number of trucks reduced you wonder?  There will still be the same amount of trucks on the road the day after ELD implementation as the day before.

But the amount of hours available to wait on the shipper, receiver and drive will be strictly enforced.  There will be no more favors of putting in a few extra hours to get the load delivered a day early.

Some service times between a shipper and receiver may increase by an entire day if they were already borderline before mandatory ELDs.  Paper log books are easily manipulated and some shippers and 3PLs have standardized the faster service times by expecting everyone to do it.  A conversation with a 3PL agent sometimes sounds like this:  “You can’t get this shipment 800 miles to destination next day?  My other carriers do it all the time.”

Loading and Unloading Times Should Improve

The detention of trucks at shippers or consignees will have to improve.  Either the load/unload times will be expedited or heavy detention rates will be charged in order to compensate for the lost driving time.  Remember, every minute that a truck driver is on-duty will be more valuable because it will be precisely measured and regulated by ELDs.

In the past, some trucking companies have looked the other way as the dock delays cut into driving time.

Now, with strict compliance to hours of service regulations around the corner, trucking companies will no longer look the other way in order to save business, but will look to levy detention fees to shippers and receivers who unnecessarily borrow valuable driving time from a trucking company.

 

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The Busiest Time for Logistics – Holiday Season

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Holiday Logistics Ramp-Up

The busiest time of year for retail sales will soon be upon us. Logistics during the holiday season requires a significant amount of planning. If shippers are not currently prepared, they may already be too late. Product inventories are being increased as early as August of each year in preparation for the coming rush. For products arriving from overseas on container ships – early summer is when things heat up.

Nineteen percent of consumers begin their holiday shopping in October and 40% are holiday shopping during November. The average consumer plans to spend $804 for gifts and this number climbs steadily each year.

Large retailers are already moving products into warehouses and reviewing/finalizing contracts with large fleets. The sharp increase in the volume of retail products being moved in the next few months is staggering. It is “all hands on deck” for companies looking to capitalize during this strong, but brief uptick in the economy.

Where are my trucks?

Shipping around the holidays creates a significant amount of traffic, so it’s important to keep in mind the international holidays as well. Top of mind is Thanksgiving, Black Friday, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Christmas.

If your business depends on trucks to move your products to distribution centers or retail locations, I recommend that you keep constant communication with your transportation management team during the next few months. Often they are lured away from routine shipments to help support large retailers with their increased capacity needs during the holiday rush. It is a very lucrative time for carriers who are in high demand a few short weeks.

Amazon/UPS Drop the Ball in 2013

Remember the big Amazon/UPS debacle from 2013? Many packages did not make it to their destination as promised. Frankly, Amazon sold more products then projected and UPS and other carriers could not handle the excess. They have shipped more packages in subsequent years and have not had service failures as they did during Christmas of 2013. That is mainly because of Amazon deciding to take more of a lead in response to the increased demand and securing more truck capacity then in the past.

UPS and Fed-Ex contract heavily with outside carriers prior to the holidays for extra truck capacity. They both work with large trucking companies to gain line haul support in order to move thousands of extra loads from service center to service center. The trucking companies send a good portion of their fleet over to support the package carriers.

During this time, routine shippers may have trouble securing trucks for their normal operation.

That is why the constant communication between shippers and their carriers is imperative in understanding and reassuring capacity concerns.

Things to Bear in Mind When Planning for Holiday Uptick

  1. Be Proactive – Stay in constant contact with your 3PL. Have everyone on the same page and send out your forecasting to everyone who has a part in your success. “All Hands On Deck”
  2. Go Over Last Years Mistakes and Key Wins – Compile a list of previous years takeaways. Going over the things you could have done better is an effective way to avoid making the same mistakes this year.
  3. Be Flexible – As you may know one of our Core Values is to Embrace Chaos and we strongly encourage vendors, shippers, and carriers to do the same; especially during the holiday shipping season. By constantly communicating with your 3PL and handling your shipments early, you can avoid most last minute issues.
  4. Have a Plan B – Effective supply chain execution is the difference between getting products to customers on time. Make sure you have a Plan B and are able to execute it as soon as you notice any issues with Plan A!

Shippers – there is no need to fear.

There are still many solutions to get your products delivered to the destination during the busy holiday season. I recommend that you begin a business relationship with a 3PL if you have not already. You need to begin and foster this relationship as soon as possible because they too, will be called upon heavily during the holiday season.

3PLs have access to thousands of carriers across the country that can be called upon with short notice to transport your products to their destination.

Working with a 3PL anytime of the year will improve your bottom line, but if there is any time that we urge shippers to utilize the resources of a third party logistics provider – it’s the holiday season!

Is your business ready?

 

 

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Internet of Things: 2016 Status

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The IoT has come a long way within the logistics world, making both significant headway as well as changes within the logistics industry. Eft polled 600 supply chain decision makers to see what their standpoint on the IoT was, as well as any other thoughts they might of had. Of the respondents polled, many have plans to incorporate the IoT into their operations; while almost half already have an active IoT solution which means the majority of the respondents have or are planning to have the IoT as part of their inner logistics workings.

On the Roadmap

Respondents who have plans to implement the IoT have shown similar findings as those polled during 2014. While the IoT can offer a considerable amount of data, the three main areas of focus where:

  • Location
  • Temperature
  • Speed

While other variables such as Theft Prevention and Security have risen, some respondents have indicated that they are looking forward to having every statistic, showing that companies are taking a growing interest in not just the practical applications, but the potential application that the IoT can bring to their supply chain.

Additionally, the survey showed the different types of technology that companies are using to track and monitor their freight. While the IoT remains the most popular choice presently, other options such as GPS tracking, barcodes, and the much vaunted RFID aren’t far behind as companies are looking for higher levels of visibility in their supply chain.

Reasons for Implementation

There are a number of reasons companies are looking to step up their technology. Safety and compliance, access to real time freight data such as temperature and humidity levels (product integrity), as well as improving efficiency throughout their operations. However, the most important use of the IoT listed by the respondents is the customer. Having access to real time data and location for freight not only allows for more frequent updates regarding the location of their freight, but also offers companies the ability to provide better customer service through more information.

With the tumultuous nature of the freight industry, especially given the current policy changes, international regulations, and overall issues spanning from weak demand to overcapacity, strong customer service is becoming more important than ever, especially if companies want to attract and keep new clients.

Technology Growth Overall

In addition to the overall improvements to customer service and visibility made by incorporating the IoT many businesses have embraced a number of technological advancements. From 2014 to 2016 GPS and Satellite Tracking has increased 5%, data logging has increased by 14%, and IoT sensor and monitoring technology has increased to 19%. Conversely, RFID and barcode solutions have remained mostly constant, which would seem to indicate that companies are making a shift towards technologically advanced solutions.

One of the driving goals for the tech upgrades is to increase the visibility and efficiency of the supply chain. Given the complexities of land based logistics, it comes as no surprise that 80% of respondents dealing with land based freight are looking in increase visibility. About 50% of air shipments and only 33% of ocean freight carriers are looking for visibility improvements.

Implementation and Use of the IoT

Respondents were also asked how they planned to use the IoT within their business. Over half, 59% are currently using the IoT simply for real time monitoring and alarms, while 41% are looking to use the data to create predictive models and optimize their supply chain. With continued growth and development of the IoT, it’s very likely we’ll see a shift from monitoring and alarms over to prediction and optimization.

However, while there is a considerable amount of potential with the IoT, 61% of the respondents say they only utilize less than half of the information gathered. This is likely due to the lack of analytic capabilities necessary to process the sheer amount of data gathered by the IoT.

Return On Investment

Return on investment is important, especially when it comes to big ticket items like implementing new technology. The survey asked respondents what they felt the time frame on their return on investment would be.

The majority answer, at 28%, said that their ROI would be seen within 12-18 months. More confident companies, 17%, said that they would see their ROI within 12 months or less. This leaves a number of companies not expecting to see their ROI until 24 months or longer.

However according to the 2014 findings, more often than not, this was due to execution and implementation issues, which means companies who were experiencing a longer than average ROI timeframe, are confident that they would see it within a reasonable time frame after getting their program back on track.

Plans to Expand

Perhaps one of the most vital bits of information gathered is that 87% of current IoT users have plans to expand on their IoT capabilities. With the high success rate for the ROI and the growing shift to predictive modeling, the continued growth and expansion of the IoT amongst companies world wide would only help to strengthen the data collecting capabilities, providing more sources to draw from. As companies continue to make the shift to advanced technology, it can be assumed that we will see a change in the way that freight and logistics are carried out, harnessing the power of data and analytics over the trial and error method of the past.

 

 

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How Do You Cut Supply Chain Costs On Your Next Acquisition?

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The size of the private equity market is huge.

Assets under management have grown from just $30 billion to $4 trillion over the past two decades.

In the last few years the news has been inundated with “Private Equity Firm Invests in Logistics Company” types of articles. We have all seen it before and most recently here at BlueGrace Logistics where Warburg Pincus invested $255 million for a minority stake in the company. It’s a daily conversation in this space and will continue to be, as Third Party Logistics (3PL) start-ups build momentum.

But what if we twisted the story?

What if BlueGrace Logistics could assist with an acquisition from a private equity group? What if we could aid them in reaching their ROIC in a timely fashion?

These types of transactions aren’t always front and center. For example – a Private Equity Firm is considering investing in a restaurant supply company and this company has been operating their supply chain at a dismal pace with an inefficient system and extremely high costs. When identifying proprietary opportunities, a PEG should consider partnering with a 3PL.

According to the State of the Logistics Market Report, two-thirds of US total logistics costs are attributed to transportation spend. Additional industry reports further corroborate the high cost of transportation spend citing it as either the #1 or #2 largest line item cost driver for many manufacturers.

Private Equity Groups can often lack the capabilities, sophistication, experience or resources to truly transform this major line item cost into a strategic competitive advantage over their competition. For many of these clients, as business grows, transportation can exceed its internal capacity and resources thus proving difficulty to manage its day-to-day transportation function on its own. As such, partnering with a logistics provider like BlueGrace can prove beneficial.

New BlueGrace and PEG Case Study - 12% Reduction In Costs

Before The Investment:

We review your data before the investment to determine potential issues.

No cost consultation – with no upfront cost to the private equity group, VC or even the business being acquired, we can immediately offer:

  1. Introductory discovery call
  2. Historical data review
  3. Engineering reports of data
  4. Potential transportation issues
  5. Integration opportunities

After The Investment:

After the investment is finalized, an ongoing partnership would ensue and BlueGrace Logistics would continue to work with the PEG to grow profits and reduce costs.

BlueGrace clients on average, save 8% on freight costs.

We would work directly with the investment to provide ongoing logistics expertise, dedicated service reps, ERP systems integration, KPI and Goal setting, and Business Intelligence reporting.

In the case of this restaurant supply company, we were given a set of parameters and a timeline to achieve certain cost reductions and integrations.

We were able to provide 12% reduction in transportation costs – a $300k in annual savings. The PEG was also able to see their ROI within 11 months of the acquisition.

BlueGrace can vet and bring acquisition opportunities into shared services.

BlueGrace can vet acquisition opportunities for our clients. If the customer decides to acquire the prospective business BlueGrace will bring them into shared transportation services.

It doesn’t end with reporting.

BlueGrace Logistics will provide the investment and PEG with suggestions and plans to execute the changes. Lost profitability, warehouse relocation studies, consolidate shipments and much more will be addressed in order to cut costs.

BlueGrace provides scalability for PEGs to achieve their aggressive cost cutting and profit goals without labor or technology investments.

Our expertise and processes provide PEGs with the bandwidth to operate efficiently and drive direct cost reduction through our procurement and dedicated management.

It’s a partnership worth investing in.

When a private equity group is considering acquiring any company, especially a manufacturer, a 3PL with a track record of success should definitely be brought into the mix. BlueGrace Logistics brings a tremendous amount of knowledge and skill to quickly assess situations which in turn generates substantial savings and performance improvements to supply chains.

New BlueGrace and PEG Case Study - 12% Reduction In Costs

 

 

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