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Selyna Goldklang

E-commerce Returns Are A Major Challenge To Retailers

CNBC called returns a $260 billion “ticking time bomb,” in terms of the billions that retailers face each year handling unwanted, used or damaged goods. That’s a dramatic shift away from brick-and-mortar era when customers did most of the legwork, and employees could process the transactions in less than a minute.

E-commerce has flipped the paradigm and with giants like Amazon.com and Walmart.com transforming online retail into a virtual changing room – customers are growing more comfortable simply returning clothes that they don’t like, or that don’t fit. According to the Reverse Logistics Association, the average return rate on in-store purchases is about 8 percent. For e-commerce, the rate jumps to between 25 and 40 percent.

Managing that surge in two-way traffic can be a nightmare for smaller businesses

This time around, managing those shipments and paying for them falls onto the shoulders of retailers. That’s easy enough for established e-commerce companies, thanks to their extensive and sophisticated logistics operations, but managing that surge in two-way traffic can be a nightmare for smaller businesses, especially ones that are just now venturing into the realm of e-commerce.

Some Companies Are Looking Askance At Those Costs

In 2016, research from Barclaycard found that six in ten retailers were negatively affected by the growing costs of people returning items that they bought online. Online-only businesses were hit the hardest, with 31 percent telling Barclaycard that managing returns was hurting their profit margins.

Some businesses are even raising prices to cover the costs of returns, but that’s not a long-term strategy for success

Some businesses are even raising prices to cover the costs of returns, but that’s not a long-term strategy for success. Other businesses are getting out of online retail altogether, turned off by the volume of returns. That’s because on an individual level, it is incredibly hard to compete with the logistics outlays of major online retailers.

What Changed?

Amazon started the trend, turning its platform an easy-return zone. That means no questions asked returns, inducing buyers to add products to their shopping carts that they wouldn’t purchase with a no-refunds policy. That’s translated into more sales, but it’s created a headache for companies that operate in the Seattle retailer’s shadow because now, consumers expect the same thing from other retailers.

This trend is especially pronounced in fashion, where customers deliberately order far more items than they pay for, but its spread throughout the market.

Clicking That “buy” Button Sets Off A Mind-boggling Chain Of Logistics Transactions

The process of e-commerce tends to work best as a one-way street, with automated systems built to speed products to consumers as quick and cheap as possible. But e-commerce has given its customers a stake in the supply chain process, and today, they demand the same speed to reverse the process. Customers want that resolution and refund, fast.

A well-built and highly-transparent return management process is critical for two reasons. It reduces costs, allowing companies to grow margins on their online sales, and just as importantly, it keeps customers engaged and happy.

Keeping them informed and happy is critical to generating return business.

Until the return is processed, the customer is out the cost of their purchase, and the company is out the cost of transporting and processing the return. Nobody’s winning in that scenario, so the sooner the retailer can process the return, the better. And while that’s going on, the customer has a right to know where their product is, and when it’s going to be processed. It’s their money after all. Keeping them informed and happy is critical to generating return business.

To avoid tying up resources in a bloated logistics operation, companies need to revisit their approach to customer support and returns

Simply put, it’s relatively easy to sell goods online. There are scores of solutions for smaller companies, and larger ones have their own logistics operations. But far fewer companies can efficiently handle those pesky returns, despite the fact that they are an increasing part of online retail these days. To avoid tying up resources in a bloated logistics operation, companies need to revisit their approach to customer support and returns, and provide full transparency throughout the whole returns and claims process, to ensure high customer satisfaction rating.

Streamlining the Process

It’s important to understand and analyze returns to the granular level, leveraging that data to streamline future returns and ultimately, make sales more profitable.

The logistics experts at BlueGrace review historical shipping data to increase profit, cut labor costs, and keep the online customers loyal to brands by streamlining both the buying and returns process that underpins e-commerce in 2017. It’s important to understand and analyze returns to the granular level, leveraging that data to streamline future returns and ultimately, make sales more profitable. BlueGrace Logistics offers complete, customized transportation management solutions that provide clients with the bandwidth to create transparency, operate efficiently, and drive direct cost reductions. For more information on how we can help you analyze your current freight issues, feel free to contact us using the form below:

 

BlueGrace Donates To Help Families Across The Country

The holiday season means many things to many people. For some, it means traveling hundreds of miles to see family and old friends. For others, it means preparing to host 20+ hungry guests and swearing never to do it again. While most simply worry about booking their flights or having enough seats at the kids’ table, there are some that worry they won’t be able to provide a holiday meal for their family at all. These are the members of our community that want to sit down at the table with their families and enjoy their favorite holiday foods, but aren’t sure where the money to pay for that meal will come from.

Partnering For A Cause

BlueGrace partnered with local organizations throughout the country again this year in an effort to decrease this need in local communities. In Tampa, the corporate office partnered with Metropolitan Ministries to host “Boxes of Hope,” a food drive that provides food to local families. This year, the Tampa team used the money collected through raffles, a hot one chip challenge and a rap battle to provide complete thanksgiving meals for 234 families, as well as donate over 200 lbs of canned and boxed goods to be distributed through Metropolitan Ministries’ food pantry.

We in turn feel very blessed to be able to make a difference for this family. It is a win-win all the way around.

BlueGrace’s Baltimore office hosted their own “Boxes of Hope” drive and adopted a family at Perry Hall Elementary School. They were able to provide a full Thanksgiving meal as well as a few treats, a $25 gift card and additional groceries to the family. “The family wanted us to know how blessed they felt to receive such a generous gift,” Michelle Welk, Customer Support Manager of BG’s Baltimore office explained. “We in turn feel very blessed to be able to make a difference for this family. It is a win-win all the way around.”

“Giving back to the community is part of who we are as an organization,” George Flores, a sales account manager in the Tampa office describes. “These drives combine my two favorite core values- our first core value of ‘Be Caring of All Others’ and our fifth, ‘Be Happy, Humble and Have Fun.’ While we are cheering on our teammates to eat a pie with no hands as fast as they can, we are raising hundreds to go towards a great cause.”

No Child Hungry

BlueGrace’s LA office kicked off their holiday season on the west coast by collecting and donating a full shopping cart of groceries to the Santa Clarita Valley food pantry for their “No Child Hungry” program. “This time of year, there’s so much to be thankful for,” Connor Bush, account manager in the LA office says. “One of those things is the ability to give back and make a difference in our community.”

We all need a hand up sometimes, and BlueGrace is here to be that hand for those who need it.

“I will never stop being moved by the impact these drives make in our communities, or seeing our employees band together to help those in need,” Courtney Smith, Manager of Culture & Engagement for BlueGrace continues. “Whether it’s in Tampa, Baltimore, LA, or any of our other offices throughout the country, the sentiment is the same. We all need a hand up sometimes, and BlueGrace is here to be that hand for those who need it.”

Cost or Asset: The Need for Talent in the Supply Chain 

When it comes to the supply chain, efficiency is the name of the game. The smoother the interaction between the links, from start to finish, the more profitable everyone is along the line. Companies have been furiously analyzing every facet of the chain, from transportation routes to in-house technology and processes in terms of the financial efficiency. In short, if it can give an advantage, improve the system, or help to cut down operating costs in any way, it’s typically touted as a good thing.  But when it comes to investing in that efficiency, where is the best place to hedge your bets? Is it in technology? A consulting firm? While all of these are important, is any one of them hiding the real key to success.

The Un-Correlated

Given the many different assets a company could hitch their hopes on, it would seem like one would rise above the rest, right? If nothing else, given the size and scope of the transportation industry, there would at least be a trend towards one process over the other. While it makes perfect logical sense, the truth of the matter is, there really isn’t a direct correlation between investment and success in the industry.

“Despite all the ads at airports and pretty PowerPoints by consultants, we cannot find support for the claims of ‘Best Run Companies Use Technology X’ or ‘Manufacturing Companies Using Consulting Services With Company Y Have Better Results.’  …or a single instance of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) drives better results,” says Lora Cecere, the founder of Supply Chain Insights.

Companies think that they are managing costs and inventory better through technology investments, but they are not.

“Across the industry, we find that companies think that they are managing costs and inventory better through technology investments, but they are not. Through graphing the financial metrics, we find that 90% of companies are stuck at the intersection of operating margin and inventory turns. With rising complexity, they are unable to make improvements in a balanced scorecard,” she added.

Talent Makes the Difference

When it comes to controlling costs, the only constant for improvement is the investment in supply chain talent. According to the survey taken by Supply Chain Insights, it was the companies who could manage their talent better than their peer groups that gained the cost advantage. This played out in three different metrics: Operating Margin, Profit Margin, and EBITDA as a percentage of Quarterly growth. In all three of these metrics, it was proper talent management that proved to be the most effective.

So what are these companies with better talent management doing that their peers aren’t?

So what are these companies with better talent management doing that their peers aren’t? There are six aspects or gaps in particular that these companies are focusing on.

“Belief in the company, appreciation for work, the need to be a part of a talented team, admiration for leadership, training and professional development and flexible work schedules. Empowered workers make a difference. With the flurry of M&A, industry consolidation, outsourcing, and downsizing, the gaps for North American manufacturers are increasing,” says Cecere.

 Provide a job where your employees feel appreciated, and are given the tools they need to not only succeed, but grow, and you’ll have a more dedicated workforce.

Provide a job where your employees feel appreciated, and are given the tools they need to not only succeed, but grow, and you’ll have a more dedicated workforce.

“Most companies have an endless cycle of cost-cutting. The cost-cutting is more severe in the back office than the front office teams of sales and marketing. Companies are often so busy pinching pennies that they miss the greater opportunity. With slowing growth, as companies end the year, many teams face draconian cost-cutting efforts. When faced with these choices, just remember that empowered employees drive a competitive advantage. Our take? Talent matters,” Cecere adds.

The Reality of the Human Asset

Human talent will invariably become more valuable than any physical asset, including technology.

Investing in talent is about much more than merely cutting costs down the road. Human talent will invariably become more valuable than any physical asset, including technology. A study conducted by Korn Ferry and the Centre for Economic and Business Research, a British economic consultancy shows just how valuable people are to any organization.

“The study found that globally, human talent—people, labor, knowledge—will be worth as much as $1.2 quadrillion over the next five years whereas physical capital— inventory, real estate and technology—will be worth an estimated $521 trillion, showing human talent, intelligence and capital is far more valuable than physical capital,” the  22nd Annual Third-Party Logistics Study reports.

“Human talent is also the greatest value creator available to organizations. For every $1 invested in human talent, $11.39 is added to GDP, proving that investing in people can generate value for the organization over time that significantly exceeds initial financial outlay.”

While automation and new technology might replace some facets of the industry, even truck drivers, there will always be a need to have highly skilled professionals on the roster.

When you consider the rapidly evolving nature of the industry, it’s easy to see just how vital talent is to any company. While automation and new technology might replace some facets of the industry, even truck drivers, there will always be a need to have highly skilled professionals on the roster. Providing them with the right technology and opportunities to grow will not only enable them to sharpen their skills but also increase their value and subsequently the value of your business.

Your Supply Chain Talent Is Readily Available Here

There is no need for companies to search for more supply chain talent. BlueGrace has 100s of talented people with the skillsets to help improve or develop your supply chain. Imagine that you had 3 more people working on optimizing your freight for each single employee you have in-house. That is the value the team at BlueGrace offers. Let us monitor your costs, communicate with the carriers and lower your overall freight spend year over year. Contact us at 800.MYSHIPPING to talk with an expert today or fill out the form below.

Are You Part Of The Available Supply Chain Talent?

Are you part of the supply chain talent pool? Are you eager to work with a company that helps simplify businesses across the USA? Do you feel a sense of accomplishment when you can cut costs for a customer? If so CLICK HERE to see all the positions available throughout the country at BlueGrace. We are constantly awarded a best place to work and love to see our employees succeed!

BlueGrace Employee is Pedaling for a Cure

Pedaling for a Cure

On October 28, 2017, our own Gary Brodsky, better known as “Kickstand”, was honored by the Chairman/Owner of the New England Patriots, Robert Kraft. Gary has been at the helm of the Patriots Platelet Pedalers for 10 years now. The PPP, as they are known, raise critical dollars for research each year by cycling in the Pan Mass challenge.  The Pan Massachusetts Challenge is a weekend long charity bicycle ride to benefit Dana-Farber through the Jimmy Fund. Started in 1980, the Pan Mass Challenge is the largest charity bicycling event in the country, raising over $500 million for cancer research and treatment. Gary was honored for his OUTSTANDING fundraising efforts, raising over 1 million dollars for the Pan Mass Challenge this year.

The History behind the Pedalers

Patriots Platelet Pedalers Logo on the big screen at Gillette.

Ronald E. Burton was an American football player for the Boston Patriots.  He was a consensus All-American running back at Northwestern University, and is a member of the Northwestern Hall of Fame and College Football Hall of Fame. Burton was the Boston Patriots’ first-ever American Football League draft choice in 1960. He was the first Patriot to rush for over 100 yards, along with many other firsts. Burton also still holds a Patriot record for his 91-yard touchdown return on a missed field goal in 1962.

In 1999 at 64 years of age, Ron was diagnosed with multiple myeloma (bone cancer) and given one to three years to live.

Ron Burton was treated at DFCI and became great friends with Dr. Ken Anderson. Dr. Anderson is one of the world leading researchers on multiple myeloma. 100% of the funds the Patriots Platelet Pedalers raise through the PMC are earmarked for Dr. Anderson’s continued efforts.

“We ride because we can. We ride for those who can not. We ride because the training rides and the 192 miles on the two days of the Pan Massachusetts Challenge (PMC) are nothing compared to living with or dying from cancer.”

One Team, One Mission

Robert and Josh Kraft address the over 200 guests who attended this year’s check presentation and rider appreciation party at Gillette Stadium on 10/28. 

Check for dollars raised in 2017 by 168 riders on Gary’s team for cancer research at Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

Our Core Value #1 Be Caring Of All Others

BlueGrace is grateful to have such outstanding employees like Gary, who are striving to make a difference in our world and future. At BlueGrace we take as many opportunities as we can to help our communities, both people and animals when they need us most. Thank you Gary for leading the way!

Urban Density, Changes in Technology and Last Mile Delivery: What Can Cities Do?

 

With the rise of e-commerce and technological improvements in transportation, like autonomous vehicles and increasing urban density, we are witnessing a historic transformation in our cities. Future trends in freight movement is a “hot topic” in policy and supply chain circles.

With so many changes ahead,  a key question emerges: Can cities cope?

Daimler recently made headlines with the launch of its “all-electric Fuso ecanter truck” in New York City. The vehicle will be rolled out in other US, European and Japanese cities in the next two years, with UPS as the first commercial partner with the truck. Toyota released a hydrogen-fuelled semi-trailer that currently hauls cargo between the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach without producing tailpipe emissions. This pilot is part of a longer-range plan by the Port of LA to reduce emissions. Urban planners in Dallas are examining the possibilities for the “hyperloop” in their city, “a futuristic mode of travel that would use levitating pods to shuttle people and goods across hundreds of miles in minutes.” With so many changes ahead,  a key question emerges: Can cities cope? What can cities do to stay on top of change?

Here are five “takeaways” on the topic.

1.   Understanding the Nature of Change is Key

Many predict that the U.S. economy will double in size over the next 30 years. The nation’s population is expected to rise from 326 million in 2017 to 390 million in 2045. More and more, Americans will live in congested urban or suburban sprawls called “megaregions.” Less than 10% of the country’s population will live in rural areas by 2040. This is a stark contrast to the 16% of Americans who lived in the countryside in 2010 and 23% in 1980.

This trend means more “everything”.

The surge in population and economic growth brings with it escalating freight activity. Freight movement across all modes are projected to grow by approximately 42 percent by 2040.This trend means more “everything”. More pressure on roads and transit lines by commuters, more parcels delivered, particularly with the meteoric rise of e-commerce.

One special concern is “the last mile.” The last mile is the final step in the delivery process. The last leg of the delivery process is when an item (or person) moves from distribution facility (or transit point) to end user (home). The length of the distance can vary from a couple of city blocks to 100 miles. This video from the Ryerson City Building Institute clearly shows the effects of the “last mile” on commuters – in this case, in the Greater Toronto Area.

Some of the challenges involved with the last mile are:

  • increased traffic congestion and traffic accidents
  • Noise, intrusion, the loss of open spaces to transport infrastructure projects
  • Environmental and social (public health) impact from local pollutant emissions
  • Illegal parking and resting, idling vehicles
  • Problems experienced by vehicle operators when operating in urban areas
  • Parking and loading/unloading problems including finding road space for unloading; fines, and handling
  • Parcel Theft

2. Cities Must Take Notice

Cities have long been concerned with capacity thresholds for commuting and predicting traffic flow. The new topic of “last mile” in the supply chain must now receive greater notice. We are moving away from discussion on “smart commuting” alone. While still important, traditional topics like carpooling and promoting public transit are giving way to issues such as digitalization and automation (think ride-hailing and autonomous shuttles).

3. Business Concerns Must Factor Into Urban Logistics (alongside Sustainability and Livability Goals)

Furthermore, it must be recognized that economic activity in urban areas depends on the movement and delivery of goods through freight carriers. City and traffic planners must be made aware that urban settings can be inhospitable places for freight deliverers. There must be more public and private sector coordination in freight planning. “Cities can shape markets to focus private sector attention and invest on the needs of cities and the people who live in them by mobilizing infrastructure, talent, and other assets to support the right kinds of AV-based solutions,” was one of the conclusions in “Taming the Autonomous Vehicle: A Primer for Cities (Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Aspen Institute) .

Business goals must be incorporated into the dialogue alongside the goals of community sustainability and livability

How freight distribution processes can be integrated into metropolitan transport, land use, and infrastructure planning is a balancing act.  Business goals must be incorporated into the dialogue alongside the goals of community sustainability and livability. An efficient and future-forward freight system will support and attract new industry for the respective area.

4. A Variety of Solutions Will Likely Be the Answer

Some of the most popular solutions include advances in technology. Transportation technology growth is very exciting, much of it spurred by seeking solutions to urban density, commuting and freight patterns.  Other solutions are more “old-fashioned” or even a return to basics. Mixing traditional and emerging technologies is the way ahead:

  • Use of electric vehicles (EV) –“sustainable mobility”
  • Autonomous vehicles and drones
  • Human-powered delivery vehicles – Cargo-bikes, pedal trucks, and pushcarts
  • Amazon lockers in commercial venues (drop-off points)
  • Vehicle access restrictions based on time and/or size/weight /emission factor/fuel type of vehicle and bus lanes
  • Curbside pickups
  • Load consolidation or co-loading
  • Truck platooning
  • Night-time deliveries, relying on “quiet equipment” and driver training
  • “On-Road Integrated Optimisation and Navigation,” or route optimization, such as introduced by UPS as a big data solution to analyze parcel operators’ daily multi-stops
  • Innovative 3PL solutions like BlueGrace’s proprietary technology, “designed to put the power of easy supply chain management and optimization back in your hands”.

A BlueGrace Case Study In Action

Recently, an e-commerce furniture business in Portland, Oregon found it had outgrown its 3PL’s manual logistic capacity, due to heavy e-commerce volumes. When this company looked to BlueGrace for ways to improve its supply chain, it was discovered that they would benefit from opening another warehouse in the Northeastern area of the US. An alternative distribution solution lowered freight costs and decreased transit days.

For the last mile to be facilitated, there must be easier access to customers and shorter distance between the hub and home.

The idea of re-examining distribution is part of a larger process of change. For instance Amazon, FedEx and UPS are creating/investing in nationwide networks of distribution and fulfillment centers. “Warehouses like these are becoming a way of life for many urbanites,” reports the Wall Street Journal. This trend is already bringing new life to formerly “sleepy towns” like Tracy, California and Kenosha, Wisconsin. For the last mile to be facilitated, there must be easier access to customers and shorter distance between the hub and home.

Make your Last Mile work. Talk with a BlueGrace Logistics expert today!

An Optimistic Outlook for the LTL Market

The US less-than-truckload (LTL) market is undergoing a tremendous change. Improving economic conditions as well as manufacturing growth has helped increase demand for LTL shipments. As a result, Stifel analyst David Ross noted that the $35 billion LTL market combined for publicly traded carriers reported tonnage per day increased 4% year-over-year during the second quarter of this year.

Indeed, the overall US economy appears to have awakened after a sluggish start to the year. First quarter GDP rose only 1.4%, a disappointment for sure but second quarter growth certainly made up for it growing at a 3.1% clip thanks in part to strong consumer spending.

E-commerce

E-commerce is taking more of the consumer’s spend. According to the US Commerce Department, second quarter e-commerce as a percent of total retail sales increased to 8.9%, up from 7.4% in second quarter 2016. The rise in e-commerce has sparked new service solutions from LTL carriers particularly as “supply chains become shorter, turn times are quicker and there’s a drive for small, but more frequent shipments”, according to Mr. Ross.

Some truck carriers have introduced last mile delivery services for items such as exercise equipment, mattresses, and furniture.

E-commerce packages have been the primary domain of small parcel carriers FedEx, UPS, USPS and regional small parcel carriers. However, as more consumers become habitual to ordering larger, bulkier items, FedEx and UPS, in particular, have struggled because their small parcel facilities and networks are not designed for such items. As a result, some truck carriers such as JB Hunt, Estes and Werner have introduced last mile delivery services for items such as exercise equipment, mattresses, and furniture. XPO Logistics, the third largest LTL carrier per the Journal of Commerce’s 2017 ranking, has taken it a step further by also offering white glove services such as set up, install, recycle etc. and just recently announced plans to expand their last-mile hubs to 85 within a few years. In addition, it is introducing technology that will allow consumers manage retail home deliveries with advanced, online tools.

Technology

Many shippers are looking for more integrated services, faster delivery and fulfillment and increasingly detailed shipment tracking and information. Also, third-party technology start-ups and TMS providers, such as BlueGrace are offering real-time pricing, booking and tracking solution services targeting both the shipper as well as the LTL carrier who may have available capacity on a particular lane.

Pricing and Labor

Stifel’s quarterly overview of LTL trends indicates that fuel surcharges are returning back close to 2015 highs (but remain far below 2011-2014 levels). Carriers are aiming for 3%-5% rate increases, and while getting some push back, they’re not losing freight over any rate hikes. The pricing environment currently remains healthy but could prove a concern over capacity.

LTL carriers are finding it more difficult to hire the needed labor to meet the increasing demands.

Labor continues to be another concern. LTL carriers are finding it more difficult to hire the needed labor to meet the increasing demands. Those that are hired are demanding higher wages. As an example, YRC was able to get some concessions from the Teamsters to allow them to raise pay above the contract level in certain markets.

ELD

The federal-mandated regulatory requirement, ELD (Electronic Logging Device) is set to go into effect in December. ELD is an electronic hardware that is put on a commercial motor vehicle engine that records driving hours.

It is believed that ELD could benefit LTL carriers at the expense of TL carriers.

It is believed that ELD could benefit LTL carriers at the expense of TL carriers. As such, many industry analysts anticipate pricing to increase as well as tonnage while TL capacity is reduced. As the Vice Chairman and CEO of Old Dominion Freight Line stated earlier this year, “A 1% fallout in truckload could equate to a 10% increase in the LTL arena, with larger LTL shipments.”

Outlook

The Journal of Commerce’s annual LTL ranking showed that total revenue dipped 0.4% from $35.1 billion to $34.9 billion after falling 1% the previous year. However, with US industrial output, consumer confidence and an increase in fuel prices, the top LTL carriers will likely return to expansion and revenue growth for this year.

The Growing Need For Expedited Freight

Consumer expectations are changing. While this doesn’t come as a shock, the rate at which they are changing is picking up tempo. As eCommerce giants like Amazon and Alibaba continue to push the envelope, consumer expectations change as a result.

Today, the market has an expectation of “buy it now, wear it now.” While online shopping used to be a novelty, now it is the norm. With the advent of Amazon Prime offering a two day delivery for most products, people simply aren’t content to wait. While that’s great for consumers, it creates a significant shift in the way we look at logistics.

Disruptive Factors to Logistics

There are many speculations on what the most disruptive factors in logistics are. Some will point at ports, mega ships, and increased regulations. Others will say it’s the shortage of qualified drivers that are causing the most issues. CEO of FedEx Ground, Henry Maier, says it’s the next person to place an order through Amazon Prime. The “unparalleled and unprecedented growth” of e-commerce has created a “landscape of continuous change” that is rewriting the transportation playbook, Maier said.

Shippers need to be able to respond quickly to meet customer demand.

FedEx isn’t the only company that’s feeling the shift. “Think about the way things used to be on the parcel side,” Jack Holmes, president of UPS Freight, said. “Our business used to run right up to Christmas and then get very soft for six weeks. Now that (post-holiday) period is one of the most challenging for us.” Shippers need to be able to respond quickly to meet customer demand which means they need carriers that can meet their needs. That expectation and demand are only going to continue to grow as time goes on.

More About The Challenges

shippers need to not only be smarter about how they handle logistics, but they need to be smarter about how they handle their customers as well.

More than simply responding quickly, shippers need access to carriers that can suit their needs. Having trucks with lift gates, for example, is necessary for urban and suburban deliveries. Not only does this mean quicker deliveries but also a better service. Service, after all, is key in today’s market. Not only do consumers expect near instantaneous deliveries, but they have many platforms to express dissatisfaction should a shipper fail to perform. Therefore, shippers need to not only be smarter about how they handle logistics, but they need to be smarter about how they handle their customers as well.

The Growing Need for Expedited Freight

The holiday and the post-holiday season can become the most frantic for shippers and carriers alike. As holiday shoppers go on a spending spree, delivery times tighten as does available capacity. As a shipper, it’s important to have access to a reliable network of expedited carriers. Getting your products where they need to be, when they need to be there. So what do you do when you’re in a bind and need to have something shipped yesterday? Call BlueGrace Logistics.

 Why BlueGrace?

BlueGrace is an award-winning, full-service Third Party Logistics (3PL) provider that helps businesses manage their freight spend through industry-leading technology with a large network of established carriers to customers across the country. Sure, lots of firms may claim that, but what really sets us apart is our passion for supporting your success in this complex $750 Billion U.S. freight industry.

Our expedited freight services are second to none.

Our expedited freight services are second to none. We offer 30-minute quotes on price and capacity directly, from over 300 pre-screened, local expedite carriers nationwide. With over 10,000 pieces of equipment from Sprinter vans and semis, to domestic air, we can handle any type of freight. Each shipment is tracked by Macropoint, so you always know where your freight is located.

 

 

 

 

Saving Lives Through The Power Of Giving

At BlueGrace Logistics, our number one Core Value is Be Caring Of All Others. Every six weeks, we invite One Blood to come out to our Tampa office where our employees are able to take some time out of their day to go out and donate.

The Benefits of Donating

Not only do the people who are receiving blood transfusions benefit from the donation, but there are also some health benefits donors receive as well. Each time you donate you’ll receive a free wellness checkup which includes blood pressure, pulse, temperature, iron count and cholesterol screening. Studies have also shown that giving blood regularly can help keep your iron levels balanced, can result in fewer arterial blockages and giving at least three times a year may reduce the risk of heart attack.

Every two seconds, someone in the U.S. is in need of blood.

Every two seconds, someone in the U.S. is in need of blood. Once you complete your donation and your pint of blood is tested and marked as safe to use, the blood will be transfused within 48-72 hours. Many people think that accident and trauma victims are the patients who need blood transfusions most, but patients being treated for cancer, undergoing orthopedic surgeries, cardiovascular surgeries or being treated for inherited blood disorders are actually where blood is most needed.

Be Caring Of All Others

According to One Blood, over 37% of the population is eligible to donate blood, yet only 5% actually do. As of 2016, BlueGrace has donated over 130 units of blood. With each unit of blood, up to three lives can be saved. That is almost 400 patients that could benefit from the lifesaving efforts of BlueGrace employees! Mike Sumnick, VP of Operations at BlueGrace and the coordinator of the blood drives states, “We pursue outrageous goals here at BlueGrace, and every time we host a blood drive, we will strive to help save even more lives.”

To find a donation center near you, please visit https://www.oneblood.org/donate-now/